Wednesday, December 31, 1986

Dave’s Faves: My Album Collection in 1986

Dave’s Faves:

My Album Collection in 1986

By year’s end, this was what my collection looked like. Albums acquired in 1986 are marked with an asterisk.

  1. Aha Hunting High and Low (1985) *
  2. Aha Scoundrel Days (1986) *
  3. Air Supply Lost in Love (1980)
  4. Air Supply The One That You Love (1981)
  5. Alabama Greatest Hits (compilation: 1980-86, released 1986) *
  6. Alabama The Touch (1986)
  7. Asia Asia (1982)
  8. Asia Alpha (1983)
  9. Asia Astra (1985)

  10. Bangles Different Light (1986) *
  11. The Beatles Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967)
  12. The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour (1967)
  13. The Beatles Hey Jude (1968)
  14. The Beatles 1962-1966 (compilation: 1962-66, released 1973)
  15. The Beatles 1967-1970 (compilation: 1967-70, released 1973)
  16. The Beatles 20 Greatest Hits (compilation: 1962-70, released 1982) *
  17. Pat Benatar Crimes of Passion (1980)
  18. Pat Benatar Get Nervous (1982)
  19. Pat Benatar Live from Earth (live, 1983)
  20. Pat Benatar Tropico (1984)
  21. Pat Benatar Seven the Hard Way (1985)

  22. Berlin Pleasure Victim (1983) *
  23. Berlin Love Life (1984) *
  24. Berlin Count Three and Pray (1986) *
  25. Blondie Parallel Lines (1978)
  26. Blondie Eat to the Beat (1979)
  27. Boomtown Rats In the Long Grass (1984) *
  28. Boston Third Stage (1986) *

  29. Chicago Chicago 16 (1982)
  30. Chicago Chicago 17 (1984)
  31. Phil Collins No Jacket Required (1985)

  32. David + David Boomtown (1986) *
  33. Def Leppard Pyromania (1983)
  34. John Denver Greatest Hits (compilation: 1969-72, released 1973)
  35. Dennis DeYoung Desert Moon (1984)
  36. Dennis DeYoung Back to the World (1986) *
  37. Dire Straits Brothers in Arms (1985)
  38. Neil Diamond The Jazz Singer (soundtrack, 1980)

  39. Eagles Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975 (compilation: 1971-75, released 1976)
  40. Eagles Greatest Hits Volume 2 (released 1982)
  41. Eurythmics In the Garden (1981)
  42. Eurythmics Sweet Dreams Are Made of This (1983)
  43. Eurythmics Touch (1983)
  44. Eurythmics 1984 (For the Love of Big Brother) (1984)
  45. Eurythmics Be Yourself Tonight (1985)

  46. Dan Fogelberg Greatest Hits (compilation: 1972-82, released 1982)
  47. Foreigner 4 (1981)
  48. Foreigner Records (compilation: 1976-82, released 1982)
  49. Foreigner Agent Provocateur (1984)

  50. Peter Gabriel So (1986) *
  51. J. Geils Band Freeze Frame (1981)
  52. Genesis Genesis (1983)
  53. Genesis Invisible Touch (1986) *

  54. Daryl Hall & John Oates H2O (1982)
  55. Daryl Hall & John Oates Rock ‘N’ Soul Part I (compilation: (1973-83, released 1983)
  56. Don Henley Building the Perfect Beast (1984)
  57. Hooters Nervous Night (1985)

  58. Michael Jackson Off the Wall (1979)
  59. Michael Jackson Thriller (1982)
  60. Billy Joel Turnstiles (1976) *
  61. Billy Joel The Stranger (1977)
  62. Billy Joel The Nylon Curtain (1982)
  63. Billy Joel An Innocent Man (1983)
  64. Billy Joel Greatest Hits Volume I & II (compilation: 1973-85, released 1985)
  65. Billy Joel The Bridge (1986) *
  66. Journey Captured (live, 1981)
  67. Journey Escape (1981)
  68. Journey Frontiers (1983)
  69. Journey Raised on Radio (1986) *

  70. Cyndi Lauper She’s So Unusual (1983)
  71. Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin IV (1971)
  72. Huey Lewis & the News Sports (1983)

