Sunday, January 26, 2020

The Grammy Song and Record of the Year Winners Ranked

Originally posted 1/19/2012; updated 1/26/2020.

The Grammy Awards have been given annually since 1958. Two of the most prestigious awards are Record of the Year (given to the performers) and Song of the Year (given to the songwriters). Below is a listing of all songs to receive either award. Following that is a ranking by the DMDB of all those songs.

  • 2020 RECORD/SONG: Billie Eilish “Bad Guy” (2019)
  • 2019 RECORD/SONG: Childish Gambino “This Is America” (2018)
  • 2018 SONG: Bruno Mars “That’s What I Like” (2016)
  • 2018 RECORD: Bruno Mars “24K Magic” (2016)
  • 2017 RECORD/SONG: Adele “Hello” (2015)
  • 2016 SONG: Ed Sheeran “Thinking Out Loud” (2014)
  • 2016 RECORD: Mark Ronson with Bruno Mars “Uptown Funk!” (2014)
  • 2015 RECORD/SONG: Sam Smith “Stay with Me” (2014)
  • 2014 SONG: Lorde “Royals” (2013)
  • 2014 RECORD: Daft Punk with Pharrell Williams “Get Lucky” (2013)
  • 2013 SONG: Fun with Janelle Monáe “We Are Young” (2012)
  • 2013 RECORD: Gotye with Kimbra “Somebody That I Used to Know” (2011)
  • 2012 RECORD/SONG: Adele “Rolling in the Deep” (2010)
  • 2011 RECORD/SONG: Lady Antebellum “Need You Now” (2009)
  • 2010 SONG: Beyoncé “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” (2008)
  • 2010 RECORD: Kings of Leon “Use Somebody” (2008)

  • 2009 SONG: Coldplay “Viva La Vida” (2008)
  • 2009 RECORD: Robert Plant with Alison Krauss “Please Read the Letter” (2007)
  • 2008 RECORD/SONG: Amy Winehouse “Rehab” (2006)
  • 2007 RECORD/SONG: Dixie Chicks “Not Ready to Make Nice” (2006)
  • 2006 SONG: U2 “Sometimes You Can’t Make It on Your Own” (2005)
  • 2006 RECORD: Green Day “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” (2004)
  • 2005 SONG: John Mayer “Daughters” (2004)
  • 2005 RECORD: Ray Charles with Norah Jones “Here We Go Again” (2004)
  • 2004 SONG: Luther Vandross “Dance with My Father” (2003)
  • 2004 RECORD: Coldplay “Clocks” (2002)
  • 2003 RECORD/SONG: Norah Jones “Don’t Know Why” (2002)
  • 2002 SONG: Alicia Keys “Fallin’” (2001)
  • 2002 RECORD: U2 “Walk On” (2001)
  • 2001 RECORD/SONG: U2 “Beautiful Day” (2000)
  • 2000 RECORD/SONG: Santana with Rob Thomas “Smooth” (1999)

  • 1999 RECORD/SONG: Celine Dion “My Heart Will Go On” (1997)
  • 1998 RECORD/SONG: Shawn Colvin “Sunny Came Home” (1997)
  • 1997 RECORD/SONG: Eric Clapton “Change the World” (1996)
  • 1996 RECORD/SONG: Seal “Kiss from a Rose” (1994)
  • 1995 SONG: Bruce Springsteen “Streets of Philadelphia” (1994)
  • 1995 RECORD: Sheryl Crow “All I Wanna Do” (1994)
  • 1994 SONG: Peabo Bryson with Regina Belle “A Whole New World” (1992)
  • 1994 RECORD: Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You” (1992)
  • 1993 RECORD/SONG: Eric Clapton “Tears in Heaven” (1992)
  • 1992 RECORD/SONG: Natalie Cole with Nat “King” Cole “Unforgettable” (1991)
  • 1991 SONG: Bette Midler “From a Distance” (1990)
  • 1991 RECORD: Phil Collins “Another Day in Paradise” (1989)
  • 1990 RECORD/SONG: Bette Midler “Wind Beneath My Wings” (1989)

  • 1989 RECORD/SONG: Bobby McFerrin “Don’t Worry Be Happy” (1988)
  • 1988 SONG: Linda Ronstadt with James Ingram “Somewhere Out There” (1986)
  • 1988 RECORD: Paul Simon “Graceland” (1986)
  • 1987 SONG: Dionne Warwick & Friends “That's What Friends Are For” (1985)
  • 1987 RECORD: Steve Winwood “Higher Love” (1986)
  • 1986 RECORD/SONG: USA for Africa “We Are the World” (1985)
  • 1985 RECORD/SONG: Tina Turner “What’s Love Got to Do with It” (1984)
  • 1984 SONG: The Police “Every Breath You Take” (1983)
  • 1984 RECORD: Michael Jackson “Beat It” (1983)
  • 1983 SONG: Willie Nelson “Always on My Mind” (1982)
  • 1983 RECORD: Toto “Rosanna” (1982)
  • 1982 RECORD/SONG: Kim Carnes “Bette Davis Eyes” (1981)
  • 1981 RECORD/SONG: Christopher Cross “Sailing” (1980)
  • 1980 RECORD/SONG: The Doobie Brothers “What a Fool Believes” (1979)

  • 1979 RECORD/SONG: Billy Joel “Just the Way You Are” (1977)
  • 1978 SONG (tie): Debby Boone “You Light Up My Life” (1977)
  • 1978 SONG (tie): Barbra Streisand “Evergreen (Love Theme from ‘A Star Is Born’)” (1976)
  • 1978 RECORD: Eagles “Hotel California” (1977)
  • 1977 SONG: Barry Manilow “I Write the Songs” (1975)
  • 1977 RECORD: George Benson “This Masquerade” (1976)
  • 1976 SONG: Judy Collins “Send in the Clowns” (1975)
  • 1976 RECORD: Captain & Tennille “Love Will Keep Us Together” (1975)
  • 1975 SONG: Barbra Streisand “The Way We Were” (1973)
  • 1975 RECORD: Olivia Newton-John “I Honestly Love You” (1974)
  • 1974 RECORD/SONG: Roberta Flack “Killing Me Softly with His Song” (1973)
  • 1973 RECORD/SONG: Roberta Flack “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” (1972)
  • 1972 SONG: Carole King/James Taylor “You’ve Got a Friend” (1971)
  • 1972 RECORD: Carole King “It’s Too Late” (1971)
  • 1971 RECORD/SONG: Simon & Garfunkel “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (1970)
  • 1970 SONG: Joe South “Games People Play” (1968)
  • 1970 RECORD: The Fifth Dimension “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” (1969)

