Thursday, April 29, 2021

USA: #1 Pop Songs, 2020-2029

USA’s #1 Pop Songs:

2020-2029

These are the #1 pop songs in the history of the United States pop charts from 2020 to 2029. Songs could have hit #1 on any of the following charts:

  • Billboard Hot 100 chart, 1955-present (BB)
  • Billboard pop airplay chart, 1984-present (BA)
  • Billboard digital chart, 2005-present (DG)
  • Billboard streaming chart, 2013-present (ST)
  • Radio & Records/Mediabase, 1973-present (RR)
Numbers following the letter codes indicate how many weeks the song spent at #1 on that chart.

Click here to access a full list of #1 songs from 1890 to present.


2020:

  1. 1/11: Roddy Ricch “The Box” (BB: 11 weeks, ST: 13)
  2. 1/18: Justin Bieber “Yummy” (DG: 1)
  3. 1/25: Future & Drake “Life Is Good” (DG: 1)

  4. 2/15: Taylor Swift “Only the Young” (DG: 1)
  5. 2/23: Dua Lipa “Don’t Start Now” (BA: 4, RR: 6)
  6. 2/29: Billie Eilish “No Time to Die” (DG: 1)

  7. 3/7: BTS “On” (DG: 1)
  8. 3/14: Lady Gaga “Stupid Love” (DG: 1)
  9. 3/21: Demi Lovato “I Love Me” (DG: 1)
  10. 3/28: The Weeknd “Blinding Lights” (BB: 4, BA: 26, DG: 4, ST: 1, RR: 7)

  11. 4/4: Kenny Rogers “The Gambler” (DG: 1)
  12. 4/5: Hary Styles “Adore You” (RR: 1)
  13. 4/18: Drake “Toosie Slide” (BB: 1, ST: 3)

  14. 5/3: Camila Cabello with DaBaby “My Oh My” (RR: 1)
  15. 5/9: Travis Scott with Kid Cudi as the Scotts “The Scotts” (BB: 1, DG: 1, ST: 1)
  16. 5/10: Doja Cat “Say So” (BB: 1, DG: 1, RR: 5)
  17. 5/16: Megan Thee Stallion with Beyoncé “Savage” (BB: 1, DG: 3, ST: 1)
  18. 5/23: Ariana Grande with Justin Bieber “Stuck with U” (BB: 1, DG: 1)
  19. 5/23: 6ix9ine “Gooba” (ST: 1)
  20. 5/30: DaBaby with Roddy Ricch “Rockstar” (BB: 7, ST: 10)

  21. 6/6: Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande “Rain on Me” (BB: 1, DG: 1)
  22. 6/21: Justin Bieber with Quavo “Intentions” (RR: 1)
  23. 6/27: 6ix9ine with Nicki Minaj “Trollz” (BB: 1, DG: 1)

  24. 7/4: Beyoncé “Black Parade” (DG: 1)
  25. 7/11: Kanye West with Travis Scott “Wash Us in the Blood” (DG: 1)
  26. 7/18: Lee Greenwood “God Bless the U.S.A.” (DG: 1)
  27. 7/19: Trevor Daniel “Falling” (RR: 1)
  28. 7/25: Juice Wrld with Marshmello “Come & Go” (ST: 1)
  29. 7/25: Kid Cudi with Eminem “The Adventures of Moon Man & Slim Shady” (DG: 1)
  30. 7/26: Dua Lipa “Break My Heart” (RR: 1)

  31. 8/1: DJ Khaled with Drake “Popstar” (DG: 1)
  32. 8/2: Harry Styles “Watermelon Sugar” (BB: 1, DG: 1, RR: 7)
  33. 8/8: Taylor Swift “Cardigan” (BB: 1, DG: 1, ST: 1)
  34. 8/22: Cardi B with Megan Thee Stallion “WAP” (BB: 4, DG: 2, ST: 10)
  35. 8/29: Drake with Lil Durk “Laugh Now Cry Later” (ST: 1)

  36. 9/5: BTS “Dynamite” (B: 3, DG: 18)
  37. 9/20: Lewis Capaldi “Before You Go” (BA: 1, RR: 2)

  38. 10/4: Jawsh 685 with Jason Derulo “Savage Love (Laxed – Siren Beat)” (BB: 1, RR: 3)
  39. 10/10: Travis Scott with Young Thug & M.I.A. “Franchise” (BB: 1)
  40. 10/24: 24K Goldn with Iann Dior “Mood” (BB: 8, BA: 11, ST: 2, RR: 8)
  41. 10/31: Gabby Barrett with Charlie Puth “I Hope” (BA: 1)

  42. 11/7: Ariana Grande “Positions” (BB: 1, ST: 2, RR: 5)
  43. 11/7: Luke Combs “Forever After All” (DG: 1)
  44. 11/21: Mike Will Made It with Nicki Minaj & YoungBoy Never Broke Again “What That Speed Bout!?” (DG: 1)
  45. 11/28: Billie Eilish “Therefore I Am” (ST: 1, RR: 2)
  46. 11/28: Phoebe Bridgers & Maggie Rogers “Iris” (DG: 1)

  47. 12/5: BTS “Life Goes On” (BB: 1, DG: 3)
  48. 12/5: Megan Thee Stallion “Body” (ST: 1)
  49. 12/26: Taylor Swift “Willow” (BB: 1, DG: 1)

2021:

  1. 1/16: Justin Bieber “Anyone” (DG: 1 week)
  2. 1/23: Olivia Rodrigo “Drivers License” (BB: 8, BA: 5, DG: 3, ST: 4, RR: 6)
  3. 1/23: Chris Brown with Young Thug “Go Crazy” (BA: 8)

  4. 2/7: Justin Bieber & Benny Blanco “Lonely” (RR: 1)
  5. 2/13: Tom MacDonald “Fake Woke” (DG: 1)
  6. 2/20: Cardi B “Up” (BB: 1, DG: 1, ST: 2)
  7. 2/21: Ariana Grande “34+35” (RR: 2)
  8. 2/27: Lil Tjay & 6lack “Calling My Phone” (ST: 2)
  9. 2/27: Taylor Swift “Love Story (Taylor’s Version)” (DG: 1)

  10. 3/20: Drake “What’s Next” (BB: 1, ST: 2)

  11. 4/3: Justin Bieber with Daniel Caesar & Giveon “Peaches” (BB: 1, ST: 1)
  12. 4/10: Lil Nas X “Montero (Call Me by Your Name)” (BB: 1, DG: 1, ST: 2)
  13. 4/17: Bruno Mars and Anderson.Paak as Silk Sonic “Leave the Door Open” (BB: 1, BA: 1)
  14. 4/17: BTS “Film Out” (DG: 1)
  15. 4/18: Tate McRae “You Broke Me First” (RR: 1)
  16. 4/24: Polo G “Rapstar” (BB: 2, ST: 1)
  17. 4/25: The Weeknd “Save Your Tears” (RR: 2)

  18. 5/1: Gabby Barrett “The Good Ones” (DG: 1)

Resources/Related Links:

First posted 2/24/2021; last updated 4/29/2021.

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Jazz: Top 100 Songs of All Time

Jazz:

Top 100 Songs

This is an aggregate of 30 lists (see sources at the bottom of the page) focused on the best jazz songs of all time. Many of these were not originally jazz compositions and have higher-ranked versions in Dave’s Music Database. As such, the listings here are not necessarily the most popular versions of the song, but the one attributed specifically to a jazz artist.