  73. Barry Manilow Greatest Hits (compilation, released 1978)
  74. Marillion Script for a Jester’s Tear (1983) *
  75. Marillion Fugazi (1984) *
  76. Marillion Real to Reel (live, 1984) *
  77. Marillion Misplaced Childhood (1985) *
  78. Marillion Brief Encounter (EP, 1986) *
  79. John Cougar (Mellencamp) American Fool (1982)
  80. John Cougar Mellencamp Uh-Huh (1983)
  81. John Cougar Mellencamp Scarecrow (1985)
  82. Men at Work Business As Usual (1981)
  83. Men at Work Cargo (1983)
  84. Men at Work Two Hearts (1985)
  85. The Moody Blues This Is the Moody Blues (compilation: 1967-72, released 1974) *
  86. The Moody Blues Voices in the Sky (compilation: 1967-82, released 1984) *
  87. The Moody Blues The Other Side of Life (1986) *

  88. Olivia Newton-John Greatest Hits (compilation: 1971-76, released 1977)
  89. Olivia Newton-John Totally Hot (1978)
  90. Olivia Newton-John/Electric Light Orchestra Xanadu (soundtrack, 1980)
  91. Olivia Newton-John Physical (1981)
  92. Olivia Newton-John Olivia’s Greatest Hits Vol. 2 (compilation: 1978-82, released 1982)
  93. Olivia Newton-John Soul Kiss (1985)
  94. Stevie Nicks The Wild Heart (1983)

  95. Alan Parsons Project I Robot (1977) *
  96. Alan Parsons Project The Turn of a Friendly Card (1980) *
  97. Alan Parsons Project Eye in the Sky (1982) *
  98. Alan Parsons Project The Best of (compilation: 1977-83, released 1983)
  99. Alan Parsons Project Ammonia Avenue (1984)
  100. Alan Parsons Project Vulture Culture (1985)
  101. Alan Parsons Project Stereotomy (1986) *
  102. Steve Perry Street Talk (1984)
  103. Pink Floyd The Dark Side of the Moon (1973)
  104. Pink Floyd The Wall (1979)
  105. The Police Outlandos D’Amour (1978)
  106. The Police Reggatta De Blanc (1979)
  107. The Police Zenyatta Mondatta (1980)
  108. The Police Ghost in the Machine (1981)
  109. The Police Synchronicity (1983)
  110. Prince 1999 (1982)
  111. Prince & the Revolution Purple Rain (1984)
  112. Prince & the Revolution Around the World in a Day (1985)

  113. Queen Greatest Hits (compilation: 1973-81, released 1981)

  114. The Rainmakers The Rainmakers (1986) *
  115. REO Speedwagon Hi Infidelity (1980)
  116. REO Speedwagon Wheels Are Turnin’ (1984)
  117. Kenny Rogers Greatest Hits (compilation: 1977-80, released 1980)
  118. Lionel Richie Can’t Slow Down (1983)
  119. Lionel Richie Dancing on the Ceiling (1986) *
  120. Rush All the World’s a Stage (live, 1976) *
  121. Rush Moving Pictures (1981)
  122. Rush Exit…Stage Left (live, 1981)

  123. Charlie Sexton Pictures for Pleasure (1985) *
  124. Paul Simon Graceland (1986) *
  125. Bruce Springsteen Darkness on the Edge of Town (1978) *
  126. Bruce Springsteen Born in the U.S.A. (1984)
  127. Bruce Springsteen Live 1975/1985 (live box set, 1986) *

  128. Squeeze 45s and Under (compilation: 1977-82, released 1982) *
  129. Squeeze Cosi Fan Tutti Frutti (1985) *
  130. Sting The Dream of the Blue Turtles (1985)
  131. Sting Bring on the Night (live, 1986) *

