Saturday, December 12, 2015

Frank Sinatra's Top 100 Songs

image from breitbart.com

December 12, 2015 would have been Frank Sinatra’s 100th birthday. In honor of the event, here are his top 100 songs, according to Dave’s Music Database. This list was created by using sales and airplay figures along with chart performance, number of appearances on Sinatra albums, appearances on best-of-Sinatra lists, and best-songs-of-all-time-lists as compiled by Dave’s Music Database.

Note: Sinatra recorded new versions of many of his songs over the years. In such cases, the earliest version is listed.

1. I’ll Never Smile Again (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra & the Pied Pipers, 1940)
2. Strangers in the Night (1966)
3. All or Nothing at All (with Harry James’ Orchestra, 1939)
4. My Way (1969)
5. One for My Baby and One for the Road (1949)
6. Night and Day (with Axel Stordahl’s Orchestra, 1942)
7. You’ll Never Walk Alone (with the Ken Lane Singers, 1945)
8. There Are Such Things (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra & the Pied Pipers (1942)
9. Theme from ‘New York, New York’ (1980)
10. I’ve Got You Under My Skin (1956)

11. Young at Heart (1954)
12. Five Minutes More (1946)
13. Saturday Night Is the Lonelest Night of the Week (1944)
14. I Get a Kick Out of You (1953)
15. Star Dust (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra & the Pied Pipers, 1940)
16. Somethin’ Stupid (with Nancy Sinatra, 1967)
17. White Christmas (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1949)
18. Witchcraft (1957)
19. All the Way (1957)
20. It Was a Very Good Year (1965)

21. They Say It’s Wonderful (1946)
22. Learnin’ the Blues (1955)
23. Love and Marriage (1955)
24. I’ve Got a Crush on You (with Bobby Hackett, 1948)
25. Almost Like Being in Love (1947)
26. Autumn in New York (1949)
27. Come Fly with Me (1958)
28. I’ve Got the World on a String (1953)
29. Nancy with the Laughing Face (1945)
30. Summer Wind (1966)

31. Oh! What It Seemed to Be (1946)
32. I’ll Be Seeing You (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1940)
33. Fly Me to the Moon (1964)
34. September Song (1946)
35. Time after Time (1947)
36. Oh Look at Me Now (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, Connie Haines, & the Pied Pipers, 1941)
37. That’s Life (1966)
38. How About You? (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1942)
39. But Beautiful (1948)
40. High Hopes (with A Bunch O Kids, 1959)

41. In the Blue of the Evening (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1942)
42. My Funny Valentine (1954)
43. Nice ‘N’ Easy (1960)
44. Three Coins in the Fountain (1954)
45. In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning (1955)
46. I Couldn’t Sleep a Wink Last Night (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1944)
47. Call Me Irresponsible (1963)
48. Love Is the Tender Trap (1955)
49. The Lady Is a Tramp (1957)
50. Some Enchanted Evening (1949)

51. All of Me (1948)
52. The Way You Look Tonight (1964)
53. Luck Be a Lady (1965)
54. Mam’selle (1947)
55. Begin the Beguine (1946)
56. Here’s That Rainy Day (1959)
57. Fools Rush in Where Angels Fear to Tread (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1940)
58. Chicago (That Toddlin’ Town) (1957)
59. Polka Dots and Moonbeams (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1940)
60. The Coffee Song (1946)

61. Everything Happens to Me (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1941)
62. Dream (When You’re Feeling Blue) (1945)
63. This Love of Mine (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra & the Pied Pipers, 1941)
64. Day by Day (1946)
65. The House I Live In (1945)
66. A Lovely Way to Spend an Evening (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1944)
67. Goodnight Irene (with the Mitch Miller Singers, 1950)
68. People Will Say We’re in Love (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1943)
69. You’ll Never Know (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1943)
70. The Second Time Around (1961)

71. Blues in the Night (My Mama Done Tol’ Me) (1958)
72. Softly, As I Leave You (1964)
73. I’m a Fool to Want You (1951)
74. Imagination (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1940)
75. Put Your Dreams Away for Another Day (1945)
76. The Birth of the Blues (1952)
77. Oh, What a Beautiful Morning (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1943)
78. My Kind of Lady (1964)
79. How Little It Matters How Little We Know (1956)
80. Nature Boy (with the Jeff Alexander Choir, 1948)

81. South of the Border (Down Mexico Way) (1953)
82. Nevertheless I’m in Love with You (1950)
83. It Only Happens When I Dance with You (1948)
84. What’ll I Do? (1948)
85. If I Loved You (1945)
86. It Started All Over Again (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1943)
87. Angel Eyes (1958)
88. You Make Me Feel So Young (with Count Basie, 1956)
89. I Fall in Love Too Easily (1945)
90. From Here to Eternity (1953)