Click here to see other genre-specific song lists.

1. Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong “Summertime” (1957)
2. Dave Brubeck “Take Five” (1961)
3. Duke Ellington “Take the ‘A’ Train” (1941)
4. Coleman Hawkins “Body and Soul” (1940)
5. Thelonious Monk “‘Round Midnight” (1947)
6. Miles Davis “So What” (1959)
7. Louis Armstrong “What a Wonderful World” (1967)
8. Stan Getz with Joao Gilberto “The Girl from Ipanema” (1964)
9. Dizzy Gillespie “A Night in Tunisia” (1946)
10. Cannonball Adderley “Autumn Leaves” (1958)

11. Benny Goodman “Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)” (1938)
12. Billie Holiday “Strange Fruit” (1939)
13. Frank Sinatra “Fly Me to the Moon (In Other Words)” (1964)
14. Ray Charles “Georgia on My Mind” (1960)
15. Erroll Garner Trio “Misty” (1954)
16. Glenn Miller “In the Mood” (1939)
17. Miles Davis “All Blues” (1959)
18. John Coltrane “Acknowledgement (A Love Supreme, Part I)” (1965)
19. John Coltrane “My Favorite Things” (1960)
20. Miles Davis “Blue in Green” (1959)

21. Weather Report “Birdland” (1977)
22. Fats Waller “Ain’t Misbehavin’” (1929)
23. Duke Ellington “Sophisticated Lady” (1933)
24. Duke Ellington & John Coltrane “In a Sentimental Mood” (1962)
25. Bessie Smith & Louis Armstrong “St. Louis Blues” (1925)
26. Duke Ellington “Mood Indigo“ (1931)
27. Louis Armstrong “West End Blues” (1928)
28. Count Basie Orchestra “One O’Clock Jump” (1937)
29. Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers “Moanin’” (1958)
30. Etta James “At Last” (1961)

31. Benny Goodman “Stompin’ at the Savoy” (1936)
32. Duke Ellington “Satin Doll” (1953)
33. John Coltrane “Giant Steps” (1959)
34. Dizzy Gillespie “All the Things You Are” (1945)
35. Louis Armstrong “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1933)
36. Artie Shaw “Stardust” (1941)
37. Dizzy Gillespie “Salt Peanuts” (1945)
38. Duke Ellington “It Don’t Mean a Thing if It Ain’t Got That Swing” (1932)
39. Glenn Miller “Moonlight Serenade” (1939)
40. Louis Armstrong “I Got Rhythm” (1932)

41. Dizzy Gillespie “Manteca” (1947)
42. Peggy Lee “Fever” (1957)
43. Cab Calloway “Minnie the Moocher” (1931)
44. Ella Fitzgerald “The Man I Love” (1959)
45. Ella Fitzgerald “Mack the Knife“ (1960)
46. Artie Shaw “Begin the Beguine” (1938)
47. Ella Fitzgerald “Night and Day” (1956)
48. Herbie Hancock “Watermelon Man” (1962)
49. Duke Ellington “Caravan” (1937)
50. Count Basie “April in Paris” (1955)

51. Paul Whitman with George Gershwin “Rhapsody in Blue” (1924)
52. John Coltrane & Johnny Hartman “Lush Life” (1963)
53. Louis Armstrong “Sweet Georgia Brown” (1955)
54. Billie Holiday “God Bless the Child” (1941)
55. Louis Armstrong “All of Me” (1932)
56. Ella Fitzgerald with the Daydreamers “How High the Moon” (1947)
57. Art Tatum “Tea for Two” (1939)
58. Natalie Cole with Nat “King” Cole “Unforgettable” (1991)
59. Glenn Miller “The Nearness of You” (1940)
60. Norah Jones “Don’t Know Why” (2002)

61. Charlie Parker with Miles Davis & Dizzy Gillespie “Ko-Ko” (1945)
62. Louis Armstrong “When the Saints Go Marching In” (1939)
63. Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong “Cheek to Cheek” (1956)
64. Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton “King Porter Stomp” (1923)
65. Billie Holiday “The Way You Look Tonight” (1936)
66. Fats Waller “Honeysuckle Rose” (1935)
67. Ella Fitzgerald “Someone to Watch Over Me” (1958)
68. Ray Charles “Come Rain or Come Shine” (1960)
69. Henry Mancini with Audrey Hepburn “Moon River” (1961)
70. Ella Fitzgerald with Chick Webb “A-Tisket, A-Tasket” (1938)

71. Bill Withers with Grover Washington, Jr. “Just the Two of Us” (1981)
72. Dizzy Gillespie “I Can’t Get Started” (1945)
73. Louis Armstrong “I’m in the Mood for Love” (1935)
74. Billie Holiday “Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)” (1945)
75. Benny Goodman “Moonglow” (1934)
76. Louis Armstrong “Hello Dolly!” (1964)
77. Benny Goodman with Mildred Bailey “Darn That Dream” (1940)
78. Woody Herman “Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol’ Me)” (1941)
79. Pee Wee Hunt “Twelfth Street Rag” (1948)
80. Nat “King” Cole “Mona Lisa” (1950)

81. Woody Herman “Laura” (1945)
82. Nat “King” Cole “Straighten Up and Fly Right” (1944)
83. Artie Shaw “Dancing in the Dark” (1941)
84. Bobby McFerrin “Don’t Worry Be Happy” (1988)
85. Lionel Hampton “Flying Home” (1942)
86. Frank Sinatra “One for My Baby and One for the Road” (1949)
87. Dinah Washington “What a Diff’rence a Day Makes” (1959)
88. Ella Fitzgerald “But Not for Me” (1959)
89. Tommy Dorsey “Opus One” (1943)
90. Charlie Barnet & His Orchestra “Cherokee (Indian Love Song)” (1939)

91. Duke Ellington “Perdido” (1942)
92. Chet Baker “My Funny Valentine” (1953)
93. Woody Herman “I’ll Remember April” (1942)
94. George Benson “On Broadway” (live, 1978)
95. George Benson “This Masquerade” (1976)
96. Stan Kenton “Artistry in Rhythm” (1944)
97. Herb Alpert “Rise” (1979)
98. Stan Getz & Charlie Bird “Desafinado” (1962)
99. Louis Armstrong “Potato Head Blues” (1927)
100. Django Reinhardt & Stephane Grappelli with the Quintet of the Hot Club of France “Nuages” (1940)


Resources and Related Links:

First posted 3/3/2011; last updated 4/22/2021.

Monday, April 19, 2021

Jim Steinman: Top 25 Songs

Jim Steinman

Image from BBC.com

Composer, lyricist, playright, and record producer born 11/1/1947 in New York City, NY. Died 4/19/2021. Started in musical theatre, but found his greatest fame when he teamed with Meat Loaf to write songs for the legendary Bat Out of Hell in 1977. He also returned to Broadway, teaming with Andrew Lloyd Webber for the musical Whistle Down the Wind. His repertoire has sold more than 190 million records.

Awards:


Top 25 Songs Written by Jim Steinman


Dave’s Music Database lists are determined by song’s appearances on best-of lists as well as chart success, sales, radio airplay, streaming, and awards. This list is focused only on songs which charted in some fashion so it doesn’t include any album cuts. Also – only the highest-ranked version of the each song is included. #1 songs are noted. (Click for codes to singles charts.)