  132. Styx Styx I (1972)
  133. Styx Styx II (1973)
  134. Styx The Serpent Is Rising (1973) *
  135. Styx Man of Miracles (1974) *
  136. Styx Best of Styx (compilation: 1972-74)
  137. Styx Equinox (1975)
  138. Styx Crystal Ball (1976)
  139. Styx The Grand Illusion (1977)
  140. Styx Pieces of Eight (1978)
  141. Styx Cornerstone (1979)
  142. Styx Paradise Theater (1981)
  143. Styx Kilroy Was Here (1983)
  144. Styx Caught in the Act (live, 1984)
  145. Supertramp Famous Last Words (1982)
  146. Supertramp Brother Where You Bound (1985)

  147. Tears for Fears The Hurting (1983)
  148. Tears for Fears Songs from the Big Chair (1985)
  149. Toto Toto IV (1982)

  150. U2 War (1983) *
  151. U2 Under a Blood Red Sky (live, 1983) *

  152. Van Halen 5150 (1986) *

  153. John Williams (composer) Star Wars IV: A New Hope (soundtrack, 1977)

  154. Yes The Yes Album (1971)
  155. Yes Fragile (1971)
  156. Yes Classic Yes (compilation: 1971-77, released 1981)
  157. Yes 90125 (1983)

  158. ZZ Top Afterburner (1985)

    Various Artists:

  159. Brimstone and Treacle (soundtrack, 1982)
  160. Flashdance (soundtrack, 1983)
  161. Footloose (soundtrack, 1984)
  162. K-Tel: High Energy (1979)
  163. K-Tel: Starflight (1979)
  164. K-Tel: Wings of Sound (1979)
  165. Legend (soundtrack, 1986) *
  166. Pretty in Pink (soundtrack, 1986) *
  167. St. Elmo’s Fire (soundtrack, 1985) *
  168. Two of a Kind (soundtrack, 1983)
  169. Vision Quest (soundtrack, 1985)
  170. We Are the World (1985)

Resources and Related Links:


First posted 8/31/2021.

Pop Memories: The Top 100 Songs, 1890-1954

Pop Memories:

Top 100 Songs, 1890-1954

Billboard magazine has long been the music chart industry leader with its flagship Hot 100 chart, which launched in 1958. Prior to that, Billboard did other charts, but the farther back one dips into recorded history, the more difficult it is to find music charts from Billboard or any other source. Pop Memories 1890-1954 taps multiple sources from the pre-rock era to create music charts.

This particular webpage takes the list from that book of the top 100 songs from 1890 to 1954, as determined first by the most weeks spent at #1, tne by total weeks on the chart.

Check other lists based on charts, sales, and airplay here.


17 weeks:

1. Francis Craig with Bob Lamm “Near You” (1947)


14 weeks:

2. Bing Crosby with the Ken Darby Singers “White Christmas” (1942)


13 weeks:

3. Artie Shaw “Frenesi” (1940)
4. Gene Austin “My Blue Heaven” (1927)
5. Patti Page “Tennessee Waltz” (1950)
6. Harry James with Helen Forrest “I’ve Heard That Song Before” (1943)
7. The Weavers with Gordon Jenkins’ Orchestra “Goodnight Irene” (1950)
8. Ben Selvin “Dardanella” (1920)
9. The Ink Spots “The Gypsy” (1946)
10. Ted Weems with Elmo Tanner “Heartaches” (1947)


12 weeks:

11. The Mills Brothers “Paper Doll” (1942)
12. Vernon Dalhart “The Prisoner’s Song” (1925)
13. Glenn Miller “In the Mood” (1939)
14. Jo Stafford “You Belong to Me” (1952)
15. Vaughn Monroe “Riders in the Sky (A Cowboy Legend)” (1949)
16. Tommy Dorsey with Frank Sinatra “I’ll Never Smile Again” (1940)
17. Al Jolson “Sonny Boy” (1928)


11 weeks:

18. Les Paul with Mary Ford “Vaya Con Dios (May God Be with You)” (1953)
19. Anton Karas “The Third Man Theme” (1950)
20. Guy Lombardo “The Third Man Theme” (1950)