91. Hey! Jealous Lover (1956)
92. Cycles (1968)
93. Dolores (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra & the Pied Pipers, 1941)
94. The Song Is You (with Axel Stordahl’s Orchestra, 1942)
95. It Had to Be You (1980)
96. Sunday, Monday or Always (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1943)
97. Be Careful, It’s My Heart (with Tommy Dorsey’s Orchestra, 1942)
98. The World We Know (Over and Over) (1967)
99. Close to You (with the Bobby Tucker Singers, 1943)
100. I’m Walking Behind You (1953)


Thursday, December 3, 2015

Scott Weiland: His 20 Top Songs

image from relix.com

Scott Weiland, best known as the lead singer of Stone Temple Pilots and the supergroup Velvet Revolver, died from a drug overdose on 12/3/2015 while on tour in Bloomington, Minnesota. He was 48. In honor of Weiland, here are his top 20 songs according to Dave’s Music Database, which compiles sales, chart performance, radio airplay, and best-of lists.

1. Stone Temple Pilots “Plush” (1992)
2. Stone Temple Pilots “Interstate Love Song” (1994)
3. Velvet Revolver “Fall to Pieces” (2004)
4. Stone Temple Pilots “Vasoline” (1994)
5. Stone Temple Pilots “Big Empty” (1994)
6. Velvet Revolver “Slither” (2004)
7. Stone Temple Pilots “Big Bang Baby” (1996)
8. Stone Temple Pilots “Creep” (1992)
9. Stone Temple Pilots “Trippin’ ona Hole in a Paper Heart” (1996)
10. Stone Temple Pilots “Sour Girl” (1999)

11. Stone Temple Pilots “Dancing Days” (1995)
12. Stone Temple Pilots “Sex Type Thing” (1992)
13. Stone Temple Pilots “Lady Picture Show” (1996)
14. Stone Temple Pilots “Pretty Penny” (1994)
15. Stone Temple Pilots “Wicked Garden” (1992)
16. Velvet Revolver “The Last Fight” (2007)
17. Stone Temple Pilots “Between the Lines” (2010)
18. Stone Temple Pilots “Revolution” (2001)
19. Stone Temple Pilots “Unglued” (1994)
20. Magnificent Bastards “Mockingbird Girl” (1995)


Saturday, November 14, 2015

Adele’s “Hello” debuts at #1

image from billboard.com


Adele “Hello”


Writer(s): Adele Adkins, Greg Kurstin (see lyrics here)

Released: 10/23/2015, First charted: 11/7/2015

Peak: 110 US, 116 AC, 10a RB, 13 UK (Click for codes to singles charts.)

Sales (in millions): 7.0 US, 1.8 UK, 13.45 world (includes US and UK)

Video Airplay (in millions): 2086.43 Streaming (in millions): 776.0


Review: Adele’s second album, 21, made her a superstar – and set the expectations high for her new album, 25. She introduced new material via a commercial in the United Kingdom on The X Factor on October 18, 2015. Vanity Fair’s Josh Duboff said “the internet collectively lost its mind” after the thirty-second broadcast of “Hello.” WK The single was released five days later. It debuted at #1 in 20 countries, including the United States’ Billboard Hot 100 where it stayed for 10 weeks. It was her fourth #1 in the United States and her second in the U.K. It became the first song to sell more than a million digital copies in a week WK and set a record for 7.32 million streams in its first week. WK

The video also set a record with more than 27.7 million views in a 24-hour span, beating the previous record of 20.1 million views by Taylor Swift’s “Bad Blood.” WK It set the Vevo record for the fastest video to reach 100 million views in five days. WK The video also became the quickest to reach one billion views on YouTube – 88 days. WK MTV named it Video of the Year at its 2016 Video Music Awards. WK

The song won Grammys for Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Pop Solo Performance. 25 won for Album of the Year and Pop Vocal Album, giving Adele five Grammys for the night. She became the first artist in history to win the three general field awards in the same ceremony twice. WK

The “piano ballad with soul influences” WK was marked by lyrics focused on “themes of nostalgia and regret and plays out like a conversation.” WK The song took six months to write – her co-writer, Greg Kurstin, said he wondered “if Adele was ever going to come back and finish it.” WK Kurstin ended up playing bass, guitar, drums, piano, and keyboards on the song. WK The result was what The Guardian’s Alex Petridis described as “precisely the kind of lovelorn epic ballad that made Adele one of the biggest stars in the world.” WK


Resources and Related Links:

Note: Footnotes (raised letter codes) refer to sources frequently cited on the blog. Numbers following the letter code indicate page numbers. If the raised letter code is a link, it will go directly to the correct page instead of the home page of a website. You can find the sources and corresponding footnotes on the “Lists” page in the “Song Resources” section.


