Sunday, September 29, 2019

The Top 100 Country Songs of All Time

/2019. Originally posted 8/3/2011; updated 9/30/2019.

First posted on Facebook on April 3, 2011 and then on the blog on August 28, 2011.

The DMDB’s list of the top 100 country songs of all time was created by aggregating more than 60 best-of lists focused on country songs. See the resources at the bottom of this page.

  1. Crazy” Patsy Cline (1961)
  2. “He Stopped Loving Her Today” George Jones (1980)
  3. “Stand by Your Man” Tammy Wynette (1968)
  4. Friends in Low Places” Garth Brooks (1990)
  5. “El Paso” Marty Robbins (1959)
  6. I Walk the Line” Johnny Cash (1956)
  7. “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” Charlie Daniels Band (1979)
  8. “Your Cheatin’ Heart” Hank Williams (1953)
  9. Always on My Mind” Willie Nelson (1982)
  10. “Ring of Fire” Johnny Cash (1963)

  11. “King of the Road” Roger Miller (1965)
  12. “Forever and Ever, Amen” Randy Travis (1987)
  13. “I Hope You Dance” Lee Ann Womack (2000)
  14. “Sixteen Tons” Tennessee Ernie Ford (1955)
  15. “I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry” Hank Williams (1949)
  16. “Coal Miner’s Daughter” Loretta Lynn (1970)
  17. “Mama Tried” Merle Haggard (1968)
  18. “I Fall to Pieces” Patsy Cline (1961)
  19. “The Gambler” Kenny Rogers (1978)
  20. “Hello Darlin’” Conway Twitty (1970)

  21. I Will Always Love You” Dolly Parton (1974)
  22. “Folsom Prison Blues” Johnny Cash (1956)
  23. “Jolene” Dolly Parton (1973)
  24. “The Dance” Garth Brooks (1990)
  25. “Live Like You Were Dying” Tim McGraw (2004)
  26. “Help Me Make It Through the Night” Sammi Smith (1971)
  27. “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky-Tonk Angels” Kitty Wells (1952)
  28. Before He Cheats” Carrie Underwood (2006)
  29. “Amazed” Lonestar (1999)
  30. “Rhinestone Cowboy” Glen Campbell (1975)

  31. “Behind Closed Doors” Charlie Rich (1973)
  32. “Harper Valley P.T.A.” Jeannie C. Riley (1968)
  33. “He’ll Have to Go” Jim Reeves (1959)
  34. “Where Were You When the World Stopped Turning” Alan Jackson (2001)
  35. Need You Now” Lady Antebellum (2009)
  36. “Mammas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys” Waylon Jennings & Willie Nelson (1978)
  37. “Okie from Muskogee” Merle Haggard (1969)
  38. “Walking the Floor Over You” Ernest Tubb (1941)
  39. “For the Good Times” Ray Price (1970)
  40. “Lovesick Blues” Hank Williams (1949)

  41. “Hey, Good Lookin’” Hank Williams (1951)
  42. “Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain” Willie Nelson (1975)
  43. “Breathe” Faith Hill (1999)
  44. “Can the Circle Be Unbroken (Bye and Bye)” The Carter Family (1935)
  45. “Hello Walls” Faron Young (1961)
  46. “Luckenbach, Texas (Back to the Basics of Love)” Waylon Jennings (1977)
  47. “Amarillo by Morning” George Strait (1983)
  48. Wabash Cannonball” Roy Acuff & the Smoky Mountain Boys (1938)
  49. “Make the World Go Away” Eddy Arnold (1965)
  50. “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin’” Charley Pride (1971)