21. Johnnie Ray & the Four Lads “Cry” (1951)
22. Frankie Carle & Marjorie Hughes “Oh What It Seemed to Be” (1946)
23. Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra “Whispering” (1920)
24. Leo Reisman & His Orchestra with Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers “Cheek to Cheek” (1935)
25. American Quartet with Billy Murray “Casey Jones” (1910)
26. Haydn Quartet “Put on Your Old Grey Bonnet” (1909)
27. Al Jolson “April Showers” (1922)
28. Paul Whiteman & His Orchestra with Franklyn Baur “Valencia (A Song of Spain)” (1926)
29. Bryon G. Harlan “School Days (When We Were a Couple of Kids)” (1907)
30. Henry Burr “Just a Baby’s Prayer at Twilight (For Her Daddy Over There)” (1918)

31. Arthur Collins “The Preacher and the Bear” (1905)
32. Len Spencer “The Arkansaw Traveler” (1902)


10 weeks:

33. Tony Bennett “Because of You” (1951)
34. Bing Crosby with Lani McIntire & His Hawaiians “Sweet Leilani” (1937)
35. Dinah Shore & Her Harper Valley Boys “Buttons and Bows” (1948)
36. Kay Starr “Wheel of Fortune” (1952)
37. Percy Faith with Felicia Sanders “Where Is Your Heart (Song from “Moulin Rouge”)” (1953)
38. Ted Lewis & His Band “In a Shanty in Old Shanty Town” (1932)
39. Vaughn Monroe’s Orchestra “Ballerina” (1947)
40. Patti Page “I Went to Your Wedding” (1952)

41. Rudy Vallee & His Connecticut Yankees “Stein Song (University of Maine)” (1930)
42. The Andrews Sisters with Vic Schoen’s Orchestra “Rum and Coca-Cola” (1945)
43. Perry Como “Till the End of Time” (1945)
44. Ella Fitzgerald with Chick Webb & His Orchestra “A-Tisket, A-Tasket” (1938)
45. Nick Lucas “Tip-Toe Thru the Tulips with Me” (1929)
46. Glenn Miller Orchestra with Ray Eberle & The Modernaires “Moonlight Cocktail” (1942)
47. Leo Reisman’s Orchestra with Fred Astaire “Night and Day” (1932)
48. Arthur Collins with Bryon G. Harlan “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911)
49. Jimmy Dorsey & His Orchestra with Bob Eberly & Helen O’Connell “Amapola (Pretty Little Poppy)” (1941)
50. Haydn Quartet “Sweet Adeline (You’re the Flower of My Heart)” (1904)

51. Eileen Barton “If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d’ve Baked a Cake” (1950)
52. Bing Crosby with George Stoll’s Orchestra “Pennies from Heaven” (1936)
53. Billy Murray “You’re a Grand Old Flag (aka “The Grand Old Rag”)” (1906)
54. George J. Gaskin “My Old New Hampshire Home” (1898)
55. Bryon G. Harlan “My Gal Sal” (1907)
56. George J. Gaskin “On the Banks of the Wabash” (1897)
57. George J. Gaskin “After the Ball” (1893)
58. George W. Johnson “The Laughing Song” (1891)
59. Dan Quinn “The Band Played On” (1895)


9 weeks:

60. Les Brown with Doris Day “Sentimental Journey” (1945)
61. Bing Crosby with John Scottt Trotter’s Orchestra “Swinging on a Star” (1944)
62. Kitty Kallen “Little Things Mean a Lot” (1954)
63. Glenn Miller with Tex Beneke & the Four Modernaires “Chattanooga Choo Choo” (1941)
64. Les Paul & Mary Ford “How High the Moon” (1951)
65. George Olsen with Joe Morrison “The Last Round-Up” (1933)
66. The Andrews Sisters “Shoo-Shoo Baby” (1943)
67. Peggy Lee “Manana Is Soon Enough for Me” (1948)
68. Vera Lynn with Ronald Shaw’s Orchestra “Auf Wiederseh’n Sweetheart” (1952)
69. The Crew-Cuts “Sh-Boom” (1954)
70. Bing Crosby “Only Forever” (1940)

