Friday, February 26, 2021

Top 100 Adult Alternative Albums

First posted 2/26/2021.

Adult Alternative:

The Top 100 Albums, 1990-2021

In 1996, Billboard magazine launched its adult alternative chart, which was tracked radio stations focused on playing rock-oriented heritage artists such as Bruce Springsteen, Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, and John Mellencamp, as well as newer artists like Counting Crows, Dave Matthews Band, Hootie & the Blowfish, and Matchbox 20.

This list reflects albums which charted at least 3 songs on the adult alternative chart or, in the case of pre-1996 releases, albums which likely would have accomplished the feat based on those artists’ accomplishments on the post-1995 charts. More than 150 albums made the criteria. The top 100 have been ranked here, based on their overall status in Dave’s Music Database.

Check out other best-of-genre/category lists here.

1. R.E.M. Automatic for the People (1992)
2. Adele 21 (2011)
3. Alanis Morissette Jagged Little Pill (1995)
4. Pearl Jam Ten (1991)
5. U2 Achtung Baby (1991)
6. Oasis (What’s the Story) Morning Glory (1995)
7. Coldplay A Rush of Blood to the Head (2002)
8. Red Hot Chili Peppers Blood Sugar Sex Magik (1991)
9. Green Day Dookie (1994)
10. Adele 25 (2015)

11. Oasis Definitely Maybe (1994)
12. R.E.M. Out of Time (1991)
13. Santana Supernatural (1999)
14. Smashing Pumpkins Siamese Dream (1993)
15. Smashing Pumpkins Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (1995)
16. U2 All That You Can’t Leave Behind (2000)
17. Coldplay X & Y (2005)
18. Coldplay Viva La Vida or Death and All His Friends (2008)
19. Hootie & the Blowfish Cracked Rear View (1994)
20. Bruce Springsteen The Rising (2002)

21. Live Throwing Copper (1994)
22. Sheryl Crow Tuesday Night Music Club (1993)
23. U2 How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb (2004)
24. Counting Crows August and Everything After (1993)
25. Kings of Leon Only by the Night (2008)
26. Keane Hopes and Fears (2004)
27. Red Hot Chili Peppers Californication (1999)
28. Mumford & Sons Babel (2012)
29. Red Hot Chili Peppers Stadium Arcadium (2006)
30. Matchbox 20 Yourself or Someone Like You (1996)

31. David Gray White Ladder (2000)
32. Jack Johnson In Between Dreams (2005)
33. U2 No Line on the Horizon (2009)
34. Mumford & Sons Sigh No More (2009)
35. U2 Songs of Innocence (2014)
36. Jewel Pieces of You (1995)
37. Imagine Dragons Night Visions (2012)
38. U2 Zooropa (1993)
39. Sarah McLachlan Surfacing (1997)
40. Lorde Pure Heroine (2013)

41. Sarah McLachlan Fumbling Towards Ecstasy (1993)
42. Jack Johnson Sleep Through the Static (2008)
43. Vampire Weekend Father of the Bride (2019)
44. Sting Ten Summoner’s Tales (1993)
45. Dave Matthews Band Under the Table and Dreaming (1994)
46. R.E.M. Monster (1994)
47. Florence + the Machine Ceremonials (2011)
48. R.E.M. New Adventures in Hi-Fi (1996)
49. Snow Patrol Eyes Open (2006)
50. John Mayer Continuum (2006)

51. Dave Matthews Band Crash (1996)
52. Alabama Shakes Sound & Color (2015)
53. Sting Brand New Day (1999)
54. Sheryl Crow Sheryl Crow (1996)
55. Coldplay Mylo Xyloto (2011)
56. The Wallflowers Bringing Down the Horse (1996)
57. U2 Pop (1997)
58. Bonnie Raitt Luck of the Draw (1991)
59. Melissa Etheridge Yes I Am (1993)
60. The Black Keys El Camino (2011)

61. Beck Colors (2017)
62. Sherly Crow The Globe Sessions (1998)
63. Sting The Soul Cages (1991)
64. Florence + the Machine How Big, How Blue, How Beautiful (2015)
65. Kings of Leon Come Around Sundown (2010)
66. Steely Dan Two Against Nature (2000)
67. KT Tunstall Eye to the Telescope (2004)
68. John Mayer Room for Squares (2001)
69. U2 Songs of Experience (2017)
70. The Black Keys Turn Blue (2014)