  51. “Act Naturally” Buck Owens (1963)
  52. “Crazy Arms” Ray Price (1956)
  53. “Coat of Many Colors” Dolly Parton (1971)
  54. “The Battle of New Orleans” Johnny Horton (1959)
  55. I Can’t Stop Loving You” Ray Charles (1962)
  56. “Good Hearted Woman” Waylon Jennings with Willie Nelson (1975)
  57. “God Bless the U.S.A.” Lee Greenwood (1984)
  58. “Tumbling Tumbleweeds” Sons of the Pioneers (1934)
  59. “Smokey Mountain Rain” Ronnie Milsap (1980)
  60. “Wildwood Flower” The Carter Family (1928)

  61. “I Never Promised You a Rose Garden” Lynn Anderson (1970)
  62. “Sweet Dreams of You” Patsy Cline (1963)
  63. “Elvira” The Oak Ridge Boys (1981)
  64. “Cruise” Florida Georgia Line (2012)
  65. “Blue Moon of Kentucky” Bill Monroe (1947)
  66. “Take Me Home Country Roads” John Denver (1971)
  67. “You’re Still the One” Shania Twain (1998)
  68. “I’m Moving On” Hank Snow (1950)
  69. Tennessee Waltz” Patti Page (1950)
  70. “Oh Lonesome Me” Don Gibson (1958)

  71. “Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue...Crystal Gayle (1977)
  72. “Blue” LeAnn iRimes (1996)
  73. “Fancy” Reba McEntire (1991)
  74. “Islands in the Stream” Kenny Rogers with Dolly Parton (1983)
  75. “Hurt” Johnny Cash (2002)
  76. “Wichita Lineman” Glen Campbell (1968)
  77. “Wide Open Spaces” Dixie Chicks (1998)
  78. “Faded Love” Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys (1950)
  79. “Stay” Sugarland (2007)
  80. “You Are My Sunshine” Jimmie Davis (1940)

  81. “Take This Job and Shove It” Johnny Paycheck (1977)
  82. “Before the Next Teardrop Falls” Freddy Fender (1975)
  83. “There Goes My Everything” Jack Greene (1966)
  84. “Flowers on the Wall” The Statler Brothers (1965)
  85. “Long Black Veil” Lefty Frizzell (1959)
  86. “Don’t Rock the Jukebox” Alan Jackson (1991)
  87. Love Story” Taylor Swift (2008)
  88. “Jambalaya on the Bayou” Hank Williams (1952)
  89. “San Antonio Rose” Bob Wills & His Texas Playboys (1939)
  90. Blue Yodel #1 (T for Texas)” Jimmie Rodgers (1928)

  91. “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs (1950)
  92. “Achy Breaky Heart” Billy Ray Cyrus (1992)
  93. “Walkin’ After Midnight” Patsy Cline (1957)
  94. “I’ve Got a Tiger by the Tail” Buck Owens (1965)
  95. “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” Brooks & Dunn (1991)
  96. “On the Road Again” Willie Nelson (1980)
  97. “Cold, Cold Heart” Hank Williams (1931)
  98. “Rocky Top” Osborne Brothers (1968)
  99. “Chattahoochee” Alan Jackson (1992)
  100. “Strawberry Wine” Deanna Carter (1996)


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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Dave's Music Database Hall of Fame: Act Inductees (September 2019)

Originally posted 9/22/2019.

January 22, 2019 marked the 10-year anniversary of the DMDB blog! To honor that, Dave’s Music Database announced its own Hall of Fame. This month marks the third batch of act inductees. These are the top ten female artists according to the DMDB. Note: click on the name of the act to see the full DMDB Music Maker Encyclopedia entry.

Mariah Carey (1970-)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

Referred to as the “Songbird Supreme” by the Guinness World Records, the 1990 Best New Artist Grammy winner is known for her five-octave vocal range. The Long Island native is the only artist to have her first five singles top the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart and is second only to the Beatles with 19 total chart-toppers. Her songs “One Sweet Day” (1995) and “We Belong Together” (2005) rank in the top 10 biggest #1 songs in the history of the Billboard charts.

Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

The most honored jazz singer of all time. Discovered after winning the Harlem Amateur Hour in 1934, she was hired by Chick Webb and in 1938 created a popular sensation with “A-Tisket, A-Tasket.” Following Chick’s death in 1939, Ella took over the band for three years. Winner of the Down Beat poll as top female vocalist more than 20 times, she remains among the undisputed royalty of 20th century popular music.

Aretha Franklin (1942-2018)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

R&B singer known as “The Queen of Soul.” Her father was a Baptist preacher and Aretha got her start in the church choir, first recording as a gospel artist from 1956-60. Signed with Columbia Records in 1960 and recorded secular music. Went to Atlantic Records in 1966 and Arista Records in 1980.

Billie Holiday (1915-1959)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

Blues singer known as the great “Lady Day.” Rivaled only by Ella Fitzgerald among all female jazz singers. Following her difficult early years she was discovered in 1933 by jazz critic John Hammond. She recorded one hit with Benny Goodman, then began her classic 1935-38 association with Teddy Wilson, accompanied by the top jazz musicians in the country. Billie also sang briefly in the late ‘30s with Count Basie and Artie Shaw. The 1972 movie Lady Sings the Blues was based on her life.

Whitney Houston (1963-2012)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

R&B/pop singer. Daughter of Cissy Houston and cousin of Dionne Warwick. Began singing career at age 11 with the gospel group New Hope Baptist Junior Choir. As a teen, worked as a backing vocalist for Chaka Khan and Lou Rawls. Pursued modeling career in 1981, appeaing in Glamour magazine and on the cover of Seventeen. Married singer Bobby Brown on 7/18/92. Starred in the movies The Bodyguard, Waiting to Exhale, and The Preacher’s Wife.

Ada Jones (1873-1922)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

She was born in the UK, but her family movied to Philadelphia when she was 6. She was one of the earliest female singers to be recorded. She made her first recordings in 1893 on wax cylinders for Edison Records. She frequently sang with Billy Murray.

Madonna (1958-)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

The best-selling female recording artist of all time. Dance-pop singer and record executive (Maverick Records) known as the “Queen of Pop.” She was known for her boundary-pushing videos, costumes, and overall image. She was also featured in movies, includingEvita (1996) which won her a Golden Globe Award for Best Actress.

Dolly Parton (1946-)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

Country singer/songwriter. She has charted more than 100 times on the country chart, making her the top female country artist of all time. One of the few people to receive Oscar, Grammy Tony, and Emmy nominations. She worked with Porter Wagoner as a duo from 1967-76 while also recording solo. Joined the Grand Ole Opry in 1969. She also starred in movies 9 to 5, Steel Magnolias, and more.

Diana Ross (1944-)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

She was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, where she became the lead singer of The Supremes, the best-charting female group in U.S. history and Motown’s most successful act. She left the group in 1970, but continued to have success as a solo artist. She also won a Golden Globe for her performance in Lady Sings the Blues (1972). In 1993, the Guinness Book of World Records declared her the most successful female music artist in history.

Tina Turner (1939-)

Inducted September 2019 as a “Top 10 Female Act.”

R&B/rock singer who found success as half of a duo with Ike Turner, to whom she was married from 1958-76. After a few overlooked solo efforts in the ‘70s, Tina returned with the album Private Dancer in 1984 and launched one of rock’s greatest comeback stories. The 12-time Grammy winner has been called “The Queen of Rock ‘n’ Roll” and sold more than 200 million records worldwide.
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Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Oasis: Top 20 Songs

First posted 9/10/2019.

Alternative rock group from Manchester, England at the helm of the Britpop movement. Active: 1991-2009 Members: Brothers Liam (v) and Noel Gallagher (g/lyrics) with Gem Archer (k/g: 99-09), Paul “Bonehead” Arthurs (g: 91-99), Andy Bell (b/k/g: 99-09), Tony McCarroll (d: 91-95), Paul McGuigan (b: 91-99), Alan White (d: 95-04).

For a complete list of this act’s DMDB honors, check out the DMDB Music Maker Encyclopedia entry.