DMDB Top 1%:

1. Meat Loaf “I’d Do Anything for Love (But I Won’t Do That)” (1993) #1 US, CB, UK, CN, AU
2. Bonnie Tyler “Total Eclipse of the Heart” (1983) #1 US, CB, RR, UK, CN, AU

DMDB Top 2%:

3. Meat Loaf “Paradise by the Dashboard Lights” (1977) #1 CL
4. Celine Dion “It’s All Coming Back to Me Now” (1996) #1 CB, AC, CN

DMDB Top 5%:

5. Meat Loaf “Bat Out of Hell” (1977)
6. Meat Loaf “Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad” (1977)
7. Air Supply “Making Love Out of Nothing at All” (1983)

DMDB Top 10%:

8. Boyzone “No Matter What” (1997) #1 UK
9. Meat Loaf “You Took the Words Right Out of My Mouth” (1977)
10. Meat Loaf “Rock and Roll Dreams Come Through” (1993)
11. Barry Manilow “Read ‘Em and Weep” (1983) #1 AC

DMDB Top 20%:

12. Bonnie Tyler “Holding Out for a Hero” (1984)
13. Meat Loaf “Objects in the Rear View Mirror May Appear Closer Than They Are” (1993)
14. Sisters of Mercy “More” (1990) #1 MR

Beyond the DMDB Top 20%:

15. Fire Inc. “Tonight Is What It Means to Be Young” (1984)
16. Meat Loaf & Cher “Dead Ringer for Love’ (1981)
17. Meat Loaf “I’m Gonna Love Her for Both of Us” (1981)
18. Meat Loaf “Life Is a Lemon and I Want My Money Back” (1993)
19. Barbra Striesand “Left in the Dark” (1984)
20. Bonnie Tyler & Todd Rundgren “Loving You’s a Dirty Job But Somebody’s Gotta Do It” (1985)
21. Meat Loaf “Nowhere Fast” (1984)
22. Tina Arena “Whistle Down the Wind” (1997)
23. Meat Loaf “Is Nothing Sacred” (1998)
24. Taylor Dayne “Original Sin” (1995)
25. Bonnie Tyler “Faster Than the Speed of Night” (1983)


Resources and Related Links:

First posted 4/29/2021.

Big Band: Top 100 Songs

Big Band:

Top 100 Songs

Big Band, or Swing music, was especially popular in the 1930s and ‘40s. They were generally jazz-oriented orchestras led by such dominant names as Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, and Glenn Miller. In fact, more than 20 of these songs also appear on the DMDB’s Top 100 Jazz Songs list.

This list was created by aggregating 21 lists focused on big band songs.

Click here to see other genre-specific song lists.

1. Duke Ellington “Take the ‘A’ Train” (1941)
2. Benny Goodman “Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)” (1938)
3. Glenn Miller “In the Mood” (1939)
4. Glenn Miller “A String of Pearls” (1942)
5. Glenn Miller with Tex Beneke & the Four Modernaires “Chattanooga Choo Choo” (1941)
6. Artie Shaw “Begin the Beguine” (1938)
7. Artie Shaw “Stardust” (1941)
8. Glenn Miller “Tuxedo Junction” (1940)
9. The Andrews Sisters with Vic Schoen’s Orchestra “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy” (1941)
10. Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra “I’ll Never Smile Again” (1940)

11. Glenn Miller “Moonlight Serenade” (1939)
12. Fats Waller “Ain’t Misbehavin’” (1929)
13. Benny Goodman “Stompin’ at the Savoy” (1936)
14. Jimmy Dorsey with Bob Eberly “Tangerine” (1942)
15. Tommy Dorsey “Opus One” (1945)
16. Les Brown’s Orchestra with Doris Day “Sentimental Journey” (1945)
17. Count Basie “One O’Clock Jump” (1937)
18. Woody Herman “At the Woodchoppers’ Ball” (1939)
19. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1930)
20. Bobby Darin “Mack the Knife” (1959)

21. Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter’s Orchestra “I’ll Be Seeing You” (1944)
22. Duke Ellington with Ivie Anderson “It Don’t Mean a Thing if It Ain’t Got That Swing” (1932)
23. Rosemary Clooney “Tenderly” (1952)
24. Cab Calloway “Minnie the Moocher (The Ho Do Ho Song)” (1931)
25. Duke Ellington “Perdido” (1942)
26. Fred Astaire with Leo Reisman’s Orchestra “Night and Day” (1932)
27. Coleman Hawkins “Body and Soul” (1940)
28. Glenn Miller “Pennsylvania 6-5000” (1940)
29. Billie Holiday with Camarata’s Orchestra “Lover Man (Oh, Where Can You Be?)” (1945)
30. Woody Herman “Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol’ Me)” (1941)

31. Tommy Dorsey “I’m Getting Sentimental Over You” (1936)
32. Glen Gray “Sunrise Serenade” (1939)
33. Charlie Barnet “Skyliner” (1944)
34. Lionel Hampton “Flying Home” (1940)
35. Benny Goodman “Moonglow” (1934)
36. Jimmy Dorsey with Bob Eberly & Helen O’Connell “Green Eyes (Aquellos Ojos Verdes)” (1941)
37. Glenn Miller with Tex Beneke & Marion Hutton “I’ve Got a Gal in Kalamazoo” (1942)
38. Charlie Barnet “Cherokee (Indian Love Song)” (1939)
39. Duke Ellington “Caravan” (1937)
40. Harry James “You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It)” (1941)

41. Bing Crosby “White Christmas” (1942)
42. Judy Garland “Over the Rainbow” (1939)
43. Billie Holiday “Summertime” (1936)
44. The Andrews Sisters “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen (Means That You're Grand)” (1938)
45. Ella Fitzgerald with Chick Webb “A-Tisket, A-Tasket” (1938)
46. Bunny Berigan “I Can’t Get Started” (1938)
47. Marion Harris “The Man I Love” (1928)
48. Paul Whiteman “Oh, Lady Be Good” (1925)
49. Duke Ellington “Mood Indigo“ (1931)
50. Count Basie “April in Paris” (1956)

51. Billie Holiday “God Bless the Child” (1941)
52. Cab Calloway “Hep! Hep! The Jumpin’ Jive” (1939)
53. Harry James with Frank Sinatra “All or Nothing at All” (1939)
54. Walter Huston “September Song” (1939)
55. Duke Ellington “Satin Doll” (1953)
56. Benny Goodman with Peggy Lee “Why Don’t You Do Right?” (1943)
57. Glenn Miller with Marion Hutton, Tex Beneke, & the Modernaires “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree with Anyone Else But Me” (1942)
58. Tommy Dorsey with the Pied Pipers “Let’s Get Away from It All” (1941)
59. Duke Ellington “Solitude” (1934)
60. Paul Whiteman “Song of India” (1921)

61. Benny Goodman “Don’t Be That Way” (1938)
62. Count Basie “Jumpin’ at the Woodside” (1938)
63. Tommy Dorsey with Jo Stafford & Sy Oliver “Yes Indeed!” (1941)
64. Teddy Wilson “Sweet Lorraine” (1935)
65. Johnny Mercer with Jo Stafford & the Pied Pipers “Candy” (1945)
66. Glenn Miller “Skylark” (1942)
67. Ethel Waters “Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)” (1933)
68. Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard “All the Things You Are” (1939)
69. The Andrews Sisters “Rum and Coca-Cola” (1945)
70. Larry Clinton with Bea Wain “Deep Purple” (1939)