  • 1969 SONG: Roger Miller “Little Green Apples” (1968)
  • 1969 RECORD: Simon & Garfunkel “Mrs. Robinson” (1968)
  • 1968 RECORD/SONG: The Fifth Dimension “Up, Up and Away” (1967)
  • 1967 SONG: The Beatles “Michelle” (1965)
  • 1967 RECORD: Frank Sinatra “Strangers in the Night” (1966)
  • 1966 SONG: Tony Bennett “The Shadow of Your Smile (Love Theme from ‘The Sandpiper’)” (1965)
  • 1966 RECORD: Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass “A Taste of Honey” (1965)
  • 1965 SONG: Louis Armstrong “Hello, Dolly!” (1964)
  • 1965 RECORD: Stan Getz with Joao Gilberto “The Girl from Ipanema” (1964)
  • 1964 RECORD/SONG: Henry Mancini “The Days of Wine and Roses” (1963)
  • 1963 SONG: Sammy Davis, Jr. “What Kind of Fool am I?” (1962)
  • 1963 RECORD: Tony Bennett “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” (1962)
  • 1962 RECORD/SONG: Henry Mancini with Audrey Hepburn “Moon River” (1961)
  • 1961 SONG: Ferrante & Teicher “Theme from ‘Exodus’” (1960)
  • 1961 RECORD: Percy Faith “A Theme from ‘A Summer Place’” (1960)
  • 1960 SONG: Johnny Horton “The Battle of New Orleans” (1959)
  • 1960 RECORD: Bobby Darin “Mack the Knife” (1959)
  • 1959 RECORD/SONG: Domenico Modugno “Volare (Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blue)” (1958)

GRAMMY WINNERS RANKED

This is the DMDB’s ranking of all songs which have won Grammys for Song or Record of the Year.

1. Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You” (1992)
2. The Police “Every Breath You Take” (1983)
3. Simon & Garfunkel “Bridge Over Troubled Water” (1970)
4. Eagles “Hotel California” (1977)
5. Celine Dion “My Heart Will Go On” (1997)
6. Bobby Darin “Mack the Knife” (1959)
7. Adele “Rolling in the Deep” (2010)
8. Mark Ronson with Bruno Mars “Uptown Funk!” (2014)
9. Gotye with Kimbra “Somebody That I Used to Know” (2011)
10. Adele “Hello” (2015)

11. USA for Africa “We Are the World” (1985)
12. Kim Carnes “Bette Davis Eyes” (1981)
13. Michael Jackson “Beat It” (1983)
14. Santana with Rob Thomas “Smooth” (1999)
15. Roberta Flack “Killing Me Softly with His Song” (1973)
16. Debby Boone “You Light Up My Life” (1977)
17. Beyoncé “Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)” (2008)
18. Simon & Garfunkel “Mrs. Robinson” (1968)
19. Coldplay “Viva La Vida” (2008)
20. Barbra Streisand “The Way We Were” (1973)

21. Roberta Flack “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” (1972)
22. Lorde “Royals” (2013)
23. Daft Punk with Pharrell Williams “Get Lucky” (2013)
24. The Fifth Dimension “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” (1969)
25. Alicia Keys “Fallin’” (2001)
26. Ed Sheeran “Thinking Out Loud” (2014)
27. Green Day “Boulevard of Broken Dreams” (2004)
28. Sam Smith “Stay with Me” (2014)
29. U2 “Beautiful Day” (2000)
30. Willie Nelson “Always on My Mind” (1982)

31. Fun with Janelle Monáe “We Are Young” (2012)
32. Tina Turner “What’s Love Got to Do with It” (1984)
33. Johnny Horton “The Battle of New Orleans” (1959)
34. Frank Sinatra “Strangers in the Night” (1966)
35. Seal “Kiss from a Rose” (1994)
36. Henry Mancini with Audrey Hepburn “Moon River” (1961)
37. Lady Antebellum “Need You Now” (2009)
38. Dionne & Friends “That's What Friends Are For” (1985)
39. Phil Collins “Another Day in Paradise” (1989)
40. Eric Clapton “Tears in Heaven” (1992)

41. Billie Eilish “Bad Guy” (2019) 42. Coldplay “Clocks” (2002)
43. Bette Midler “Wind Beneath My Wings” (1989)
44. Captain & Tennille “Love Will Keep Us Together” (1975)
45. Percy Faith “A Theme from ‘A Summer Place’” (1960)
46. Amy Winehouse “Rehab” (2006)
47. Olivia Newton-John “I Honestly Love You” (1974)
48. Billy Joel “Just the Way You Are” (1977)
49. Bruno Mars “That’s What I Like” (2016)
50. Kings of Leon “Use Somebody” (2008)

51. Carole King “It’s Too Late” (1971)
52. Domenico Modugno “Volare (Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blue)” (1958)
53. Bruce Springsteen “Streets of Philadelphia” (1994)
54. Peabo Bryson with Regina Belle “A Whole New World” (1992)
55. Sheryl Crow “All I Wanna Do” (1994)
56. Louis Armstrong “Hello, Dolly!” (1964)
57. Stan Getz with Joao Gilberto “The Girl from Ipanema” (1964)
58. Barbra Streisand “Evergreen (Love Theme from ‘A Star Is Born’)” (1976)
59. Tony Bennett “I Left My Heart in San Francisco” (1962)
60. Eric Clapton “Change the World” (1996)