Top 20 Songs

Dave’s Music Database lists are determined by song’s appearances on best-of lists as well as chart success, sales, radio airplay, streaming, and awards.

May include notations about songs which hit #1, are in the DMDB top 1000, songs which have more successful versions in the DMDB, and notes about songs recorded by the act under other names.

DMDB Top 1%:

1. Wonderwall (1995) #1 MR, #1 AU
2. Live Forever (1994)

DMDB Top 5%:

3. Don’t Look Back in Anger (1996) #1 UK
4. Champagne Supernova (1996) #1 MR

DMDB Top 20%:

5. Supersonic (1994)
6. Whatever (1994)
7. D’You Know What I Mean (1997) #1 UK
8. Cigarettes and Alcohol (1994)

Outside the DMDB Top 20%:

9. Lyla (2005) #1 UK
10. All Around the World (1998) #1 UK
11. Go Let It Out (2000) #1 UK, #1 CN
12. Don’t Go Away (1997)
13. Some Might Say (1995) #1 UK
14. Morning Glory (1995)
15. The Shock of the Lightning (2008)
16. Roll with It (1995)
17. Acquiese (1995)
18. The Hindu Times (2002) #1 UK
19. Little by Little (2002)
20. Stop Crying Your Heart Out (2002)


Awards:


Sunday, September 8, 2019

One-Hit Wonders

First posted 9/8/2019.

I am consistently annoyed by lists of supposed one-hit wonders. Inevitably, there are acts that are definitely NOT one-hit wonders. Some of the most glaring examples I’ve seen in different articles are Survivor (“Eye of the Tiger” #1, “Burning Heart” #2, top ten hits with “The Search Is Over,” “High on You,” and “Is This Love”), Toto (“Africa” #1, “Rosanna” #2, top tens with “Hold the Line” and “I Won’t Hold You Back”), and Sugarloaf (top ten hits with “Green-Eyed Lady” and “Don’t Call Us, We’ll Call You”). There are also a couple of acts who certainly are best known for certain songs, but did have other hits. Aha (“Take on Me” #1, “The Sun Always Shines on TV” top 20) and The Knack (“My Sharona” #1, “Good Girls Don’t” #11) are the first two that come to mind.

It begs the question – how does one even definte a “hit”? For the purposes of this post, the focus is exclusively on the U.S. Billboard pop charts from 1890 to present. One could argue that a true one-hit wonder has only graced the Hot 100 once. However, this post will focus on acts which have only hit the top 40 once since songs lower than that arguably didn’t achieve familiarity with a general audience.

This leaves more than 2400 eligible songs with some definite surprises. Jimi Hendrix, Carl Perkins, Lou Reed (all on this list), and Dr. John (“Right Place Wrong Time”), Grateful Dead (“Touch of Grey”), Public Enemy (“Give It Up”), Roxy Music (“Love Is the Drug”), Rush (“New World Man”), The Small Faces (“Itchycoo Park”), and Frank Zappa (“Valley Girl”) only had one top 40 hit each despite the legendary status which got them inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Other acts like Beck; Oasis; and T-Rex (all on this list); along with Garth Brooks (“Lost in You”); Kate Bush “Running Up That Hill”); Emerson, Lake & Palmer (“From the Beginning”); Lefty Frizzell (“I Want to Be with You Always”); Merle Haggard (“If We Make It Through December”); Iggy Pop (“Candy”); Method Man (“I'll Be There for You / You're All I Need to Get By”); Shinedown (“Second Chance”); Weezer (“Beverly Hills”); The White Stripes (“Icky Thump”); and Warren Zevon (“Werewolves of London”) have plenty of success, but multiple chart hits on the top 40 eluded them.