71. Glenn Miller “Tuxedo Junction” (1940)
72. American Quartet “Over There” (1917)
73. Frankie Carle & Marjorie Hughes “Rumors Are Flying” (1946)
74. Al Jolson “Swanee” (1920)
75. Bryon G. Harlan “Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie” (1906)
76. Billy Murray with the Haydn Quartet “By the Light of the Silvery Moon” (1910)
77. Henry Burr with Albert Campbell “Till We Meet Again” (1919)
78. Henry Burr “Beautiful Ohio” (1919)
79. Harry MacDonough with Elise Stevenson (as Miss Walton) “Shine on, Harvest Moon” (1909)
80. Billy Murray “Meet Me in St. Louis, Louis” (1904)

81. Billy Murray “Harrigan” (1907)
82. Bert Williams “Nobody” (1906)
83. Larry Clinton with Bea Wain “Deep Purple” (1939)
84. Dan Quinn “Daisy Bell (A Bicycle Built for Two)” (1893)
85. Dan Quinn “The Sidewalks of New York” (1895)


8 weeks:

86. Al Dexter & His Troopers “Pistol Packin’ Mama” (1943)
87. Pee Wee Hunt “Twelfth Street Rag” (1948)
88. The Ames Brothers “You, You, You” (1953)
89. Nat “King” Cole “Mona Lisa” (1950)
90. The Harmonicats “Peg O’ My Heart” (1947)

91. Tony Bennett “Rags to Riches” (1953)
92. Freddy Martin & Jack Fina “Piano Concerto in B Flat” (1941)
93. Perry Como “If (They Made Me King)” (1951)
94. Eddy Howard “To Each His Own” (1946)
95. Eddy Howard “Sin (It’s No Sin)” (1951)
96. Perry Como “Wanted” (1954)
97. Frankie Laine with Jud Conlon’s Rhythmaires “That Lucky Old Sun” (1949)
98. Bing Crosby & the Andrews Sisters “Don’t Fence Me In” (1944)
99. Dinah Shore “The Gypsy” (1946)
100. Patti Page “The Doggie in the Window” (1953)


Resources/Related Links:


First posted 12/21/2022.

Pop Memories 1890-1954

Pop Memories:

1890-1954

My personal book shelves are loaded with more than a hundred books devoted to music. This one, however, is the most important of them all. The book was published by Record Research, a company started by Joel Whitburn which became the go-to resource for books on the Billboard charts. The book also features invaluable research from Steve Sullivan, who has become the individual most responsible for sparking my interest in music of the pre-rock era.

I became a chart fanatic in the 1980s because of American Top 40, a weekly radio countdown show based on Billboard’s pop charts. The magazine was founded in 1894 as a trade publication for, well, billboards. However, it expanded in the early years of the 20th century to cover the entertainment industry in general and then later keying in on the music industry. Their first music charts in 1913 focused on sheet music. Over the years, they’ve developed multiple charts focused on music, but the Billboard Hot 100, which tracks the most popular songs in the United States on a weekly basis, has become the industry standard.

However, other charts have existed over the years and Pop Memories serves as an invaluable resource to early Billboard charts as well as other chart sources. Here are some of the sources cited on page 7 of the 1986 edition:

  • The Phonogram (early 1890s), record industry periodical
  • The Phonoscope (1896-1899), monthly lists of popular recordings
  • Hobbies Magazine (1900-1920s), Jim Walsh columns on music
  • Talking Machine World (1905-1921), monthly record industry periodical, lists of best sellers
  • Billboard (1913-1918), most popular vaudeville songs
  • Billboard magazine (1920s), hit records and songs of the era, regular charts by 1934 for radio airplay and sheet music sales
  • Variety magazine (1920s), hit records and songs of the era, monthly rankings of best-selling records starting in 1929
  • Your Hit Parade (1935-1940), weekly rankings
  • Billboard (1938-1954), weekly lists of the most popular records in jukeboxes
  • Billboard (1940-1954), began first comprehensive chart of best selling records from all labels
  • Billboard (1945-1954), chart of most played songs by disc jockeys
  • ASCAP
  • record label catalogs and publications
  • sheet music sales


Dave’s Music Database lists based on Pop Memories:


Resources/Related Links:

  • Dave’s Music Database: “Lists Based on Charts, Sales, and Airplay
  • Joel Whitburn (1986). Pop Memories 1890-1954. Menomonee Falls, WI; Record Research, Inc.
  • Joel Whitburn (2016). Pop Memories 1900-1940. Menomonee Falls, WI; Record Research, Inc.
  • Joel Whitburn (2002). Billboard Pop Hits – Singles & Albums, 1940-1954. Menomonee Falls, WI; Record Research, Inc.