71. fun. Some Nights (2012)
72. Shery Crow Detours (2008)
73. Tame Impala The Slow Rush (2020)
74. Bonnie Raitt Longing in Their Hearts (1994)
75. Third Eye Blind Third Eye Blind (1997)
76. The Decemberists The King Is Dead (2011)
77. Matchbox 20 Mad Season (2000)
78. Feist The Reminder (2007)
79. Dave Matthews Band Big Whiskey and the Groogrux King (2009)
80. The Raconteurs Help Us Stranger (2019)

81. Cage the Elephant Social Cues (2019)
82. Jack Johnson To the Sea (2010)
83. Dave Matthews Band Before These Crowded Streets (1998)
84. Goo Goo Dolls Dizzy Up the Girl (1998)
85. The Lumineers The Lumineers (2012)
86. Gin Blossoms New Miserable Experience (1992)
87. Alabama Shakes Boys & Girls (2012)
88. Shawn Colvin A Few Small Repairs (1996)
89. Train Drops of Jupiter (2001)
90. Hozier Hozier (2014)

91. Death Cab for Cutie Plans (2005)
92. Fiona Apple Tidal (1996)
93. Paula Cole This Fire (1996)
94. John Mayer Heavier Things (2003)
95. Toad the Wet Sprocket Fear (1991)
96. One Republic Native (2013)
97. Of Monsters and Men My Head Is an Animal (2011)
98. The Fray How to Save a Life (2005)
99. Joan Osborne Relish (1995)
100. Dave Matthews Band Everyday (2001)


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Thursday, February 25, 2021

USA: #1 Pop Songs, 1890-2021

First posted 2/24/2021; updated 2/25/2021.

USA’s #1 Pop Songs:

1890-2021

These are the #1 pop songs in the history of the United States pop charts from 1890 to present. Songs could have hit #1 on any of the following charts:

  • the pre-Hot 100 pop charts, 1890-1955 (BB)
  • Billboard Hot 100 chart, 1955-present (BB)
  • Billboard Best Sellers chart, 1940-1958 (BS)
  • Billboard Disc Jockey Hits, 1944-1958 (DJ)
  • Billboard Juke Box Hits, 1940-1957 (JB)
  • Billboard pop airplay chart, 1984-present (BA)
  • Billboard digital chart, 2005-present (DG)
  • Billboard streaming chart, 2013-present (ST)
  • Hit Parade, 1935-1955 (HP)
  • Cashbox, 1950-1996 (CB)
  • Hit Records, 1954-1982 (HR)
  • Radio & Records/Mediabase, 1973-present (RR)

Because this list includes more than 3000 songs, it has been broken up into pages by decades:

Resources/Related Links:

Wednesday, February 24, 2021

USA: #1 Pop Songs, 1890-1899

First posted 2/24/2021.

USA’s #1 Pop Songs:

1890-1899

These are the #1 pop songs in the history of the United States pop charts from 1890 to 1899. These songs topped the pre-Hot 100 pop charts, which ran from 1890-1955. Click here to access a full list of #1 songs from 1890 to present.


1890:

  1. 8/2: U.S. Marine Band “Semper Fidelis” (2 weeks)
  2. 9/13: U.S. Marine Band “The Washington Post March” (6)
  3. 10/25: U.S. Marine Band “The Thunderer” (4)

1891:

  1. 3/7: Len Spencer “Little ‘Liza Loves You” (4)
  2. 4/4: George Washington Johnson “The Laughing Song” (10)
  3. 6/13: Russell Hunting “Michael Casey As a Physician” (4)
  4. 7;11: George Washington Johnson “The Whistling Coon” (5)
  5. 8/22: John Yorke Atlee “Listen to the Mocking Bird (aka ‘The Mocking Bird’)” (6)
  6. 9/19: Dan Kelly “Pat Kelly As a Police Justice” (4)
  7. 10/17: Billy Golden “Turkey in the Straw” (7)
  8. 12/5: George J. Gaskin “Drill, Ye Terriers, Drill” (5)


1892:

  1. 1/9: George J. Gaskin “Slide Kelly Slide” (3)
  2. 1/30: Len Spencer “Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay” (8)
  3. 3/26: Manhansett Quartette “The Picture Turned to the Wall” (6)
  4. 5/7: Manhansett Quartette “Sally in Our Alley” (3)
  5. 5/28: Joe Natus “The Song That Reached My Heart” (3)
  6. 6/18: Charles Marsh “Throw Him Down, McCloskey” (3)
  7. 7/9: Russell Hunting “Michael Casey at the Telephone” (5)
  8. 8/13: Len Spencer “The Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)” (6)
  9. 9/24: Will Denny “The Pretty Red Rose” (2)
  10. 10/8: Russell Hunting “Michael Casey Taking the Census” (6)
  11. 11/19: Len Spencer “Near It” (2)
  12. 12/3: Thomas Bott “Love’s Old Sweet Song” (4)
  13. 12/31: Dan Quinn “Daddy Wouldn’t Buy Me a Bow Wow” (4)