If a song is marked with an asterisk (*), that indicates that the song is the only top 40 hit for the lead act, but that the supporting act has other top 40 hits. With all that established, here are the results for the biggest one-hit wonders of the Hot 100 chart era:


1. Sinéad O’Connor “Nothing Compares 2 U” (#1, 1990)
2. Mark Ronson “Uptown Funk!” (with Bruno Mars, #1, 2014) *
3. Luis Fonsi “Despacito” (with Daddy Yankee & Justin Bieber, 2017, #1) *
4. Gotye with Kimbra "Somebody That I Used to Know" (#1, 2011)
5. Gnarls Barkley “Crazy” (#2, 2006)
6. USA for Africa “We Are the World” (#1, 1985)
7. The Jimi Hendrix Experience “All Along the Watchtower” (#20, 1968)
8. Coleman Hawkins “Body and Soul” (#13, 1940)
9. Debby Boone “You Light Up My Life” (#1, 1977)
10. The Penguins “Earth Angel (Will You Be Mine)” (#8, 1954)

11. Daft Punk with Pharrell Williams “Get Lucky” (#2, 2013)
12. Oasis “Wonderwall” (#8, 1995)
13. The Verve “Bittersweet Symphony” (#12, 1997)
14. Carl Perkins “Blue Suede Shoes” (#2, 1956)
15. Soft Cell “Tainted Love” (#8, 1981)
16. Knickerbocker Quartet “Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag and Smile, Smile, Smile” (#1, 1917)
17. James Blunt “You’re Beautiful” (#1, 2004)
18. Frankie Lymon & the Teenagers “Why Do Fools Fall in Love?” (#6, 1956)
19. Don Azpiazu & Arturo Machin “The Peanut Vendor (El Manicero” (#1, 1930)
20. Cee-Lo Green “Fuck You (aka “Forget You”)” (#2, 2010)

21. Daniel Powter “Bad Day” (#1, 2005)
22. Buffalo Springfield “For What It’s Worth” (#7, 1966)
23. Passenger “Let Her Go” (#5, 2012)
24. Amy Winehouse “Rehab” (#9, 2006)
25. Domenico Modugno “Volare (Nel Blu Dipinito Di Blue” (#1, 1958)
26. Wild Cherry “Play That Funky Music” (#1, 1976)
27. Magic! “Rude” (#1, 2013)
28. Dexy’s Midnight Runners “Come on Eileen” (#1, 1983)
29. Lou Reed “Walk on the Wild Side” (#16, 1972)
30. Walter Huston “September Song” (#12, 1939)

31. Anton Karas “The Third Man Theme” (#1, 1950)
32. Harry Simeone Chorale “The Little Drummer Boy” (#13, 1958)
33. Fisk University Jubilee Quartet “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot” (#7, 1910)
34. Terry Jacks “Seasons in the Sun” (#1, 1974)
35. Lipps Inc. “Funkytown” (#1, 1980)
36. Frankie Goes to Hollywood “Relax” (#10, 1983)
37. Band Aid “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” (#13, 1984)
38. Sir Mix-A-Lot “Baby Got Back” (#1, 1992)
39. Ed Gallagher & Al Shean “Mr. Gallagher and Mr. Shean” (#1, 1922)
40. Beck “Loser” (#10, 1993)

41. Bill Snyder “Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered” (#3, 1950)
42. The Sugarhill Gang “Rapper’s Delight” (#36, 1979)
43. Big Four Quartet “Goodbye Dolly Gray” (#1, 1901)
44. Snow Patrol “Chasing Cars” (#5, 2006)
45. Big Joe Turner “Shake, Rattle and Roll” (#22, 1954)
46. Bill Medley “I’ve Had the Time of My Life” (with Jennifer Warnes, #1, 1987) *
47. Thomas Bott “Love’s Old Sweet Song” (#1, 1892)
48. The Chords “Sh-Boom” (#5, 1954)
49. Free “All Right Now” (#4, 1970)
50. Lou Bega “Mambo No. 5 (A Little Bit Of…)” (#3, 1999)