71. Artie Shaw “Frenesi” (1940)
72. Jelly Roll Morton “King Porter Stomp” (1923)
73. Dick Haymes with Victor Young’s Orchestra “It Might As Well Be Spring” (1945)
74. Nat “King” Cole with Frank DeVol’s Orchestra “Nature Boy” (1948)
75. Hal Kemp with Bob Allen “Where or When” (1937)
76. Ella Fitzgerald & the Delta Rhythm Boys “It’s Only a Paper Moon” (1945)
77. Roger Wolfe Kahn “Sometimes I’m Happy” (1927)
78. Dooley Wilson “As Time Goes By” (1942)
79. Nat “King” Cole “Straighten Up and Fly Right” (1944)
80. Artie Shaw “Dancing in the Dark” (1941)

81. Nat “King” Cole “Get Your Kicks on Route 66” (1946)
82. Johnny Mercer & the Pied Pipers “On the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe” (1945)
83. Judy Garland with Georgie Stoll’s Orchestra “The Trolley Song” (1944)
84. Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard “Marie” (1937)
85. Glenn Miller with Ray Eberle “Fools Rush in Where Angels Fear to Tread” (1940)
86. Benny Goodman with Martha Tilton “And the Angels Sing” (1939)
87. Fred Astaire with Leo Reisman’s Orchestra “Cheek to Cheek” (1935)
88. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “I’m in the Mood for Love” (1935)
89. Earl Burtnett with Harry Richman “Puttin’ on the Ritz” (1930)
90. Paul Whitman with George Gershwin “Rhapsody in Blue” (1924)

91. Kate Smith “The Last Time I Saw Paris” (1940)
92. Duke Ellington “Sophisticated Lady” (1933)
93. Perry Como with Russel Case’s Orchestra “If I Loved You” (1945)
94. The Ink Spots “Don’t Get Around Much Anymore” (1943)
95. Horace Heidt with Larry Cotton, Donna Wood, & Don Juans “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire’ (1941)
96. Harry James with Helen Forrest “I’ve Heard That Song Before” (1943)
97. Benny Goodman with Helen Forrest “Taking a Chance on Love” (1940)
98. Louis Jordan “Choo Choo Ch’ Boogie” (1946)
99. Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra “Oh, Look at Me Now” (1941)
100. Nat “King” Cole “The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)” (1946)


Resources and Related Links:

First posted 4/18/2021; last updated 4/19/2021.

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Variety Magazine: Golden 100 Songs

Variety Magazine:

Golden 100 Songs

Variety Magazine came up with a listing of what it called the “Golden 100.” The songs were listed in alphabetical order by title and no specific artist was noted. For this DMDB version of the list, the artist with the highest-ranked version of each song is noted and the songs have been ranked in order by their DMDB rating. There’s no indication when this list was done, but it covers songs from 1906-1959.

Click here to see lists from other publications and/or organizations

1. Bing Crosby with the Ken Darby Singers “White Christmas” (1942)
2. Judy Garland “Over the Rainbow” (1939)
3. Arthur Collins with Byron Harlan “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911)
4. Fred Astaire with Leo Reisman’s Orchestra “Night and Day” (1932)
5. Gene Austin “My Blue Heaven” (1927)
6. Artie Shaw “Stardust” (1941)
7. Artie Shaw “Begin the Beguine” (1938)
8. Al Jolson “April Showers” (1922)
9. Bessie Smith with Louis Armstrong “St. Louis Blues” (1925)
10. Ethel Waters “Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)” (1933)

11. Al Jolson “Swanee” (1920)
12. Dooley Wilson “As Time Goes By” (1942)
13. Peerless Quartet “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” (1911)
14. Gene Autry with the Pinafores “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” (1949)
15. Coleman Hawkins “Body and Soul” (1940)
16. Bing Crosby with George Stoll’s Orchestra “Pennies from Heaven” (1936)
17. Billy Murray with the Haydn Quartet “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (1908)
18. Paul Whiteman with Bob Lawrence “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” (1933)
19. The Harmonicats “Peg O’ My Heart” (1947)
20. Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard “All the Things You Are” (1939)

21. Byron Harlan “School Days (When We Were a Couple of Kids)” (1907)
22. Al Jolson “You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It)” (1913)
23. Original Dixieland Jazz Band “Tiger Rag” (1918)
24. Paul Robeson “Ol’ Man River” (1928)
25. Ben Selvin “Happy Days Are Here Again” (1930)
26. Bing Crosby with John Scott Trotter’s Orchestra “I’ll Be Seeing You” (1944)
27. Marion Harris “After You’ve Gone” (1919)
28. Les Paul with Mary Ford “How High the Moon” (1951)
29. Kate Smith “God Bless America” (1939)
30. Harry MacDonough with Elise Stevenson (as Miss Walton) “Shine on, Harvest Moon” (1909)

31. Sophie Tucker “Some of These Days” (1911)
32. Marion Harris “Tea for Two” (1925)
33. Marion Harris “The Man I Love” (1928)
34. Judy Garland with Gene Kelly “For Me and My Gal” (1942)
35. Billie Holiday “Summertime” (1936)
36. Cliff Edwards “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” (1928)
37. George Olsen with Fran Frey, Bob Rice, & Edward Joyce “Always” (1926)
38. Heidelberg Quintet “Waiting for the Robert E. Lee” (1912)
39. Byron Harlan “Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie” (1906)
40. Count Basie “April in Paris” (1956)

41. Woody Herman “Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol’ Me)” (1941)
42. Ted Weems with Elmo Tanner “Heartaches” (1947)
43. Henry Burr “I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now” (1909)
44. Arthur Collins with Byron Harlan “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” (1918)
45. Glen Gray with Kenny Sargent “Blue Moon” (1935)
46. Red Nichols “I Got Rhythm” (1930)
47. Rosemary Clooney “Tenderly” (1952)
48. Perry Como “Some Enchanted Evening” (1949)
49. Little Jack Little “I’m in the Mood for Love” (1935)
50. Walter Huston “September Song” (1939)

51. Ted Lewis “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1930)
52. That Old Black Magic…Glenn Miller with Skip Nelson (1943)
53. Gene Austin “My Melancholy Baby” (1928)
54. Ray Noble “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (1936)
55. Ruth Etting “Love Me Or Leave Me” (1929)
56. Bing Crosby with the Mills Brothers “Dinah” (1932)
57. Paul Whiteman with Jack Fulton “Lover” (1933)
58. Wayne King with Ernie Birchill “Goodnight Sweetheart” (1931)
59. The Victory Military Band “Poor Butterfly” (1917)
60. Prince’s Orchestra “Ballin’ the Jack” (1914)

61. Dinah Washington “What a Diff’rence a Day Makes” (1959)
62. John Steel “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody” (1919)
63. Bill Snyder “Bewitched, Bothered & Bewildered” (1950)
64. Artie Shaw “Dancing in the Dark” (1941)
65. Paul Whiteman “Somebody Loves Me” (1924)
66. Paul Whiteman with Jack Fulton, Charles Gaylord, & Austin Young “The Birth of the Blues” (1926)
67. Dick Haymes “It Might As Well Be Spring” (1945)
68. Benny Goodman with Helen Ward “These Foolish Things Remind Me of You” (1936)
69. Fred & Tom Waring “Ah! Sweet Mystery of Life” (1928)
70. Leo Reisman “What Is This Thing Called Love?” (1930)

