Saturday, October 29, 2005

50 years ago: “Autumn Leaves” hit #1

10/29/1955: “Autumn Leaves” hit #1

Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes)

Roger Williams

Writer(s): Joseph Kosma (music), Jacques Prévert (words – French), Johnny Mercer (words – English) (see lyrics here)


First Charted: August 1, 1955


Peak: 14 US, 13 HP, 13 CB, 13 HR (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 2.0 US


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 0.12 video, -- streaming

Autumn Leaves (Les Feuilles Mortes)

Cannonball Adderley


Recorded: March 9, 1958


Released: August 1958


First Charted: --


Peak: -- (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): -- US, -- UK, -- world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 6.4 video, -- streaming

Awards (Williams’ version): (Click on award for more details).

Awards (Adderley’s version): (Click on award for more details).

About the Song:

“Autumn Leaves” was originally written in 1945 as “Les Feuilles Mortes (The Dead Leaves)” by Hungarian composer Joseph Korma with French lyrics by Jacques Prévert. It was written as a choreographed duo for the ballet Le Rendez-Vous. It was introduced, without words, by Roland Petit in 1945 and copyrighted the next year. CJ

The next year Marcel Carné used it in his film Les Portes de la Nuite (Gates of the Night) It was sung briefly in the film by Yves Montand, CJ who also recorded the song in 1950, WK and again by Irène Joachim. CJ Cora Vaucaire was the first to sing the song in public and recorded it in 1947. CJ

Michael Golden from Capitol’s music publishing department loved the song and asked Johnny Mercer to write English lyrics for it. CJ The new version, titled “Autumn Leaves,” was recorded in July 1950 by Jo Stafford. WK Bing Crosby and Artie Shaw also recorded it that year. During the 1950s, it would also be covered by Nat “King” Cole and Frank Sinatra. WK Mercer later said he made more money from “Autumn Leaves” than any other song he wrote. CJ

The song had its first chart success in the United States in 1955 with versions by Steve Allen, the Ray Charles Singers, Jackie Gleason, Mitch Miller, and Victor Young all reaching the Billboard pop charts. HT However, the most successful version was the “majestic instrumental reading” AMG by pianist Roger Williams which went to #1 in 1955.

The song also became a favorite of jazz musicians. Cannonball Adderly and Miles Davis, Duke Ellington, Erroll Garner, and Stan Getz were among those to record the song in the 1950s. Jazz historian Philippe Baudoin called it “the most important non-American standard,” noting that it is “the eighth most-recorded tune by jazzmen,” CJ having been recorded around 1400 times. CJ


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First posted 4/22/2021.

Friday, October 21, 2005

Variety - 100 Icons of the Century

image from latimesblogs.latimes.com

Variety named its 100 icons of the century based on factors like their commercial and creative impact. The list consisted of people from all facets of the entertainment industry, but only those in the music arena are listed below (the top ten were ranked):

  • Louis Armstrong (ranked #2)
  • Fred Astaire
  • The Beatles (ranked #1)
  • Irving Berlin
  • Chuck Berry
  • Maria Callas
  • Johnny Cash
  • Ray Charles
  • Kurt Cobain
  • Bing Crosby
  • Miles Davis
  • Bob Dylan
  • Duke Ellington
  • Aretha Franklin
  • Judy Garland
  • Woody Guthrie
  • Oscar Hammerstein II
  • Jimi Hendrix
  • Billie Holiday
  • Michael Jackson
  • Robert Johnson
  • Al Jolson
  • Janis Joplin
  • Gene Kelly
  • Little Richard
  • Madonna
  • Bob Marley
  • Edith Piaf
  • Elvis Presley (ranked #10)
  • Richard Rodgers
  • Ginger Rogers
  • The Rolling Stones
  • The Sex Pistols
  • Tupac (2pac) Shakur
  • Frank Sinatra
  • Igor Stravinsky
  • Barbra Streisand
  • The Supremes
  • Hank Williams
  • Stevie Wonder

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Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Journey’s Generations released

First posted 10/10/2008; updated 9/12/2020.

Generations

Journey


Released: October 4, 2005


Peak: 170 US, -- UK, -- CN, -- AU


Sales (in millions): -- US, -- UK, 0.5 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks:

Song Title (date of single release, chart peaks) Click for codes to singles charts.

  1. Faith in the Heartland
  2. The Place in Your Heart (2005, --)
  3. A Better Life
  4. Every Generation
  5. Butterfly (She Flies Alone)
  6. Believe
  7. Knowing That You Love Me
  8. Out of Harms Way
  9. In Self Defense
  10. Better Together
  11. Gone Crazy
  12. Beyond the Clouds
  13. Never Too Late [remix version]


Total Running Time: 73:12


The Players:

  • Steve Augeri (vocals, guitar)
  • Neal Schon (guitar, backing vocals, lead vocals on “In Self-Defense”)
  • Jonathan Cain (keyboards, rhythm guitar, backing vocals, lead vocals on “Every Generation and “Pride of the Family”)
  • Ross Valory (bass, backing vocals, lead vocals on “Gone Crazy”)
  • Deen Castronovo (drums, backing vocals, lead vocals on “A Better Life” and “Never Too Late”)

Rating:

3.530 out of 5.00 (average of 11 ratings)

About the Album:

Generations was Journey’s second full studio album with lead singer Steve Augeri and drummer Deen Castronovo. This is the same line-up as the last two releases, 2001’s Arrival and 2002’s Red 13 EP.” JM “As Journey albums go, this isn’t anywhere near the genius that the dream team of Neal Schon, Jonathan Cain, [and former lead singer Steve] Perry brought forth in their heyday, but it certainly isn’t their worst work either,” AMG although from a chart standpoint, only the 1980 mostly-instrumental soundtrack Dream after Dream fared worst; it didn’t even chart. Of course, “the album was given away for free by the band during most of the concerts of the Generations tour in 2005, and subsequently released on Sanctuary Records later the same year.” JM

Steve Augeri is “finally coming into his own on the new material;” AMG he “has finally grown beyond being a soundalike for Perry and adds his own distinct flourishes to his delivery.” AMG Still, “there are moments you could swear the band is just playing one large practical joke and it really is Perry in the vocal booth.” AMG

“This time around, Augeri isn’t the only one doing vocal duty; it’s a whole band thing. Each member takes a turn singing a song, and the results are painfully mixed.” AMG “Jonathan Cain sings lead on Every Generation, the first time he sang lead since ‘All That Really Matters’ (a song originally left off Frontiers) from the Time 3 box set.” JM “Drummer Dean Castronovo is another convincing Perry soundalike” AMG on A Better Life and Never Too Late. However, “Schon and bassist Ross Valory come up short” AMG on In Self Defense and Gone Crazy, respectively. “Of course, singing isn’t Schon’s forte, as his signature blistering solos return and will testify to on many of these songs (including a nod in one solo to his memorable ending guitar solo on ‘Who’s Crying Now’).” AMG

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