Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Passenger’s “Let Her Go” released

Updated date.

image from flutenotes.ph

Let Her Go

Passenger

Writer(s): Mike Rosenberg (see lyrics here)


Released: 7/24/2012


First Charted: April 2013


Peak: 5 US, 14 AC, 14 AA, 2 UK, 5 CN, 15 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales *: 4.0 US, 1.83 UK, 8.2 world (includes US + UK)


Radio Airplay *: --


Video Airplay *: 2189.21


Streaming *: 839.00


* in millions

Review:

Passenger is actually the moniker used by British indie pop/folk/rock singer/songwriter Mike Rosenberg. It started out as a group, but the other three members bolted in 2009 and Rosenberg kept the name. He released his third album, All the Little Lights, under the name in 2012. “Let Her Go” was the second single from the album. It topped the charts in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, and Switzerland. SF It won the British Academy’s Ivor Novello Award for Most Performed Work. WK

He came up with the song while finishing a set at a university bar in Australia. He was the supporting act and was met with utter indifference. While feeling down, he came up with the idea for the song about his ex-girlfriend. SF The woman he wrote about knows it is about her. He told Rolling Stone “We’re good friends now…I think she’s still kind of got mixed feelings about it. She’s happy for me, but it is pretty weird.” SF

Rosenberg told Female First that “the song has two meanings. The first is quite literal as I wrote it after a break up and it is about letting her go. But then there is a bigger idea going on and is more about not really understanding and knowing what you have until it is gone.” SF He told VH1 that while he “definitely felt like it had something,” he “didn’t believe I could have a song on the radio, because generally, folk music doesn’t get on commercial radio…I kinda thought that that kind of success was for other people.” SF


Resources and Related Links:

Note: Footnotes (raised letter codes) refer to sources frequently cited on the blog. Numbers following the letter code indicate page numbers. If the raised letter code is a link, it will go directly to the correct page instead of the home page of a website. You can find the sources and corresponding footnotes on the “Lists” page in the “Song Resources” section.

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