First posted 12/21/2022.

Pop Memories 1890-1954 – Top 100 Artists

image from recordresearch.com

This list is taken from page 623 of Joel Whitburn’s Pop Memories 1890-1954. That book was designed as a companion to the Billboard books which tracked the songs which charted on the Hot 100 from 1955 to the present. The book lists acts alphabetically and all their hits, including peak position and date first charted. This list was created by totaling each act’s chart points.

1. Bing Crosby
2. Paul Whiteman
3. Guy Lombardo
4. Tommy Dorsey
5. Billy Murray
6. Benny Goodman
7. Glenn Miller
8. Henry Burr
9. Peerless Quartet
10. Harry MacDonough

11. Ben Selvin
12. Ted Lewis
13. Al Jolson
14. Sammy Kaye
15. Arthur Collins and Byron Harlan
16. Perry Como
17. Jimmy Dorsey
18. Frank Sinatra
19. Charles Adams Prince
20. The Andrews Sisters

21. Freddy Martin
22. Kay Kyser
23. John McCormack
24. Leo Reisman
25. Isham Jones
26. Rudy Vallee
27. Eddy Duchin
28. American Quartet
29. Dinah Shore
30. Harry James

31. Jo Stafford
32. Haydn Quartet
33. Ada Jones
34. Duke Ellington
35. Louis Armstrong
36. Vaughn Monroe
37. Fats Waller
38. Glen Gray
39. Jan Garber
40. Hal Kemp

41. The Mills Brothers
42. Ruth Etting
43. Byron Harlan
44. Gene Austin
45. Ray Noble
46. Russ Morgan
47. Nat Shilkret
48. Fred Waring
49. Arthur Collins
50. Nat “King” Cole

51. Albert Campbell
52. Artie Shaw
53. George Olsen
54. Horace Heidt
55. Len Spencer
56. Frankie Laine
57. Ada Jones and Billy Murray
58. Enrico Caruso
59. Woody Herman
60. Frank Stanley

61. Marion Harris
62. Cal Stewart
63. The Ink Spots
64. Eddy Howard
65. Ella Fitzgerald
66. Ben Bernie
67. Dick Haymes
68. Walter Van Brunt
69. Patti Page
70. Nora Bayes

71. Dan Quinn
72. Eddie Fisher
73. Bob Crosby
74. Fred Astaire
75. Larry Clinton
76. Cab Calloway
77. Shep Fields
78. Margaret Whiting
79. George J. Gaskin
80. Charles Harrison

81. Doris Day
82. Bert Williams
83. Billie Holiday
84. Teddy Wilson
85. Ozzie Nelson
86. J.W. Myers
87. Ted Weems
88. Wayne King
89. Tony Martin
90. Vic Damone

91. Lewis James
92. Frank Crumit
93. Peggy Lee
94. Vincent Lopez
95. Cliff Edwrads
96. John Phillip Sousa
97. Vess Ossman
98. Connee Boswell
99. Kay Starr
100. Johnny Mercer


Resources:
  • Joel Whitburn (1991). Pop Memories 1890-1954. Record Research: Menomonee Falls, WI. Page 623.

Saturday, December 20, 1986

The Bangles hit #1 with “Walk Like an Egyptian”

Walk Like an Egyptian

The Bangles

Writer(s): Liam Sternberg (see lyrics here)


Released: September 1, 1986


First Charted: September 13, 1986


Peak: 14 US, 11 CB, 12 RR, 1 CO, 3 UK, 11 CN, 12 AU, 5 DF (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 1.0 US, 0.25 UK, 1.3 world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 132.6 video, 187.45 streaming

Awards:

Click on award for more details.