1893:

  1. 1/28: Dan Quinn “The Bowery” (5)
  2. 3/4: George J. Gaskin “Oh Promise Me” (8)
  3. 4/29: George J. Gaskin “After the Ball” (10)
  4. 7/8: Jules Levy “My Country ‘Tis of Thee” (3)
  5. 7/29: Len Spencer “Mamie Come and Kiss Your Honey Boy” (3)
  6. 8/19: J.W. Myers “Two Little Girls in Blue” (4)
  7. 9/16: Dan Quinn “Daisy Bell (A Bicycle Built for Two)” (9)
  8. 11/18: George J. Gaskin “The Fatal Wedding” (8)


1894:

  1. 1/13: Russell Hunting “Casey As Insurance Agent” (3)
  2. 2/3: George J. Gaskin “Sweet Marie” (5)
  3. 3/10: U.S. Marine Band “The Liberty Bell” (5)
  4. 4/14: Edward M. Favor “Say Au Revoir, But Not Goodbye” (7)
  5. 6/2: Vess Ossman “Yankee Doodle” (4)
  6. 6/30: Silas Leachman “Dem Golden Slippers” (4)
  7. 7/28: George J. Gaskin “We Were Sweethearts, Nell and I” (3)
  8. 8/18: Dan Quinn “Lindley, Does You Love Me?” (3)
  9. 10/6: Dan Quinn “My Pearl Is a Bowery Girl” (4)
  10. 11/3: Russell Hunting “Casey at Denny Murphy’s Wake” (3)
  11. 11/24: Dan Quinn “And Her Golden Hair Was Hanging Down Her Back” (6)

1895:

  1. 1/5: Len Spencer “Little Alabama Coon” (5)
  2. 2/9: Dan Quinn “The Sidewalks of New York” (9)
  3. 3/21: Edward M. Favor “My Best Girl’s a New Yorker” (5)
  4. 4/13: J.W. Myers “The Sidewalks of New York” (4)
  5. 4/25: Len Spencer “The Bully (aka ‘Dat New Bully’)” (5)
  6. 5/30: Vess Ossman “Cocoanut Dance” (3)
  7. 6/15: Sousa’s Band “El Capitan March” (7)
  8. 8/1: J.W. Myers “Just Tell Them That You Saw Me” (6)
  9. 8/3: Sousa’s Band “The Washington Post March” (3)
  10. 8/24: Dan Quinn “The Band Played On” (10)
  11. 11/2: Dan Quinn “Little Lost Child” (5)


1896:

  1. 1/4: George J. Gaskin “The Sunshine of Paradise Alley” (6)
  2. 2/15: George J. Gaskin “She May Have Seen Better Days” (5)
  3. 6/20: Len Spencer with Vess Ossman “A Hot Time on the Levee” (3)
  4. 9/12: George J. Gaskin “Down in Poverty Roy” (4)
  5. 10/10: George J. Gaskin “On the Benches in the Park” (4)
  6. 11/7: Dan Quinn “In the Baggage Coach Ahead” (5)
  7. 12/12: Dan Quinn “A Hot Time in the Old Town” (7)

1897:

  1. 1/30: Len Spencer “A Hot Time in the Old Town” (3)
  2. 2/20: Len Spencer “Oh, Mr. Johnson, Turn Me Loose” (4)
  3. 3/20: Len Spencer “My Gal Is a Highborn Lady” (4)
  4. 4/17: Dan Quinn “My Mother Was a Lady” (5)
  5. 5/22: George J. Gaskin “Sweet Rosie O’Grady” (8)
  6. 7/17: Sousa’s Band “The Stars and Stripes Forever” (8)
  7. 9/11: Dan Quinn “There’s a Little Star Shining for You” (4)
  8. 11/6: George J. Gaskin “On the Banks of the Wabash” (10)


1898:

  1. 1/15: Steve Porter “On the Banks of the Wabash” (4)
  2. 2/12: Edison Male Quartette “My Old Kentucky Home” (3)
  3. 4/2: George J. Gaskin “Break the News to Mother” (7)
  4. 5/21: Cal Stewart “Uncle Josh’s Arriva in New York” (5)
  5. 6/25: Len Spencer “I Don’t Like No Cheap Man” (3)
  6. 7/16: George J. Gaskin “She Was Bred in Old Kentucky” (6)
  7. 8/27: Steve Porter “She’s More to Be Pitied Than Censured” (4)
  8. 9/24: Cal Stewart “I’m Old But I’m Awfully Tough (Laughing Song)” (3)
  9. 10/15: Dan Quinn “She Was Happy Till She Met You” (4)
  10. 11/12: Dan Quinn “At a Georgia Camp Meeting” (4)
  11. 12/10: George J. Gaskin “My Old New Hampshire Home” (10)

1899:

  1. 2/18: Arthur Collins “Kiss Me, Honey, Do” (4)
  2. 3/18: Arthur Collins “When you Ain’t Go No More Money, Well, You Needn’t Come Around” (2)
  3. 4/1: Arthur Collins “I Guess I’ll Have to Telegraph My Baby” (4)
  4. 4/29: Arthur Collins “Hello, Ma Baby” (4)
  5. 5/27: Len Spencer “Hello! Ma Baby” (6)
  6. 7/8: George J. Gaskin “My Wild Irish Rose” (3)
  7. 7/29: George J. Gaskin “My Wild Irish Rose” (6)
  8. 9/9: William F. Hooley “Gypsy Love Song” (5)
  9. 10/14: Steve Porter “A Picture No Artist Can Paint” (2)
  10. 10/28: Dan Quinn “Curse of the Dreamer” (7)
  11. 12/16: Arthur Collins “I’d Leave My Happy Home for You” (7)


Resources/Related Links:

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Dennis DeYoung: Artist Profile

Dennis DeYoung:

Artist Profile


Born: February 18, 1947
Where: Chicago, Illinois


Known As: rock singer/songwriter and keyboardist


Significant Bands:
  • Styx (1971-1984, 1990-99)

Awards:

The Albums:

Hover over an album for the name and year of release. Click to see its DMDB page.


Compilations:


Live Albums:


Key Tracks:
  • Lady (Styx, 1972)
  • Light Up (Styx, 1975)
  • Lorelei (Styx, 1975)
  • Suite Madame Blue (Styx, 1975)
  • Come Sail Away (Styx, 1977)
  • Babe (Styx, 1979)
  • The Best of Times (Styx, 1981)
  • Rockin’ the Paradise (Styx, 1981)
  • Mr. Roboto (Styx, 1983)
  • Don’t Let It End (Styx, 1983)
  • Desert Moon (1984)
  • Don’t Wait for Heroes (1984)
  • Call Me (1986)
  • This Is the Time (1986)
  • Harry’s Hands (1989)
  • Show Me the Way (Styx, 1990)
  • Love at First Sight (Styx, 1990)
  • Paradise (Styx, 1997)
  • While There’s Still Time (Styx, 1999)
  • With Every Heartbeat (2003)
  • One Hundred Years from Now (2007)
  • To the Good Old Days (with Julian Lennon, 2020)
  • Isle of Misanthrope (2021)

Click here to see the top 100 songs of Styx et al.

Early Years (1963-1972):
“Growing up in the Roseland neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois, DeYoung’s career as a vocalist started in 1963 at the age of 16 when he teamed up with his 15 year old neighbors, Chuck and John Panozzo, in a three-piece combo. The trio later added guitarist James Young and John Curulewski to form the band Tradewinds in the late 1960s. The band renamed itself TW4 in 1968 before becoming Styx in 1970.” WK

“Before the band met with success, DeYoung spent time as an elementary school teacher in the southern suburbs of Chicago, where he taught music at Springfield School in Midlothian, Illinois. During this period, the band played a number of small venues and school auditoriums refining their craft.” WK

The Wooden Nickel Years (1972-1974):
Styx released four studio albums with the Wooden Nickel. They got their big break when Lady was picked up by a radio station in 1974, more than a year after its parent album, Styx II, was released. The song became a top-ten hit and launched the band. DeYoung, a self-taught keyboardist, served as the lead vocalist and songwriter and creative force behind the band.

The Rise of Styx (1975-1977):
Styx was signed to the major label A&M. They released Equinox in 1975, Crystal Ball in 1976, and The Grand Illusion in 1977. The latter album was a top-10, multi-platinum seller, fueled by another DeYoung-helmed top-ten hit Come Sail Away.