51. Gene Vincent & His Blue Caps “Be-Bop-A-Lula” (#7, 1956)
52. Van McCoy “The Hustle” (#1, 1975)
53. Jimmy Boyd “I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus” (#1, 1952)
54. Regina Belle “A Whole New World” (with Peabo Bryson, #1, 1992) *
55. Mahalia Jackson “Move on Up a Little Higher” (#21, 1948)
56. Carl Douglas “Kung Fu Fighting” (#1, 1974)
57. Lee Ann Womack & the Sons of the Desert “I Hope You Dance” (#14, 2000)
58. OMI “Cheerleader (Felix Jaehn Remix)” (#1, 2014)
59. Cecil Fanning “A Perfect Day” (#2, 1911)
60. Kentucky Serenaders “Rose of Washington Square” (#3, 1920)

61. Hozier “Take Me to Church” (#2, 2013)
62. Idina Menzel “Let It Go” (#5, 2013)
63. Everything But the Girl “Missing (Todd Terry Remix)” (#2, 1995)
64. Nicholas Orlando’s Orchestra “Till We Meet Again” (with Harry MacDonough & Charles Hart, #1, 1919) *
65. The Lumineers “Ho Hey” (#3, 20120
66. Sonny James “Young Love” (#1, 1956)
67. Charles Agnew & His Stevens Hotel Orchestra with Stanley Jacobsen “Don’t Blame Me” (#13, 1933)
68. Erroll Garner Trio “Misty” (#30, 1954)
69. Dave Brubeck Quartet “Take Five” (#25, 1959)
70. Chumbawamba “Tubthumping” (#6, 1997)

71. M.I.A. “Paper Planes” (#4, 2007)
72. U.S. Naval Academy Band “Anchors Aweigh” (#13, 1906)
73. Bill Hayes “The Ballad of Davy Crockett” (#1, 1955)
74. Hoobastank “The Reason” (#2, 2003)
75. Benny Meroff with Dusty Rhodes “Happy Days Are Here Again” (#1, 1930)
76. Paul Mauriat “Love Is Blue” (#1, 1967)
77. Clarence “Pinetop” Smith “Pinetop’s Boogie Woogie” (#20, 1929)
78. Foster the People “Pumped Up Kicks” (#3, 2010)
79. McKinney’s Cotton Pickers with George Thomas “If I Could Be with You One Hour Tonight” (#1, 1930)
80. Mr. Acker Bilk “Stranger on the Shore” (#1, 1961)

81. William Redmond “In the Good Old Summertime” (#3, 1902)
82. Tammy Wynette “Stand by Your Man” (#19, 1968)
83. Donna Lewis “I Love You Always Forever” (#2, 1996)
84. Irving Mills “Stardust” (#20, 1930)
85. Kyu Sakamoto “Sukiyaki” (#1, 1963)
86. Silentó “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae)” (#3, 2015)
87. Zager & Evans “In the Year 2525 (Exordium & Terminus)” (#1, 1969)
88. The Tornadoes “Telstar” (#1, 1962)
89. Dua Lipa “New Rules” (#6, 2017)
90. Helen Trix “The Bird on Nellie’s Hat” (#3, 1907)

91. Edith Piaf “La Vie En Rose” (#23, 1950)
92. Gorillaz “Feel Good Inc.” (with De La Soul, #14, 2005) *
93. Jeannie C. Riley “Harper Valley P.T.A.” (#1, 1968)
94. The Six Brown Brothers “Darktown Strutters’ Ball” (#10, 1917)
95. Charles Marsh “Throw Him Down, McCloskey” (#1, 1892)
96. Bobby McFerrin “Don’t Worry, Be Happy” (#1, 1988)
97. Frank Coombs “The Harbor of Love” (with William H. Thompson, #3, 1912)
98. Ma Rainey “See See Rider Blues” (#14, 1925)
99. Walk the Moon “Shut Up and Dance” (#4, 2014)
100. T-Rex “Bang a Gong (Get It On)” (#10, 1971)


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