61. James Taylor “You’ve Got a Friend” (1971)
62. Barry Manilow “I Write the Songs” (1975)
63. Natalie Cole with Nat “King” Cole “Unforgettable” (1991)
64. The Fifth Dimension “Up, Up and Away” (1967)
65. Steve Winwood “Higher Love” (1986)
66. The Doobie Brothers “What a Fool Believes” (1979)
67. The Beatles “Michelle” (1965)
68. Bobby McFerrin “Don’t Worry Be Happy” (1988)
69. Shawn Colvin “Sunny Came Home” (1997)
70. Norah Jones “Don’t Know Why” (2002)

71. Christopher Cross “Sailing” (1980)
72. Childish Gambino “This Is America” (2018)
73. Bruno Mars “24K Magic” (2016)
74. Bette Midler “From a Distance” (1990)
75. Toto “Rosanna” (1982)
76. Henry Mancini “The Days of Wine and Roses” (1963)
77. George Benson “This Masquerade” (1976)
78. Linda Ronstadt with James Ingram “Somewhere Out There” (1986)
79. Dixie Chicks “Not Ready to Make Nice” (2006)
80. Judy Collins “Send in the Clowns” (1975)

81. Sammy Davis, Jr. “What Kind of Fool am I?” (1962)
82. Paul Simon “Graceland” (1986)
83. U2 “Sometimes You Can’t Make It on Your Own” (2005)
84. U2 “Walk On” (2001)
85. Tony Bennett “The Shadow of Your Smile (Love Theme from ‘The Sandpiper’)” (1965)
86. Ferrante & Teicher “Theme from ‘Exodus’” (1960)
87. Joe South “Games People Play” (1968)
88. Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass “A Taste of Honey” (1965)
89. John Mayer “Daughters” (2004)
90. Roger Miller “Little Green Apples” (1968)

91. Carole King “You’ve Got a Friend” (1971)
92. Luther Vandross “Dance with My Father” (2003)
93. Robert Plant with Alison Krauss “Please Read the Letter” (2007)
94. Ray Charles with Norah Jones “Here We Go Again” (2004)


Resources and Related Links:

Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy” won Grammys for Record and Song of the Year

First posted 12/11/2019; updated 3/20/2020.

Bad Guy

Billie Eilish

Writer(s): Billie Eilish O’Connell/Finneas O’Connell (see lyrics here)


Released: March 29, 2019


First Charted: April 13, 2019


Peak: 11 US, 6 A40, 34 AA, 12 MR, 2 UK, 11 CN, 12 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 1.0 US, 1.2 UK, 11.26 world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 819.0 video, 1006.0 streaming

Awards:

Review:

The song most likely to be identified with 2019 for years to come is Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Road.” The song logged a whopping 19 weeks at #1 on the Billboard Hot 100, making it the biggest song in that chart’s history. Of course, all songs must eventually fall and “Old Town Road” finally succumbed to Billie Eilish’s “Bad Guy.” While the song only spent a solitary week atop the chart, it set a record of its own – the longest run at #2 (nine weeks) before sliding into the pinnacle position. SF

At only 17 years old when the song hit its peak, Billie also secured another significant chart accomplishment. Born in 2001, she became the first artist to top the Billboard Hot 100 who was born in the 21st century. Just a few months earlier, in April 2019, she’d become the first artist born in the 21st century to top the Billboard album chart with When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, from which “Bad Guy” was lifted CNN as the fifth single. By year’s end, her youth also secured her another major accomplishment when she became the youngest artist in history to land Grammy nominations in the Big Four categories (Best Album, Best Song, Best Record, and Best New Artist). HP Two of those nominations – Record and Song of the Year – came for “Bad Guy.”

The song – which has been called pop-trap and nu-goth pop – is a minimalist production built on a synth bass and kick drum. WK Billie didn’t have any expectations for it, considering the chorus has no hook. She told Billboard that she and her brother Finneas (who produced her album and co-wrote the song) tried “to write something else over that but we couldn’t do it because nothing else worked.” SF Vanity Fair said the song “treads the line between her slightly deranged aesthetic and a whiff of familiarity that keeps it squarely pop” VF

Lyrically, the song mocks how people – including herself – try to present themselves as rule breakers. SF She sarcastically taunts her lover for being a bad guy, boasting with tongue firmly in cheek that she’s tougher than he is. As she said, “You will never catch a bad bitch telling everyone she’s a bad bitch.” SF The song earned Billie comparisons to Fiona Apple, Lorde, and Amy Winehouse. WK Sam Prance of Pop Buzz called it “the perfect anthem for anyone…who likes to get in touch with their dark side.” PB


Resources and Related Links:

  • Billie Eilish’s DMDB Encyclopedia entry
  • CNN CNN.com (4/10/2019). “This 17-year-old is the first artist born in the 2000s to have a No. 1 album.” By Kendall Trammell.
  • HP Huffpost.com (11/20/2019). “Billie Eilish Becomes Youngest Person Ever Nominated in All 4 Top Grammy Categories” by Kimberley Richards
  • PB PopBuzz.com (4/3/2019). “Billie Eilish sings about seducing your dad in NSFW ‘bad guy’ lyrics.” By Sam Prance.
  • SF Songfacts
  • VF Vanity Fair (7/2/2019). “9 Songs From 2019 That Might Predict the Future of Pop.” By DJ Louie XIV.
  • WK Wikipedia

The Top Songs by Decade, 1900-present

Originally posted 4/9/2012; updated 1/26/2020.

image from musiccanada.files.wordpress.com

Dave’s Music Database has compiled the best songs of all-time into a variety of lists over the years. Check out the full array of DMDB best-of lists here. However, this page – which at nearly 32,000 hits is the most visited on the DMDB blog – offers snapshots of the top 10 songs of each decade from 1900 to present. To see the full top 100 list for a decade, simply click on the badge.