The Giants of Rock and Roll (1977-1983):
The Grand Illusion was Styx’s first of four consecutive top-10, multi-platinum albums – a feat never accomplished before. They led the way in what has been called arena rock or corporate rock. The band landed its first #1 hit in 1979 with Babe, another song written and sung by DeYoung.

Their 1981 Paradise Theater became the band’s first #1 album. Once again, it was DeYoung out front for the #3 hit The Best of Times from that album. On the follow-up, Kilroy Was Here, DeYoung gave the band two more top-10 hits with Mr. Roboto and Don’t Let It End.

The Solo Years (1984-1989):
“With Styx in limbo following [bandmate Tommy] Shaw’s 1984 departure, DeYoung began a solo career of modest success. His first solo album, Desert Moon, generated a top 10 hit, Desert Moon, and the follow-up single, Don’t Wait for Heroes, cracked the Billboard Top 40 as well.” WK

DeYoung made two more solo albums in the ‘80s featuring gems such as Call Me, This Is the Time, and Harry’s Hands, but none of his songs or albums would be as successful as his first solo album, much less his work with Styx.

Styx Reunites (1990-1992):
“In 1990, Styx (minus Tommy Shaw, who was replaced by guitarist/singer-songwriter Glen Burtnik) returned to the studio for the album Edge of the Century. Show Me the Way, a track written by DeYoung for his son Matthew, received extensive radio play, peaking at #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart…particularly after a number of radio stations mixed it with voice tracks of parents headed off to fight in the first Persian Gulf War. This success made the band one of only a handful of bands/artists to have a top ten single under four different Presidents in the United States. The group toured North America extensively before A&M Records…dropped the group from its roster in 1992; the group broke up again shortly afterwards.” WK

DDY on the Theater Stage (1992-1995):
“In 1993, DeYoung, a devout Roman Catholic, joined a touring revival of the stage musical Jesus Christ Superstar. He appeared in about 200 performances across North America as Pontius Pilate. The experience inspired him to record his 1994 album of Broadway standards, 10 on Broadway, and to begin work on a musical of his own based on The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Styx, Together Again (1995-1999):
“Styx reunited once more in 1995, this time including Shaw but minus a terminally ill John Panozzo (who died a short time later in July 1996), and recorded a new version of the DeYoung-penned ‘Lady’ for their 1995 Styx Greatest Hits album. The group toured in 1996 and 1997, and returned to the recording studio in 1998 to begin work on Brave New World, their first studio album in nearly a decade.” WK

“Creative differences between the band members, and a chronic fatigue syndrome-like disorder affecting DeYoung’s trigeminal nerve – which left him overly sensitive to bright light and sound, making performing on stage nearly impossible” WK – led to a less than amicable split. This time, however, Styx soldiered on with Shaw and without DeYoung.

“A lawsuit between DeYoung and his former bandmates was settled in 2001, with the group being allowed to keep the name ‘Styx’ and DeYoung able to use the name in descriptive phrases such as ‘the music of Styx’ or ‘formerly of Styx’ (but not ‘the voice of Styx’).” WK

Back to the Solo World (2000-:
“In February 2000, DeYoung was approached to perform a concert featuring his many songs from Styx, as well as his solo works and his 1997 stage musical The Hunchback of Notre Dame, with an orchestra. The show, performed at the Rosemont Theatre in DeYoung’s hometown of Chicago, was a family affair for DeYoung. His wife Suzanne,” WK to whom he had been married since even before Styx’s success, “and sister-in-law Dawn Marie Feusi sang backup, his daughter Carrie Ann, was in charge of publicity, while his son Matthew designed the stage lighting. The concert was well received and formed the basis for a touring version of the show, and eventually an 2004 album, The Music of Styx – Live with Symphony Orchestra.” WK “Unlike many musical families, the growing family toured together throughout DeYoung’s career in order to provide stability for the couple’s young children.” WK

“On June 19, 2007, DeYoung released in Canada, One Hundred Years from Now, his fifth solo album, which marks a return to his rock roots. The first single, the title track, is a duet with Québécois singer Éric Lapointe. The single reached #1 on the Québec Radio Single and Soundscan charts. The album was released in the U.S. on April 14, 2009 with slightly different tracks.” WK

“On May 8, 2008, a DeYoung-written musical of The Hunchback of Notre Dame premiered at the Bailiwick Repertory Theatre in Chicago.” WK

After a 13-year hiatus from the recording studio, Dennis returned with the solo album 26 East Volume 1 in 2020. It was followed by 26 East Volume 2 in 2021. He says it is the last album he’ll make.


Resources and Related Links:

First posted 11/20/2011; updated 6/5/2021.