About the Song:

Liam Sternberg was part of the Akron, Ohio, music scene in the ‘70s. He worked with Jane Aire & the Belvederes and wrote songs for Rachel Sweet, but didn’t find any real success. He did, however, find one-hit wonder status as a songwriter with “Walk Like an Egytian.” While riding a ferry boat across the English Channel, he noticed that as people struggled to maintain their balance, they held up their arms like they were doing Egyptian movements. SF

He recorded a demo of the song with singer Marti Jones in 1984. He offered it to Toni Basil, who had a #1 hit in 1982 with “Mickey,” but she turned it down. Lene Lovich recorded the song, but she decided to take a break from music to raise a family and the song went unreleased. Dave Kahne, who produced the Bangles’ Different Light album, got a copy of the demo and presented it to the Bangles.

He had each of the four members sing the song, eventually opting to have Vicki Peterson, Michael Steele, and Susanna Hoffs each sing a verse. WK Kahne didn’t like Debbie Peterson’s vocal, so he relegated her to backing vocals. She was even more angry when a drum machine was also used instead of her drumming. WK As for the whistling in the song – none of them do it. It was done by machine. WK

The band didn’t think the song would be released because it was “a goofy romp” and “too weird.” SF However, it was the third single from the Different Light album, following the success of the #2 hit “Manic Monday” and “If She Knew What She Wants” (#29). It became their best-selling album with 3 million copies and highest charting, reaching #2. Not only did “Walk Like an Egyptian” go to #1 in the U.S., but became Billboard magazine’s top song of the year.


Resources:

  • FB Fred Bronson (2007). The Billboard Book of Number One Hits (4th edition). Billboard Books: New York, NY. Page 656.
  • SF Songfacts
  • WK Wikipedia


Related Links:


First posted 12/8/2020; last updated 9/25/2022.

The Beastie Boys charted with “Fight for Your Right”

You Gotta Fight for Your Right to Party

Beastie Boys

Writer(s): Adam Yauch, Rick Rubin, Adam Horovitz (see lyrics here)


First Charted: December 20, 1986


Peak: 7 US, 3 CB, 12 RR, 1 CO, 11 UK, 7 CN, 37 AU, 6 DF (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): -- US, 0.2 UK


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 81.7 video, 168.24 streaming

Awards:

Click on award for more details.

About the Song:

The fourth single from the Beastie Boys’ debut album made them a household name. Their goofy wit and party atmosphere endured them to millions – millions who flocked to buy the parent album, Licensed to Ill and give the Beasties the distinction of being the first rap group in U.S. history to hit #1 on the Billboard album chart.

The song – and the success of the album – owed much to the Beasties’ combination of metal and rap. The Beastie Boys were “just three kids from rich New York families who liked black culture.” TC With the help of producer Rick Rubin, they merged the sounds of Led Zeppelin with the style of old school rap. It wasn’t the first time rock and rap had found chart success – just months earlier, Rubin helped Run-D.M.C. get a top 5 U.S. pop hit with their remake of Aerosmith’s “Walk This Way” – aided by Aerosmith’s own Steven Tyler and Joe Perry.

“Fight for Your Right” was intended as a parody of the kind of “beer-soaked, panty-raiding rock jam that ruled fraternity houses and dingy bars alike.” TB The video, which depicted “the party that is every suburban parent’s worst nightmare” TB played up the parody and garnered it plenty of spins on MTV.

Unfortunately, as member Mike D said, “There were tons of guys singing along to ‘Fight for Your Right’ who were oblivious to the fact it was a total goof on them.” WK In fact, the song was reportedly cut just as a joke. Once the group became superstars thanks to their new frat-boy fanbase, they played up the roles until, according to Beastie Boy Adam “MCA” Yauch, they had become their own joke. SF

In time, the group would come to be very respected for their experimental music and ability to merge different genres. Rap group Public Enemy was on board early, even sampling the song for their own 1988 “Party for Your Right to Fight.”


Resources:

  • TC Toby Creswell (2005). 1001 Songs: The Great Songs of All Time. Thunder’s Mouth Press: New York, NY. Page 14.
  • SF Songfacts.com
  • TB Thunder Bay Press (2006). Singles: Six Decades of Hot Hits & Classic Cuts. Outline Press Ltd.: San Diego, CA. Page 228.
  • WK Wikipedia.org


Related Links:


First posted 12/20/2011; last updated 10/29/2022.