1. Uptown Funk!… Mark Ronson with Bruno Mars (2014)
2. Rolling in the Deep…Adele (2010)
3. Despacito…Luis Fonsi with Daddy Yankee & Justin Bieber (2017)
4. Shape of You…Ed Sheeran (2017)
5. Somebody That I Used to Know…Gotye with Kimbra (2011)
6. Hello…Adele (2015)
7. Happy…Pharrell Williams (2013)
8. Blurred Lines…Robin Thicke with T.I. & Pharrell Williams (2013)
9. See You Again …Wiz Khalifa with Charlie Puth (2015)
10. Closer…The Chainsmokers with Halsey (2016)

1. Hey Ya!...OutKast (2003)
2. Lose Yourself…Eminem (2002)
3. I Gotta Feeling…Black Eyed Peas (2009)
4. Yeah!...Usher with Lil’ Jon & Ludacris (2004)
5. Umbrella…Rihanna with Jay-Z (2007)
6. Crazy…Gnarls Barkley (2006)
7. Crazy in Love… Beyoncé with Jay-Z (2003)
8. We Belong Together…Mariah Carey (2005)
9. Poker Face…Lady Gaga (2009)
10. Low…Flo Rida with T-Pain (2007)

1. I Will Always Love You…Whitney Houston (1992)
2. Smells Like Teen Spirit…Nirvana (1991)
3. Candle in the Wind 1997 (Goodbye England’s Rose)…Elton John (1997)
4. (Everything I Do) I Do It for You…Bryan Adams (1991)
5. My Heart Will Go On…Celine Dion (1997)
6. Nothing Compares 2 U…Sinéad O’Connor (1990)
7. Losing My Religion…R.E.M. (1991)
8. Baby One More Time…Britney Spears (1998)
9. One …U2 (1991)
10. Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix)…Los Del Rio (1995)

1. Billie Jean…Michael Jackson (1982)
2. Every Breath You Take…The Police (1983)
3. Sweet Child O’ Mine…Guns N’ Roses (1987)
4. I Love Rock and Roll…Joan Jett & the Blackhearts (1981)
5. When Doves Cry…Prince (1984)
6. We Are the World…U.S.A. for Africa (1985)
7. Endless Love…Lionel Richie & Diana Ross (1981)
8. Beat It…Michael Jackson (1983)
9. With or Without You…U2 (1987)
10. Bette Davis Eyes…Kim Carnes (1981)

1. Bohemian Rhapsody…Queen (1975)
2. Imagine…John Lennon (1971)
3. Bridge Over Troubled Water…Simon & Garfunkel (1970)
4. Hotel California…Eagles (1976)
5. Stayin’ Alive…Bee Gees (1977)
6. Layla…Derek & the Dominos (1970)
7. Let It Be…The Beatles (1970)
8. American Pie…Don McLean (1971)
9. Stairway to Heaven…Led Zeppelin (1971)
10. Dancing Queen…Abba (1976)

1. Hey Jude…The Beatles (1968)
2. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction…The Rolling Stones (1965)
3. I Heard It Through the Grapevine…Marvin Gaye (1968)
4. Respect…Aretha Franklin (1967)
5. Good Vibrations…The Beach Boys (1966)
6. I Want to Hold Your Hand…The Beatles (1963)
7. Yesterday…The Beatles (1965)
8. (Sittin’ on) The Dock of the Bay…Otis Redding (1968)
9. Like a Rolling Stone…Bob Dylan (1965)
10. (Oh) Pretty Woman…Roy Orbison (1964)

1. We’re Gonna Rock Around the Clock…Bill Haley & His Comets (1954)
2. Heartbreak Hotel…Elvis Presley (1956)
3. Don’t Be Cruel…Elvis Presley (1956)
4. Mack the Knife…Bobby Darin (1959)
5. Hound Dog…Elvis Presley (1956)
6. Jailhouse Rock…Elvis Presley (1957)
7. Johnny B. Goode…Chuck Berry (1958)
8. Tennessee Waltz…Patti Page (1950)
9. What’d I Say…Ray Charles (1959)
10. That’ll Be the Day…Buddy Holly & the Crickets (1957)

1. White Christmas...Bing Crosby with the Ken Darby Singers (1942)
2. Stardust...Artie Shaw (1941)
3. Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer...Gene Autry (1949)
4. As Time Goes By…Dooley Wilson (1942)
5. Sentimental Journey...Les Brown with Doris Day (1945)
6. Body and Soul...Coleman Hawkins (1940)
7. Paper Doll...The Mills Brothers (1943)
8. Peg O’ My Heart...The Harmonicats (1947)
9. When You Wish Upon a Star...Cliff Edwards (1940)
10. Chattanooga Choo Choo...Glenn Miller with Tex Beneke & the Four Modernaires (1941)

1. Over the Rainbow...Judy Garland (1939)
2. Night and Day...Fred Astaire with Leo Reisman (1932)
3. In the Mood...Glenn Miller (1939)
4. Cheek to Cheek...Fred Astaire with Leo Reisman (1935)
5. Begin the Beguine...Artie Shaw (1938)
6. Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)...Ethel Waters (1933)
7. The Way You Look Tonight...Fred Astaire with Johnny Green (1936)
8. All the Things You Are...Tommy Dorsey with Jack Leonard (1939)
9. Pennies from Heaven...Bing Crosby with George Stoll (1936)
10. A-Tisket, A-Tasket...Ella Fitzgerald with Chick Webb (1938)

1. My Blue Heaven...Gene Austin (1927)
2. Swanee...Al Jolson (1920)
3. St. Louis Blues...Bessie Smith with Louis Armstrong (1925)
4. Whispering...Paul Whiteman (1920)
5. April Showers...Al Jolson (1922)
6. Ol’ Man River...Paul Whiteman with Bing Crosby (1928)
7. Ain’t Misbehavin’...Thomas “Fats” Waller (1929)
8. Tea for Two…Marion Harris (1925)
9. It Had to Be You...Isham Jones (1924)
10. Dardanella...Ben Selvin (1920)