71. Al Jolson “All Alone” (1925)
72. George Olsen “Who?” (1926)
73. Ethel Merman “I Get a Kick Out of You” (1935)
74. Guy Lombardo with Carmen Lombardo How Deep Is the Ocean?” (1932)
75. Ben Selvin “Chicago (That Toddlin’ Town)” (1922)
76. Isham Jones with Ray Miller & Frank Bessinger “I’ll See You in My Dreams” (1925)
77. Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard “Marie” (1937)
78. Ben Pollack with Franklyn Baur “Sweet Sue, Just You” (1928)
79. Paul Whiteman with Jack Fulton “Lover Come Back to Me” (1929)
80. Ruth Etting “Exactly Like You” (1930)

81. Richard Himber with Stuart Allen “Just One of Those Things” (1935)
82. Edith Piaf “La Vie En Rose” (1950)
83. Frank Sinatra “You’ll Never Walk Alone” (1945)
84. Hal McIntyre “My Funny Valentine” (1945)
85. Margaret Whiting “Come Rain or Come Shine” (1946)
86. Leo Reisman with Clifton Webb “Easter Parade” (1933)
87. Roger Wolfe Kahn “Sometimes I’m Happy” (1927)
88. Larry Clinton with Bea Wain “You Go to My Head” (1938)
89. Paul Whiteman with Al Rinker, Jack Fulton, Charles Gaylord, & Austin Young “My Heart Stood Still” (1928)
90. Cab Calloway “I’ve Got the World on a String” (1932)

91. Frankie Laine “I Believe” (1953)
92. Paul Whiteman with Bing Crosby “Without a Song” (1929)
93. Paul Whiteman with Bing Crosby “Great Day” (1929)
94. Leo Reisman with Ran Weeks “With a Song in My Heart” (1929)
95. Glenn Miller “The Nearness of You” (1940)
96. Sarah Vaughn “S’ Wonderful” (1927)
97. Julie Andrews “I Could Have Danced All Night” (1956)
98. Olive Kline “Kiss Me Again” (1916)
99. Nat Shilkret with Phil Dewey, Frank Luter, & Leo O’Rourke “Get Happy” (1930)
100. Judy Garland “Zing! Went the Strings of My Heart” (1943)


Resources and Related Links:

First posted 8/1/2014; last updated 4/17/2021.

Tin Pan Alley: Top 100 Songs

Tin Pan Alley:

Top 100 Songs

Tin Pan Alley is a reference to a collection of late 19th century and early 20th century music publishers and songwriters in New York City, specifically West 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenues in Manhattan. The era is generally marked as starting in 1885 when a number of music publishers first set up shop in the area. Some consider the start of the Great Depression in the 1930s to mark the ending – a time when sheet music was no longer the driving force for American popular music, but a time when the phonograph, radio, and movies had more influence. Others consider the movement to have lasted into the 1950s when it was upstated by the rise of rock & roll and the subsequent influence of writers from the Brill Building. Some of the the most significant Tin Pan Alley writers were Harold Arlen, Irving Berlin, George M. Cohan, George Gershwin, Ira Gershwin, Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern, Frank Loesser, Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, and Albert Von Tilzer. The phrase, however, has come to be associated more broadly with commercially successful music of the early 20th century.

This list was creating by aggregating 18 lists and giving extra weight to songs which fell between 1885 and 1933 and were written by one of the significant songwriters specifically associated with the Tin Pan Alley era. Songs are listed with the songwriters and first year the song emerged. These songs have largely become standards; more than half of them appear on the DMDB list of the top 100 American Songbook Standards .

Click here to see other genre-specific song lists.

1. Irving Berlin “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911)
2. Jack Norworth and Albert von Tilzer “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (1908)
3. Jack Norworth and Nora Bayes “Shine on, Harvest Moon” (1908)
4. Shelton Brooks “Some of These Days” (1910)
5. Milton Ager and Jack Yellen “Ain’t She Sweet?” (1927)
6. Leo Friedman and Beth Slater Whitson “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” (1910)
7. Shelton Brooks “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” (1917)
8. Ren Shields and George Evans “In the Good Old Summertime” (1902)
9. Irving Berlin “God Bless America” (1939)
10. Charles K. Harris “After the Ball” (1892)

11. George M. Cohan “Give My Regards to Broadway” (1904)
12. Edward Madden and Gus Edwards “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” (1909)
13. Joseph E. Howard and Ida Emerson “Hello Ma Baby” (1899)
14. Alfred Bryan and Fred Fisher “Peg O’ My Heart” (1913)
15. George Gershwin and Irving Caesar “Swanee” (1920)
16. George M. Cohan “Over There” (1917)
17. John Schonberger, Richard Coburn, and Vincent Rose “Whispering” (1920)
18. Milton Ager and Jack Yellen “Happy Days Are Here Again” (1930)
19. Hughie Cannon and Johnnie Queen “Bill Bailey, Won’t You Please Come Home” (1902)
20. Harry Von Tilzer and William Dillon “I Want a Girl Just Like the Girl Who Married Dear Old Dad” (1911)

21. Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks “All of Me” (1931)
22. Walter Donaldson and George A. Whiting “My Blue Heaven” (1927)
23. Edward Madden and Percy Wenrich “Moonlight Bay” (1912)
24. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1930)
25. Spencer Williams and Jack Palmer “Everybody Loves My Baby” (1924)
26. Jimmy Monaco and Joseph McCarthy “You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It)” (1913)
27. Irving Berlin “Cheek to Cheek” (1935)
28. Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish “Stardust” (1927)
29. W.C. Handy “St. Louis Blues” (1914)
30. Theodore August Metz and Joe Hayden “A Hot Time in the Old Town” (1896)

31. Ben Bernie, Kenneth Casey, and Maceo Pinkard “Sweet Georgia Brown” (1925)
32. Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell “Georgia on My Mind” (1930)
33. Irving Berlin “Always” (1926)
34. Harry Akst, Sam M. Lewis, and Joe Young “Dinah” (1932)
35. Ray Henderson and Mort Dixon “Bye Bye Blackbird” (1926)
36. Joseph E. Howard, Harold Orlob, Frank R. Adams, and Will M. Hough “I Wonder Who’s Kissing Her Now” (1909)
37. Fred Fisher and Alfred Bryan “Come Josephine in My Flying Machine” (1910)
38. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” (1928)
39. Nat D. Ayer and Seymour Brown “Oh You Beautiful Doll” (1911)
40. George Meyer, Edgar Leslie, and E. Ray Goetz “For Me and My Gal” (1917)

41. Harry Von Tilzer and Andrew B. Sterling “Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie” (1905)
42. Chris Smith and Jim (James Henry) Burris “Ballin’ the Jack” (1913)
43. Scott Joplin “The Entertainer” (1902)
44. Harry Von Tilzer and Arthur J. Lamb “A Bird in a Gilded Cage” (1900)
45. Cole Porter “Night and Day” (1932)
46. George and Ira Gershwin “I Got Rhythm” (1930)
47. Charles B. Lawlor and James W. Blake “The Sidewalks of New York” (1894)
48. Johnny Green, Eddie Heyman, Robert Sour, and Frank Eyton “Body and Soul” (1930)
49. Gus Kahn and Walter Donaldson “Carolina in the Morning” (1923)
50. Paul Dresser “On the Banks of the Wabash” (1897)

51. Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler “Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)” (1933)
52. Frank Silver and Irving Cohn “Yes! We Have No Bananas” (1923)
53. Turner Layton and Henry Creamer “After You’ve Gone” (1918)
54. W.C. Handy, George A. Norton, Charles Tobias, and Peter DeRose “The Memphis Blues” (1912)
55. Alfred Bryan and Al Piantadosi “I Didn’t Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier” (1915)
56. Ray Henderson, Sam Lewis, and Joe Young “Five Foot Two, Eyes of Blue” (1926)
57. Turner Layton and Henry Creamer “Way Down Yonder in New Orleans” (1922)
58. Gus Edwards and Will D. Cobb “School Days (When We Were a Couple of Kids)” (1907)
59. Buddy DeSylva and Louis Silvers “April Showers” (1922)
60. Tell Taylor “Down by the Old Mill Stream” (1910)

61. Joe Burke and Al Dubin “Tip Toe Through the Tulips” (1929)
62. Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn “Yes Sir! That’s My Baby” (1925)
63. Cole Porter “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (1936)
64. The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, Harry DeCosta “Tiger Rag” (1918)
65. George M. Cohan “You’re a Grand Old Flag (aka “The Grand Old Rag”)” (1906)
66. Isham Jones and Gus Kahn “I’ll See You in My Dreams” (1925)
67. Arthur B Sterling and Kerry Mills “Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis” (1904)
68. Cole Porter “I Get a Kick Out of You” (1934)
69. Mark Fisher, Joe Goodwin, and Larry Shay “When You’re Smiling, the Whole World Smiles with You” (1928)
70. Gus Edwards and Vincent Bryan “In My Merry Oldsmobile” (1902)

71. Victor Young and Will Harris “Sweet Sue, Just You” (1928)
72. George M. Cohan “Yankee Doodle Boy” (1905)
73. Fred Fisher “Chicago (That Toddlin’ Town)” (1922)
74. Johnny S. Black “Paper Doll” (1942)
75. Vincent Youmans and Irving Caesar “Tea for Two” (1925)
76. Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn “Makin’ Whoopee” (1928)
77. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “Blue Moon” (1935)
78. Arthur Johnson and Johnny Burke “Pennies from Heaven” (1936)
79. Irving Berlin “White Christmas” (1942)
80. Jean Kenbrovin and John William Kellette “I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles” (1919)

81. Richard H. Gerard and Harry Armstrong “Sweet Adeline (You’re the Flower of My Heart)” (1903)
82. Isham Jones and Gus Kahn “It Had to Be You” (1924)
83. Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” (1933)
84. Irving Berlin “Puttin’ on the Ritz” (1930)
85. Henry J. Sayers “Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay” (1891)
86. Scott Joplin “Maple Leaf Rag” (1899)
87. Herman Hupfield “As Time Goes By” (1931)
88. Daniel Decatur Emmett “Dixie” (1860)
89. Euday L. Bowman “Twelfth Street Rag” (1916)
90. George & Ira Gershwin “Summertime” (1935)

91. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II “Ol’ Man River” (1927)
92. Cole Porter “Begin the Beguine” (1935)
93. Sam M. Lewis, Joe Young, and Jean Schwartz “Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody” (1918)
94. Irving Berlin “Blue Skies” (1927)
95. Gus Kahn, Ernie Erdman, and Dan Russo “Toot Toot Tootsie (Goo-Bye!)” (1922)
96. Harry M. Woods “Side by Side” (1927)
97. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “My Funny Valentine” (1937)
98. George & Ira Gershwin “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” (1937)
99. Harold Arlen and E.Y. “Yip” Harburg “Over the Rainbow” (1939)
100. Hoagy Carmichael and Sidney Arodin “Lazy River” (1931)


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First posted 4/17/2021.

Friday, April 16, 2021

Standards of the American Songbook: Top 100

American Songbook Standards:

Top 100 Songs

Songs which have become known as standards or those comprising the great American songbook are generally popular songs from the early 20th century. These are songs from an era when songwriters were more at the forefront, penning songs for theater and film that were often recorded by multiple artists and spawned multiple chart versions.

This list has been created by aggregating 31 lists (see sources at the bottom of the page) which focused on 20th century song titles not recorded by any specific artist. Here are the top 100 songs listed with their songwriters and first year of appearance:

1. Irving Berlin “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911)
2. Cole Porter “Night and Day” (1932)
3. Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish “Stardust” (1927)
4. W.C. Handy “St. Louis Blues” (1914)
5. Irving Berlin “White Christmas” (1942)
6. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II “All the Things You Are” (1939)
7. Harold Arlen and E.Y. “Yip” Harburg “Over the Rainbow” (1939)
8. Cole Porter “Begin the Beguine” (1935)
9. George M. Cohan “Give My Regards to Broadway” (1904)
10. George M. Cohan “Over There” (1917)

11. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1930)
12. Fats Waller “Ain’t Misbehavin’” (1929)
13. George Gershwin and Irving Caesar “Swanee” (1920)
14. Isham Jones and Gus Kahn “It Had to Be You” (1924)
15. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” (1928)
16. Hughie Cannon and Johnnie Queen “Bill Bailey, Won’t You Please Come Home” (1902)
17. George and Ira Gershwin “I Got Rhythm” (1930)
18. Vincent Youmans and Irving Caesar “Tea for Two” (1925)
19. Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields “The Way You Look Tonight” (1936)
20. Cole Porter “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (1936)

21. Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II “Ol’ Man River” (1927)
22. Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” (1933)
23. Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler “Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)” (1933)
24. Irving Berlin “Cheek to Cheek” (1935)
25. Richard H. Gerard and Harry Armstrong “Sweet Adeline (You’re the Flower of My Heart)” (1903)
26. Duke Ellington, Mitchell Parish, and Irving Mills “Sophisticated Lady” (1933)
27. Gus Kahn, Raymond B. Egan, and Richard Whiting “Ain’t We Got Fun?” (1921)
28. Ernie Burnett and George A. Norton “My Melancholy Baby” (1928)
29. Gus Kahn and Walter Donaldson “Carolina in the Morning” (1923)
30. Kurt Weill, Mark Blitzstein, and Berthold Brecht “Mack the Knife” (1928)

31. Jack Norworth and Albert von Tilzer “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” (1908)
32. Jay Gorney and E.Y. “Yip” Harburg “Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?” (1932)
33. Duke Ellington “Mood Indigo” (1931)
34. Herman Hupfield “As Time Goes By” (1931)
35. Jimmy Monaco and Joseph McCarthy “You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It)” (1913)
36. George & Ira Gershwin “They Can’t Take That Away from Me” (1937)
37. Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer “Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol’ Me)” (1941)
38. George & Ira Gershwin “Someone to Watch Over Me” (1926)
39. Walter Donaldson and George A. Whiting “My Blue Heaven” (1927)
40. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “Manhattan” (1925)

41. Arthur B Sterling and Kerry Mills “Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis” (1904)
42. Irving Berlin “Blue Skies” (1927)
43. Vernon Duke and E.Y. “Yip” Harburg “April in Paris” (1932)
44. Jerome Kern and P.G. Wodehouse “They Didn't Believe Me” (1914)
45. George Meyer, Edgar Leslie, and E. Ray Goetz “For Me and My Gal” (1917)
46. traditional, adapted by Fred Weatherly “Danny Boy” (1913)
47. George M. Cohan “You’re a Grand Old Flag (aka “The Grand Old Rag”)” (1906)
48. Irving Berlin “God Bless America” (1939)
49. Edward Madden and Percy Wenrich “Moonlight Bay” (1912)
50. Irving Berlin “Always” (1926)

