Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Top 50 Operas of All Time

image from czechtourism.com

This list was created, as are most DMDB lists, by aggregating multiple best-of lists, both those focused specifically on opera and those on all albums/works regardless of genre, alongside sales, chart data, and album ratings. Here are the results:

1. Claudio Monteverdi: L’Orfeo (Orpheus) (1607)
2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Don Giovanni (1787)
3. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro) (1786)
4. Richard Wagner: Der Ring Des Nibelungen (The Ring Cycle) (1874)
5. Richard Wagner: Tristan Und Isolde (1859)
6. Georges Bizet: Carmen (1875)
7. Gioacchino Rossini: Il Barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville) (1816)
8. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Die Zauberflote (The Magic Flute) (1791)
9. George Gershwin/Ira Gershwin/Dubose Heyward: Porgy and Bess (1935)
10. Giacomo Puccini: Tosca (1900)

11. Giacomo Puccini: La Bohème (The Bohemian Life) (1896)
12. Giuseppe Verdi: La Traviata (The Fallen Woman) (1853)
13. Claudio Monteverdi: L’incoronazione di Poppea (The Coronation of Poppaea) (1642)
14. Giuseppe Verdi: Aida (1871)
15. Giacomo Puccini: Turandot (1926)
16. Giuseppe Verdi: Rigoletto: La Donna È Mobile (1851)
17. Henry Purcell: Dido and Aeneas (1689)
18. Giacomo Puccini: Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) (1904)
19. George Friedrich Händel: Giulio Cesare in Egitto (Julius Caesar in Egypt) (1724)
20. Luciano Pavarotti with Placido Domingo & Jose Carreras: The Three Tenors in Concert/Mehta (live: 1990)

21. Ludwig van Beethoven: Fidelio (1805)
22. Vincenzo Bellini: Norma (1831)
23. Andrea Bocelli: Romanza (1997)
24. Richard Strauss: Der Rosenkavalier (The Knight of the Rose) (1911)
25. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Die Entfuhrung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio) (1781)
26. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Cosí Fan Tutte (Thus Do They All) (1790)
27. Gaetano Donizetti: Lucia di Lammermoor (1911)
28. Christoph Willibald Gluck: Orfeo ed Euridice (Orpheus and Eurydice) (1762)
29. Giuseppe Verdi: Otello (1887)
30. Alban Berg: Wozzeck (1922)

31. Giuseppi Verdi: Il Trovatore (The Troubador) (1853)
32. Modest Mussorgsky: Boris Godunov (1873)
33. Christoph Willibald Gluck: Iphigenie en Tauride (Pphigenia in Tauris) (1779)
34. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Idomeneo (1781)
35. Gaetano Donizetti: L'Elisir d'Amore (The Elixir of Love) (1873)
36. Richard Wagner: Der Fliegende Hollander (aka 'The Flying Dutchman') (1843)
37. Gioacchino Rossini: Guillaume Tell (William Tell) (1829)
38. Richard Wagner: Lohengrin (1850)
39. Pietro Mascagni: Cavalleria Rusticana (Rustic Chivalry) (1890)
40. Gioacchino Rossini: La Cenerentola (Cinderella) (1817)

41. Richard Wagner: Die Meistersinger Von Nurnberg (The Master-Singers of Nuremburg) (1868)
42. Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsk: Eugene Onegin (1879)
43. Jules Massenet: Manon (1884)
44. Carl Maria von Weber: Der Freishchutz (The Marksman) (1821)
45. Hector Berlioz: La Damanation of Faust (The Damnation of Faust) (1846)
46. Giuseppe Verdi: Nabucco (Nebuchadnezzar) (1842)
47. Charles Gounod: Faust (1859)
48. Richard Wagner: Tannhauser (1845)
49. Giuseppe Verdi: Don Carlos (1867)
50. Claude Debussy: Pelléas et Mélisande (1902)


1 comment:

  1. Interesting blog, it reminds me of Giuseppe Verdi, one of his most successful opera is La Traviata, which means “the fallen woman” or “the one who goes astray” and in context it connotes the loss of sexual innocence.
    I tried to write a blog about it, hope you also like it https://stenote.blogspot.com/2019/06/an-interview-with-giuseppe.html.

    ReplyDelete