1. Alexander’s Ragtime Band...Arthur Collins & Byron Harlan (1911)
2. Over There...American Quartet (1917)
3. Let Me Call You Sweetheart...Peerless Quartet (1911)
4. You Made Me Love You (I Didn't Want to Do It)...Al Jolson (1913)
5. Moonlight Bay...American Quartet (1912)
6. By the Light of the Silvery Moon...Billy Murray with the Haydn Quartet (1910)
7. Till We Meet Again...Henry Burr & Albert Campbell (1919)
8. Rock-a-Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody...Al Jolson (1918)
9. Tiger Rag...Original Dixieland Jazz Band (1918)
10. When Irish Eyes Are Smiling...Chauncey Olcott (1913)

1. You’re a Grand Old Flag (aka “The Grand Old Rag”)…Billy Murray (1906)
2. Sweet Adeline (You’re the Flower of My Heart)…Haydn Quartet (1904)
3. Take Me Out to the Ball Game…Haydn Quartet (1908)
4. Give My Regards to Broadway…Billy Murray (1905)
5. Meet Me in St. Louis Louis…Billy Murray (1904)
6. In the Good Old Summertime…Haydn Quartet (1903)
7. Shine on Harvest Moon…Harry MacDonough with Miss Walton (1909)
8. Bill Bailey Won’t You Please Come Home…Arthur Collins (1902)
9. School Days (When We Were a Couple of Kids)…Byron Harlan (1907)
10. Yankee Doodle Boy…Billy Murray (1905)

Friday, January 24, 2020

Most-Recorded Songs, 1890-1954: Top 100

First posted 1/24/2020.

This list comes from Joel Whitburn’s Pop Memories 1890-1954 (published by Record Research: Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin; 1986), pages 632-33. As it says in the book, “During the pre-rock era, one of the most important indicators of a song’s enduring musical greatness was the number of artists to record it. This list represents the most comprehensive survey ever made of the pre-1955 songs which have been recorded by the most artists (multiple versions by an artist do not count). It encompasses: Edison and Columbia cylinders; all 78s in the extensive collections of the Library of Congress, the New York Public Library, and the Syracuse, Stanford and Yale Uniiversity Libraries; and all new Recordaid listings from the 1950s to the present. Songs written before 1955 but most popular later, such as ‘Misty’ and ‘Autumn Leaves,’ are not included. The year published and the songwriters are shown after the title.”

1. “Silent Night” (1818) by Joseph Muhr and Franz Gruber
2. “St. Louis Blues” (1914) by W.C. Handy
3. “Stardust” (1929) by Hoagy Carmichael and Mitchell Parish
4. “Body and Soul” (1930) by Johnny Green, Ed Heyman, Robert Sauer, and Frank Eyton
5. “Summertime” (1935) by George Gershwin and Dubose Heyward
6. “The Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)” (1851) by Stephen Foster
7. “Tea for Two” (1925) by Vincent Youmans and Irving Caesar
8. “White Christmas” (1942) by Irving Berlin
9. “All the Things You Are” (1939) by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II
10. “Night and Day” (1932) by Cole Porter

11. “Begin the Beguine” (1935) by Cole Porter
12. “Danny Boy” (1913) by Fred Weatherly (adapted from “Londonberry Air”)
13. “Sweet Georgia Brown” (1925) by Maceo Pinkard, Keneth Casey, and Ben Bernie
14. “The Man I Love” (1924) by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin
15. “Over the Rainbow” (1939) by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg
16. “Caravan” (1937) by Duke Ellington, Juan Tizol, and Irving Mills
17. “After You’ve Gone” (1918) by Turner Layton and Harry Creamer
18. “Yesterdays” (1933) by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach
19. “Ain’t Misbehavin’” (1929) by Fats Waller, Harry Brooks, and Andy Razaf
20. “Lover, Come Back to Me” (1928) by Sigmund Romberg and Oscar Hammerstein II

21. “What Is This Thing Called Love?” (1930) by Cole Porter
22. “I Can’t Get Started” (1936) by Vernon Duke and Ira Gershwin
23. “Jingle Bells” (1857) by J.S. Pierpont
24. “I Can’t Give You Anything But Love” (1928) by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields
25. “My Old Kentucky Home” (1853) by Stephen Foster
26. “When the Saints Go Marching In” (1896) by James Black and Katharine Purvis
27. “Tenderly” (1947) by Walter Gross and Jack Lawrence
28. “Blue Skies” (1927) by Irving Berlin
29. “September Song” (1938) by Kurt Weill and Maxwell Anderson
30. “My Blue Heaven” (1927) by Walter Donaldson and George Whiting

31. “Always” (1925) by Irving Berlin
32. “Tiger Rag” (1917) by Harry DeCosta and Original Dixieland Jazz Band
33. “The Rosary” (1898) by Ethelbert Nevins and Robert Cameron Rogers
34. “Home, Sweet Home” (1823) by Henry Bishop and John Howard Payne
35. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (1933) by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach
36. “These Foolish Things Remind Me of You” (1936) by Jack Strachey, Harry Link, and Holt Marvell
37. “Ol’ Man River” (1928) by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II
38. “Limehouse Blues” (1924) by Philip Braham and Douglas Furber
39. “Sheik of Araby” (1923) by Ted Snyder, Harry B. Smith, and Francis Wheeler
40. “Embraceable You” (1930) by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin

41. “My Funny Valentine” (1937) by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
42. “Stormy Weather (Keeps Rainin' All the Time)” (1933) by Harold Arlen and Ted Koehler
43. “Twelfth Street Rag” (1914) by Euday L. Bowman
44. “Blue Moon” (1935) by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
45. “The Battle Hymn of the Republic” (1863) by Julia Ward Howe and William Steffe
46. “My Melancholy Baby” (1913) by Ernie Burnett and George Norton
47. “I Got Rhythm” (1930) by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin
48. “Honeysuckle Rose” (1929) by Fats Waller and Anzy Razaf
49. “Love’s Old Sweet Song” (1884) by G. Clifton Bingham and James Mulloy
50. “The Stars and Stripes Forever” (1896) by John Philip Sousa