51. Harry H. Williams and Egbert Van Alstyne “In the Shade of the Old Apple Tree” (1905)
52. Harry Warren and Al Dubin “I Only Have Eyes for You” (1934)
53. Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson “September Song” (1905)
54. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “Blue Moon” (1935)
55. John Schonberger, Richard Coburn, and Vincent Rose “Whispering” (1920)
56. Shelton Brooks “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” (1917)
57. Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed “Singin’ in the Rain” (1929)
58. Johnny Green, Eddie Heyman, Robert Sour, and Frank Eyton “Body and Soul” (1930)
59. Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell “Georgia on My Mind” (1930)
60. Richard A. Whiting and Raymond B. Egan “Till We Meet Again” (1919)

61. Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields “I’m in the Mood for Love” (1935)
62. Andy Razaf and Joe Garland “In the Mood” (1939)
63. Buddy DeSylva and Louis Silvers “April Showers” (1922)
64. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “My Funny Valentine” (1937)
65. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “Lover” (1933)
66. Irving Berlin “Oh, How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning” (1918)
67. Fred Fisher “Chicago (That Toddlin’ Town)” (1922)
68. Cole Porter “Just One of Those Things” (1935)
69. Edward Madden and Gus Edwards “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” (1909)
70. George Powell (aka Charles Asaf) and Felix Powell “Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and Smile, Smile, Smile” (1915)

71. Alfred Bryan and Fred Fisher “Peg O’ My Heart” (1913)
72. Max Freedman and Jimmy DeKnight “We’re Gonna Rock Around the Clock” (1954)
73. Paul Dresser “My Gal Sal” (1905)
74. Richard Whiting “The Japanese Sandman” (1920)
75. Ren Shields and George Evans “In the Good Old Summertime” (1902)
76. Ren Shields and George Evans “In My Merry Oldsmobile” (1902)
77. Jack Norworth and Nora Bayes “Shine on, Harvest Moon” (1908)
78. Sam M. Lewis, Joe Young, and Jean Schwartz “Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody” (1918)
79. Milton Ager and Jack Yellen “Happy Days Are Here Again” (1930)
80. Leigh Harline and Ned Washington “When You Wish Upon a Star” (1940)

81. George M. Cohan “Yankee Doodle Boy” (1905)
82. Leo Friedman and Beth Slater Whitson “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” (1910)
83. Walter Donaldson and Gus Kahn “My Buddy” (1922)
84. George & Ira Gershwin “Summertime” (1935)
85. Shelton Brooks “Some of These Days” (1910)
86. Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer “That Old Black Magic” (1943)
87. Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered” (1941)
88. Vernon Duke and Ira Gershwin “I Can’t Get Started” (1938)
89. Walter Donaldson and Arthur Fields “The Aba Daba Honeymoon” (1914)
90. Cole Porter “I Get a Kick Out of You” (1934)

91. Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive” (1945)
92. Harry Warren and Al Dubin “42nd Street” (1933)
93. Jerome Kern and Ira Gershwin “Long Ago and Far Away” (1944)
94. Walter Gross and Jack Lawrence “Tenderly” (1947)
95. Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II “It Might As Well Be Spring” (1945)
96. Nat D. Ayer and Seymour Brown “Oh You Beautiful Doll” (1911)
97. Walter Donaldson, Sam Lewis, and Joy Young “My Mammy (The Sun Shines East, the Sun Shines West)” (1920)
98. George & Ira Gershwin “Embraceable You” (1930)
99. George & Ira Gershwin “The Man I Love” (1928)
100. Turner Layton and Henry Creamer “Way Down Yonder in New Orleans” (1922)


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First posted 4/11/2020; last updated 4/16/2020.

Ragtime: Top 50 Songs

Ragtime:

Top 50 Songs

Ragtime music was a largely piano-based form of music which reached its widest widest popularity between the mid-1890s and World War I. Its primary characteristic is, according to OxfordMusicOnline.com, “its ragged – i.e., syncopated rhythm.” OM This was, as ParlorSongs.com says, “usually in 2/4 time, over a regular, march tempo bass line.” PS The genre is significant as a predecessor to jazz.

16 lists were aggregated together (see sources at the bottom of the page). All songs appearing on 2+ lists were then sorted by overall DMDB points. The top 50 songs were then sorted by the most points on the ragtime lists. As to how the songs are listed – first up are the songwriters, followed by the title of the song and the year the song was introduced. When relevant, the performer(s) with the highest-ranked version of the song are listed in italics.

Ragtime purists will quibble with songs such as “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” that don’t adhere to strict definitions. I offer no apologies for such inclusions, as this list is meant to celebrate those tunes which introduced and shaped the craft as well as those which popularized the genre by integrating elements of ragtime.

Note: click here to see other genre-specific song lists.

“The Entertainer,” as performed by Marvin Hamlisch in the 1973 movie ‘The Sting’

1. Scott Joplin “Maple Leaf Rag” (1899): Vess Ossman, 1907)
2. Scott Joplin “The Entertainer” (1902)
3. Tom Turpin “Harlem Rag” (1897)
4. Eubie Blake “Charleston Rag” (1899)
5. Euday L. Bowman “Twelfth Street Rag” (1916): Pee Wee Hunt, 1948
6. Harry DeCosta, Original Dixieland Jazz Band “Tiger Rag” (1918)
7. Charles L. Johnson “Dill Pickles Rag” (1906): Arthur Pryor’s Band, 1910
8. James Scott “Climax Rag” (1913): Jelly Roll Morton, 1914
9. Irving Berlin “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911): Arthur Collins & Byron Harlan, 1911
10. Percy Wenrich “Peaches and Cream Rag” (1905): Len Spencer & Ada Jones, 1905

11. Scott Joplin “Elite Syncopations” (1902)
12. James Scott “Frog Legs Rag” (1906)
13. Joseph Lamb “Top Liner Rag” (1916)
14. Scott Joplin “Sunflower Slow Drag” (1901)
15. Scott Joplin “Weeping Willow” (1903)
16. Henry Lodge “Temptation Rag” (1909): Prince’s Orchestra, 1910
17. Hughie Cannon, Johnnie Queen “Bill Bailey, Won’t You Come Home” (1902): Arthur Collins, 1902
18. Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton “King Porter Stomp” (1923)
19. Kerry & F.A. Mills “At a Georgia Camp Meeting” (1897): Dan Quinn, 1898
20. Grant Clarke, Lewis F. Muir, & Maurice Abrahams “Ragtime Cowboy Joe” (1912): Bob Roberts, 1912

21. Ben R. Harney “Mister Johnson, Turn Me Loose” (1896)
22. W.C. Handy, George A. Norton, Charles Tobias, Peter DeRose “The Memphis Blues” (1912): Prince’s Orchestra, 1914
23. Abe Holzmann “Smoky Mokes” (1899): Len Spencer, 1899
24. Zez Confrey “Kitten on the Keys” (1921)
25. Charles Hunter “Tickled to Death” (1899)
26. Kerry & F.A. Mills “Whistling Rufus” (1899): Vess Ossman, 1899
27. Joseph E. Howard, Ida Emerson “Hello Ma Baby” (1899): Arthur Collins, 1899
28. Nat. D. Ayer, Seymour Brown “Oh You Beautiful Doll” (1911): Billy Murray & American Quartet, 1911
29. Theodore August Metz, Joe Hayden “A Hot Time in the Old Town” (1896): Dan Quinn, 1896
30. Bob Cole “Under the Bamboo Tree” (1902): Arthur Collins, 1902