51. “Where or When” (1937) by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
52. “Laura” (1945) by David Raskin and Johnny Mercer
53. “Mood Indigo” (1931) by Duke Ellington, Barney Bigard, and Irving Mills
54. “The Christmas Song (Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire)” (1946) by Mel Torme and Robert Wells
55. “Love for Sale” (1930) by Cole Porter
56. “Georgia on My Mind” (1930) by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell
57. “San Antonio Rose” (1938) by Bob Wills
58. “How High the Moon” (1940) by Morgan Lewis and Nancy Hamilton
59. “Someone to Watch Over Me” (1926) by George Gershwin and Ira Gerswhin
60. “I Only Have Eyes for You” (1934) by Harry Warren and Al Dublin

61. “Sweet Sue, Just You” (1928) by Victor Young and Will Harris
62. “The Darktown Strutters’ Ball” (1917) by Shelton Brooks
63. “On the Sunny Side of the Street” (1930) by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields
64. “Silver Threads Among the Gold” (1877) by Hart P. Danks and Eben Rexford
65. “I’m in the Mood for Love” (1935) by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields
66. “Deep Purple” (1933) by Peter DeRose and Mitchell Parish
67. “Sometimes I’m Happy” (1925) by Vincent Youmans and Irving Caesar
68. “I’ve Got You Under My Skin” (1934) by Cole Porter
69. “The Star-Spangled Banner” (1814) by Francis Scott Key
70. “Easy to Love” (1936) by Cole Porter

71. “Avalon” (1921) by B.G. DeSylva, Vincent Rose, and Al Jolson
72. “Willow Weep for Me” (1932) by Ann Ronell
73. “Dinah” (1925) by Harry Akst, Sam Lewis, and Joe Young
74. “Moonglow” (1934) by Will Hudson, Eddie DeLange, and Irving Mills
75. “Auld Lang Syne” (1711) adapted by Robert Burns
76. “Carry Me Back to Old Virginny” (1879) by James A. Bland
77. “Alexander’s Ragtime Band” (1911) by Irving Berlin
78. “Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town” (1934) by J. Fred Coots and Haven Gillespie
79. “Basin Street Blues” (1929) by Spencer Williams
80. “Sweet Lorraine” (1935) by Clifford Burwell and Mitchell Parish

81. “I’ll Remember April” (1942) by Don Raye, Gene DePaul, and Patricia Johnston
82. “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” (1949) by Johnny Marks
83. “Solitude” (1934) by Duke Ellington
84. “Some of These Days” (1910) by Shelton Brooks
85. “Stella by Starlight” (1947) by Victor Young and Ned Washington
86. “Maple Leaf Rag” (1899) by Scott Joplin
87. “Lover” (1933) by Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart
88. “The Way You Look Tonight” (1936) by Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields
89. “Pennies from Heaven” (1936) by Arthur Johnston and John Burke
90. “Dancing in the Dark” (1931) by Howard Dietz and Arthur Schwartz

91. “Indiana” (1917) by James Hanley and Ballad MacDonald
92. “April in Paris” (1932) by Vernon Duke
93. “As Time Goes By” (1931) by Herman Hupfield
94. “Royal Garden Blues” (1923) by Spencer Williams and Clarence Williams
95. “The Very Thought of You” (1934) by Ray Noble
96. “Lover Man” (1942) by Jimmy Davis, Roger Ramirez, and Jimmy Sherman
97. “Round Midnight” (1947) by Thelonious Monk and Cootie Williams
98. “Perdido” (1942) by Juan Tizol, Ervin Drake, and Hans Lengsfelder
99. “All of Me” (1931) by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks
100. “What’s New?” (1939) by Johnny Burke and Robert Haggart


Marion Harris charted with “Tea for Two” (1/24/1925)

Updated 1/25/2020.

Tea for Two

Marion Harris

Writer(s):Vincent Youmans, Irving Caesar (see lyrics here)


First Charted: January 24, 1925


Peak: 13 US, 3 GA (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 1.0 US (sheet music sales)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, -- video, -- streaming

Awards:

Review:

This “charming boy/girl duet” LW was introduced by Louise Groody and John Barker in the Broadway musical comedy No, No, Nanette. JA The score was generally regarded as the best of composer Vincent Youman’s short career. He died from tuberculosis at 48. LW Meanwhile, lyricist Irving Caesar “demonstrates all the hallmarks of Tin Pan Alley craftsmanship, artfully simple and pleasingly full of rhymes and alliterations.” LW He was “the archetypical Tin Pan Alley cigar chomping, wisecracking showman” LW- with more than a 1000 songs to his name upon his death at age 101 in 1996.

The lyrics, which were dashed off in 5 minutes, were intended to be temporary, but were never changed. TY Marion Harris had the first charted version, taking it to #1 in 1925. That same year, the Benson Orchestra of Chicago landed at #5 with their instrumental version while Ben Bernie also had a top ten hit with the song. PM Other charted versions came from the Ipana Troubadours (#15, 1930) and Teddy Wilson (#18, 1937). PM Warren Covington had a million-selling cha-cha version with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (“Tea for Two Cha Cha,” #7, 1958). TY

The song “is one of the most recorded standards of Tin Pan Alley,” JA having been covered by musicians as diverse as Russian classical composer Dmitri Shostakovich, who adapted the tune as “Tahiti Trot” in 1928, LW and jazz pianist Art Tatum (#18, 1939) whose instrumental version is “a masterclass in piano virtuosity.” LW Jazz musicians have particularly responded to the song because “the complex harmonic construction of the melody gives great scope for improvisation.” LW

Tatum had played the song for years, even predating his initial 1933 recording of it at his debut solo recording session. Fellow musician Fats Waller once stopped in the middle of playing at New York Club when Art Tatum entered and announced, “I play piano, but God is in the house tonight!” SS


Resources and Related Links:

  • Marion Harris’ DMDB Encyclopedia entry
  • Fats Waller’s DMDB Encyclopedia entry
  • Irving Caesar’s DMDB Encyclopedia entry
  • JA David A. Jasen (2002). A Century of American Popular Music: 2000 Best-Loved and Rememberd Songs (1899-1999). Routledge: Taylor & Francis, Inc. Page 189.
  • LW Alan Lewens (2001). Popular Song – Soundtrack of the Century. Billboard Books: New York, NY. Page 50.
  • PM Record Research’s Pop Memories 1890-1954 (1986). By Joel Whitburn. Menomonee Falls, WI; Record Research, Inc. Page 590.
  • SS Steve Sullivan (2013). Encyclopedia of Great Popular Song Recordings (Volume I). Scarecrow Press: Lanham, Maryland. Page 598.
  • TY Don Tyler (1985). Hit Parade 1920-1955. New York, NY: Quill. Page 132.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Dave's Music Database: Song Inductees (January 2020)

Originally posted 1/22/2020.

In honor of the 10th anniversary of the DMDB blog on January 22, 2019, Dave’s Music Database launched its own Hall of Fame. This is the fifth set of song inductees. These are the ten most-recorded songs from 1890-1954, according to Pop Memories. See full list here. While the list is not focused on a specific act for each song, the inductees are the highest-rated versions of the song in Dave’s Music Database. Not listed here is previous inductee “White Christmas” by Bing Crosby. Note: click on song title for the full blog entry and key for the footnote codes.

Fred Astaire “Night and Day” (1932)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

When it comes to standards, this song, which has been called “one of the greatest love ballads ever written,” NPR stands second only to “Star Dust.” MM Cole Porter, whose name is “almost a generic term for witty show songs,” LW wrote it for the Broadway musical Gay Divorce. After Fred Astaire performed it for the show and film, his recording became the first and most successful of seven charting versions between 1932 and 1946. PM

Bing Crosby “Silent Night” (1935)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

Father Joseph Mohr wrote a poem called “Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht” and his friend Franz Gruber worked it up for guitar SF for performance at the 1818 Christmas Eve service. Since then, it has been translated into more than 44 languages, WK and became the most recorded song of the first half of the 20th century. PM The best known version is the 1935 recording by Bing Crosby with sales estimated as high as 30 million. PM

Tommy Dorsey “All the Things You Are” (1939)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

The Broadway musical comedy Very Warm for May was the last hurrah for famed composer Jerome Kern. Sadly, it was a commercial failure, closing after only 59 performances. SB However, “All the Things You Are” from the show became a #1 hit for Tommy Dorsey and was followed by two more charted version in 1940. In a 1964 Saturday Review poll, more composers named the song as their favorite than any other. TY

Marion Harris “Tea for Two” (1925)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

This was introduced by Louise Groody and John Barker in the Broadway musical comedy No, No, Nanette. JA Marion Harris had the first charted version, taking it to #1 in 1925. It “is one of the most recorded standards of Tin Pan Alley,” JA having been covered by musicians as diverse as Russian classical composer Dmitri Shostakovich and jazz pianist Art Tatum (#18, 1939).

Coleman Hawkins “Body and Soul” (1940)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

“Body and Soul” is “an all-time classic torch song” SF and “the most recorded jazz standard.” WK Multiple versions were recorded, but it was an instrumental version by Coleman Hawkins, who has been called “the father of the tenor saxophone,” NPR’09 which ranks highest. He showed “it was possible to modernize well-worn Tin Pan Alley standards” NPR and it “became one of the most important jazz recordings of all time.” JA

Billie Holiday “Summertime” (1936)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

It has been widely reported and accepted for years that the Beatles’ “Yesterday” is the most recorded song of all time, but its four thousand or so recordings pale compared to the 67,000 of “Summertime,” GW written originally for folk opera Porgy and Bess. The only version to chart in the pre-rock era was Billie Holiday’s 1936 recording (#12). Broadway composer Stephen Sondheim called the lyrics for this and “My Man’s Gone Now” “the best lyrics in the musical theater.” WM

Vess Ossman “The Old Folks at Home (Swanee River)” (1900)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

Stephen Foster wrote and published this minstrel song (also known as “Swanee River”) in 1851. It was the most popular song ever published at that time WM with sheet music sales estimated as high as 20 million. PM Nine versions charted between 1892 and 1937, with Len Spencer being first (#1, 1892). Vess Ossman, however, had the highest-ranked version with his #2 banjo instrumental take on the song. It became Florida’s state song in 1935.

Artie Shaw “Stardust” (1941)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

Hoagy Carmichael’s first major songwriting success NRR was first written as “an up-tempo dance instrumental” NPR but Mitchell Parish added lyrics in 1929. Isham Jones took it to #1 in 1931, but Artie Shaw’s version was rated the favorite record of all time in a 1956 Billboad poll of disc jockeys. PM It has been recorded more than 2000 times LW in more than forty languages. RCG

Bessie Smith & Louis Armstrong “St. Louis Blues” (1925)

Inducted January 2020 as “Top 10 Most-Recorded Songs from 1890-1954.”

This has been called “the most important blues song ever written.” LW William Christopher Handy, who became known as “The Father of the Blues,” wrote it in 1914 after hearing a St. Louis woman complaining about her cheating husband. LW 15 versions charted over the next forty years. PM Marion Harris had the greatest success with it in 1920 (#1), PM but Bessie Smith’s version with Louis Armstrong is the highest ranked version.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Rush: Top 100 Songs / All the Albums Ranked

First posted 7/29/2012; updated 1/21/2020.

Rush

l to r: Alex Lifeson, Neil Peart, and Geddy Lee of Rush

This page includes the top 100 Rush songs and a ranking of all of Rush’s studio albums, as well as significant live releases and compilations. You can also check out the following:

Awards:


Top 100 Songs


Dave’s Music Database lists are determined by song’s appearances on best-of lists as well as chart success, sales, radio airplay, streaming, and awards. Songs which hit #1 on various charts are noted. (Click for codes to singles charts.)