31. Theodore Havermeyer Northrup “The Louisiana Rag” (1897)
32. John Philip Sousa “The Washington Post March” (1889): United States Marine Band, 1890)
33. W.C. Handy “St. Louis Blues” (1914): Bessie Smith & Louis Armstrong, 1925
34. James Reese Europe “Castle House Rag” (1914)
35. Spencer Williams, Jack Palmer “Everybody Loves My Baby” (1924): Aileen Stanley, 1925
36. Thomas Turpin “St. Louis Rag” (1903): Vess Ossman, 1905
37. James Reese Europe, Ford Dabney “The Castle Walk” (1914): Irene & Vernon Castle, 1914
38. traditional “Turkey in the Straw” (1820): Billy Golden, 1891 (1891)
39. Scott Joplin “Bethena (Ragtime Waltz)” (1905)
40. Scott Joplin “Swipesy Cake Walk” (1900)

41. Cecil Macklin “Tres Moutarde (Too Much Mustard)” (1911): Victor Military Band, 1911
42. George Sidney, J. Bodewell Lampe “Creole Belles” (1900): Metropolitan Orchestra, 1902
43. Thomas S. Allen “Any Rags?” (1903): Arthur Collins, 1903
44. W.C. Handy, Walter Hirsch “Joe Turner Blues” (1915): Prince’s Orchestra, 1916
45. Robert S. Roberts, Gene Jefferson “I’m Certainly Living a Ragtime Life” (1900): Fannie Midgely, 1900
46. Irving Berlin “That International Rag” (1913): Victor Military Band, 1914
47. Irving Berlin “I Want to Go Back to Michigan (Down on the Farm)” (1914): Eldia Morris, 1914
48. Tom Turpin “The Buffalo Rag” (1904): Vess Ossman, 1906
49. Scott Joplin “Scott Joplin’s New Rag” (1912)
50. Theron C. Bennett “St. Louis Tickle” (1904): Vess Ossman, 1910


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First posted 4/16/2021.

Kevin Gilbert box set Call Me Kai released

Call Me Kai

Kevin Gilbert


Released: April 18, 2021


Recorded: 1984-1987


Peak: --


Sales (in millions): --


Genre: progressive rock


Disc 1 (Decent Exposure ‘85):

  1. Suitcase Living [4:43]
  2. Staring into Nothing [6:01]
  3. Carpet Man [3:01]
  4. Simpler Times [5:38]
  5. Circling Winds [3:29]
  6. Walking in Your Shoes [5:24]
  7. Goodman Badman [4:35]
  8. Rain Suite: a) If I Ever Rain… [4:02]
  9. Rain Suite: b) Broken Ties [4:20]
  10. Welcome Home [4:29]

Disc 2 (Sometimes Why ‘86):

  1. Never Say Never [4:11]
  2. Another Day [4:59]
  3. Until I Get You Back [5:23]
  4. God’s Been Tapping My Phone [5:28]
  5. Image Maker [3:10]
  6. Livin’ in the U.S.A. [4:10]
  7. Child in Your Arms [5:04]
  8. One of Those Days [4:24]
  9. Tired Old Man Suite: a) Tired Old Man [3:58]
  10. Tired Old Man Suite: b) Terpsichorean [3:50]
  11. Tired Old Man Suite: c) Still Aire [0:34]
  12. Tired Old Man Suite: d) Back on the Shelf [0:54]

Disc 3 (Point Blank ‘87):

  1. Nightmares [4:47]
  2. Shannon Elizabeth [3:12]
  3. One Bad Habit [3:44]
  4. Goodbye L.A. [5:19]
  5. Staring into Nothing [4:46]
  6. Only 1 U Need [4:11]
  7. More for You [3:54]
  8. No Big Deal [3:32]
  9. Danarae [4:51]
  10. Suits Me Fine [5:06]

Disc 4 (Mixed Bag ’84-’87):

  1. B-Men 1 [1:08]
  2. Sherwood [2:24]
  3. Tersichorean [2:43]
  4. Sometimes Why [2:07]
  5. B-Men 2 [1:06]
  6. Tracy [4:44]
  7. Never Gonna Change [4:34]
  8. This Rain [5:28]
  9. Finale [1:55]
  10. Yo Yo Yo [4:09]
  11. Just Can’t Stand [4:01]
  12. Sail Away [5:21]

Rating:

2.222 out of 5.00 (average of 5 ratings)

About the Album:

This 4-CD box set covers recordings made by Kevin Gilbert from 1984 to 1987 between his years with NRG (1984) and Giraffe (1987-89). Gilbert adopted the stage name “Kai” in the mid-to-late ‘80s and made it a goal to create and distribute an album each year to his friends and family. As he said, “I made a rule for myself when I was fifteen and I got a job at a studio. I said, ‘Once a year I’m going to finish 10 songs, 45 minutes of music, and call it a record.” PP 25 years after his death, the estate of Kevin Gilbert has released this collection of recordings from that era.

In episode 5 of the Kevin Gilbert podcast, guest Mark McCrite said these were the albums as Gilbert initially conceived them. YH He and Wayne Perez, the KG estate archivist and host of the podcast, discuss how Kevin hadn’t intended his recordings prior to 1990’s Toy Matinee album to be distributed. However, McCrite notes that after Gilbert’s death, early recordings emerged which weren’t top-notch recordings and it made sense to rerelease quality versions of these songs.

McCrite comments throughout the podcast on select tracks. Regarding Simpler Times, from the Decent Exposure disc, noting that he liked the vocal, arrangement, and drum-machine programming, comparing the latter to Tears for Fears’ “Mad World.” YH

He also noted how Walking in Your Shoes has an intro inspired by the acapella harmony vocals from Yes’ “Leave It” and then a keyboard sequence similar to “Changes,” another cut from the Yes’ 90125 album. He also called the sax doubling with the bass at the end “Zappaesque.” YH

Perez says he hears a big shift in Gilbert’s music from the first disc to the second. Decent Exposure still had a similar sound to Gilbert’s 1984 NRG project while Sometimes Why showed more of his emerging abilities at production. McCrite also said he thought Gilbert’s songwriting showed notable improvement.

Perez refers to the Tired Old Man Suite as a “complex and multi-faceted track.” YH He notes that this song as well as Suits Me Fine were both performed live by Giraffe. McCrite compared “Tired Old Man” to the Who’s “A Quick One While He’s Away,” saying it was Gilbert’s mini-opera. YH Perez noted that the version that showed up later on 2009’s Nuts was initially intended for Gilbert’s 1995 Thud album.

They also talk about other songs on the collection which were recycled in later years, such as Staring into Nothing and Image Maker for The Shaming of the True.

There’s even one track, Terpsichorean, which is recycled three times within the Call Me Kai collection. It first appears on Decent Exposure as part of the “Tired Old Man Suite.” Then it shows up again on Mixed Bag under that title and again as Yo Yo Yo.

They also discuss the song Nightmares, which was recorded by the Motels’ Martha Davis for the soundtrack of Night of the Creeps. Perez says Giraffe’s Stan Cotey claims that Gilbert stripped Davis’ vocals and recorded his own for his version of the song. YH McCrite also notes the influence of Yes’ 90125 again where Gilbert uses samples at the end of the song from “Owner of a Lonely Heart.”

Perez explained that the fourth disc, Mixed Bag, showed where the seeds of Gilbert’s soundtrack work began. McCrite commented specifically on the song Sometimes Why, which Perez called “melancholy and casual.” YH McCrite thought the instrumental did a good job showcasing Gilbert’s specific style as a pianist. YH

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First posted 6/4/2021.