DMDB Top 5%:

1. Tom Sawyer (1981)
2. The Spirit of Radio (1980)

DMDB Top 10%:

3. Closer to the Heart (1977)
4. Limelight (1981)
5. New World Man (1982) #1 AR, CN

DMDB Top 20%:

6. Fly by Night (1975)
7. Subdivisions (1982)
8. The Big Money (1985)
9. The Temples of Syrinx (Part II of “2112”) (1976)
10. Free Will (1980)
11. Time Stand Still (1987)
12. The Trees (1978)
13. Red Barchetta (1981)

DMDB Top 20%:

14. Working Man (1974)
15. Overture (Part I of “2112”) (1976)
16. Presentation (Part IV of “2112”) (1976)
17. Distant Early Warning (1984)
18. Discovery (Part III of “2112”) (1976)
19. In the End (1975)
20. Roll the Bones (1991)

21. The Body Electric (1984)
22. Grand Finale (Part VII of “2112”) (1976)
23. A Passage to Bangkok (1976)
24. Force Ten (1987)
25. Nobody’s Hero (1993)
26. Dreamline (1991) #1 AR
27. Xanadu (1977)
28. Soliloquy (Part VI of “2112”) (1976)
29. Finding My Way (1974)
30. Oracle: The Dream (Part V of “2112”) (1976)

31. Lock and Key (1987)
32. Driven (1996)
33. Show Don’t Tell (1989) #1 AR
34. Bravado (1991)
35. Manhattan Project (1985)
36. One Little Victory (2002)
37. Stick It Out (1993) #1 AR
38. Mystic Rhythms (1985)
39. Far Cry (2007)
40. Entre Nous (1980)

41. Vital Signs (1981)
42. Secret Touch (2002)
43. Red Sector A (1984)
44. Test for Echo (1996) #1 AR
45. By-Tor and the Snow Dog (1975)
46. Lakeside Park (1975)
47. Marathon (1985)
48. In the Mood (1974)
49. YYZ (1981)
50. Ghost of a Chance (1991)

51. Territories (1985)
52. Prime Mover (1987)
53. Animate (1993)
54. La Villa Strangiato (1978)
55. Something for Nothing (1976)
56. Half the World (1996)
57. The Analog Kid (1982)
58. The Pass (1989)
59. Mission (1987)
60. What You’re Doing (1974)

61. Presto (1989)
62. Cold Fire (1993)
63. Between the Wheels (1984)
64. Bastille Day (1975)
65. Resist (1996)
66. Countdown (1982)
67. Superconductor (1989)
68. Headlong Flight (2012)
69. The Wreckers (2012)
70. Circumstances (1978)

71. Cygnus X-1 Book Two (1978)
72. Different Strings (1980)
73. The Twilight Zone (1976)
74. Workin’ Them Angels (2007)
75. Caravan (2010)
76. Anthem (1975)
77. I Think I’m Going Bald (1975)
78. BU2B (2010)
79. Losing It (1982)
80. Not Fade Away (1973)

81. The Weapon (1982)
82. Second Nature (1987)
83. Natural Science (1980)
84. Leave That Thing Alone (1993)
85. Cinderella Man (1977)
86. The Anarchist (2012)
87. Clockwork Angels (2012)
88. Cygnus X-1 (1977)
89. Witch Hunt (1981)
90. A Farewell to Kings (1977)

91. Return of the Prince (1975)
92. Afterimage (1984)
93. Jacob’s Ladder (1980)
94. The Camera Eye (1981)
95. The Garden (2012)
96. The Larger Bowl (2007)
97. Spindrift (2007)
98. Earthshine (2002)
99. Beneath, Between, and Behind (1975)
100. Broon’s Bane (live, 1981)


Rush Albums Ranked


Dave’s Music Database lists are determined by albums’ appearances on best-of lists as well as chart success, sales, points in the Dave’s Music Database of songs, and awards. This is a ranking of all the studio albums, compilations, and live albums released by Rush from 1974 to 2015.

DMDB Top 1000 Albums:

1. Moving Pictures (1981)
2. 2112 (1976)

DMDB Top 1000 Albums:

3. Permanent Waves (1980)
4. Hemispheres (1978)
5. The Spirit of Radio: Greatest Hits (compilation: 1974-1987, released 2003)
6. A Farewell to Kings (1977)
7. Chronicles (compilation: 1974-1989, released 1990)
8. Exit…Stage Left (live, 1981)
9. Retrospective I (compilation: 1974-1980, released 1997)
10. Archives (box of first three albums: 1974-75, released 1978)

11. Rush (1974)
12. Signals (1982)
13. Retrospective II (compilation: 1981-1987, released 1997)
14. In Rio (live, 2003)
15. Retrospective III (compilation: 1989-2007, released 2009)
16. Snakes & Arrows (2007)
17. Icon (compilation: 1976-1988; released 2010)
18. Grace Under Pressure (1984)
19. Time Stand Still: The Collection (compilation: 1974-1987; released 2010)
20. Power Windows (1985)

21. All the World’s a Stage (live, 1976)
22. Hold Your Fire (1987)
23. Fly by Night (1975)
24. Clockwork Angels (2012)
25. Counterparts (1993)
26. Roll the Bones (1991)
27. Feedback (covers EP, 2004)
28. Different Stages (live box set: 1978-97, released 1998)
29. Caress of Steel (1975)
30. Presto (1989)

31. Snakes & Arrows Live (live, 2007)
32. Grace Under Pressure Tour (live: 1984, released 2009)
33. Working Men (live compilation: 2002-08, released 2009)
34. Test for Echo (1996)
35. Vapor Trails (2002)
36. A Show of Hands (live, 1989)
37. Time Machine (live, 2011)
38. Icon 2 (live: 1974-88, released 2011)
39. Clockwork Angels Tour (live, 2013)
40. R40 Live (live, 2015)