Award(s):


Friday, November 13, 2015

November 13, 1965: The Sound of Music soundtrack hit #1

First posted 11/13/2011. Last updated September 4, 2018.

The Sound of Music (cast/soundtrack)

Richard Rodgers/Oscar Hammerstein II (composers)

Opened on Broadway: Nov. 16, 1959

Cast Album Charted: Dec. 21, 1959

Soundtrack Released: March 20, 1965


Sales (in millions):
US: 2.5 c, 15.0 s
UK: -- c, 2.44 s
IFPI: --
World (estimated): 2.5 c, 22.0 s


Peak:
US: 116-C, 12-S
UK: 170-S
Canada: --
Australia: 176-S

Quotable: --


Genre: show tunes


Album Tracks - Cast Album:

  1. Preludium
  2. The Sound of Music (12/28/59, Patti Page #90)
  3. Maria
  4. My Favorite Things (12/14/68, Herb Alpert #45)
  5. Do-Re-Mi (12/14/59, Mitch Miller #70; 12/28/59, Anita Bryant #94)
  6. Sixteen Going on Seventeen
  7. The Lonely Goatherd
  8. How Can Love Survive?
  9. The Sound of Music (Reprise)
  10. Laendler
  11. So Long, Farewell
  12. Climb Ev’ry Mountain (12/21/59, Tony Bennett #74; 5/25/68, Hestations #90)
  13. No Way to Stop It
  14. An Ordinary Couple
  15. Processional
  16. Sixteen Going on Seventeen (Reprise)
  17. Edelweiss
  18. Climb Ev’ry Mountain (Reprise)

* Often multiple versions of a single song from a Broadway show would become hits. None of the versions above are actually on the cast album or soundtrack. All chart positions are from the U.S. Billboard pop charts.


Album Tracks - Soundtrack:

  1. Prelude/The Sound of Music
  2. Overture/Preludium (Dixet Dominus)
  3. Morning Hymn/Alleluia
  4. Maria
  5. I Have Confidence
  6. Sixteen Going on Seventeen
  7. My Favorite Things
  8. Do-Re-Mi
  9. The Sound of Music
  10. The Lonely Goatherd
  11. So Long, Farewell
  12. Climb Ev’ry Mountain
  13. Something Good
  14. Processional/Maria
  15. Edelweiss
  16. Climb Ev’ry Mountain (Reprise)

Click here for the chart codes for singles/hit songs.

Review:

The cast album for The Sound of Music went to #1 for 16 weeks in the U.S. in 1959. Six years later, the soundtrack spent two weeks at #1 in the U.S., but topped the U.K. charts for an astounding 70 weeks. The soundtrack has been estimated at worldwide sales of 22 million which makes it one of the top 100 best sellers of all time. It sparked standards such as the title song, Climb Ev’ry Mountain, and Do-Re-Mi.

The Sound of Music was the final work for the famous musical theater team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II. The pair previously worked on iconic musicals like South Pacific and The King and I. Like those, this was “set in a foreign locale, it starred a female lead in charge of children, it concerned an unlikely romance between an older man and a younger woman, it had a social/political element, and it featured a stirring anthem for a soprano (in this case, ‘Climb Ev’ry Mountain’). The ‘based on a true story’ plot concerned an aspiring nun who becomes a governess in pre-World War II Austria” WR-C for “a wealthy naval captain with seven children,” WR-S “only to marry the children’s father and flee with the family from the Nazis.” WR-C

The film opened in March 1965 and “became the highest grossing movie in history up to that time, and went on to win the Academy Award for best picture. WR-S While the musical starred Mary Martin, the movie version went with Julie Andrews, who had starred in the musical My Fair Lady and was fresh from an Academy Award for her title role in Mary Poppins, another story about a children’s nanny. She “proved to be superb in the film as well as on the soundtrack album.” WR-S


Review Sources/Related DMDB Links:

Awards:


Related DMDB Link(s):


Saturday, October 10, 2015

Billboard – All Time Hot 100 Artists

Last updated 10/10/2015.

image from billboard.com

For the 50th anniversary of the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in 2008, the magazine released a list of the All-Time Hot 100 Artists. They updated the list in 2016 to include all songs which had charted from the inception of the Hot 100 chart on August 4, 1958 through October 10, 2015.

1. The Beatles
2. Madonna
3. Elton John
4. Elvis Presley
5. Mariah Carey
6. Stevie Wonder
7. Janet Jackson
8. Michael Jackson
9. Whitney Houston
10. The Rolling Stones

11. Paul McCartney
12. The Bee Gees
13. Rihanna
14. Usher
15. Chicago
16. The Supremes
17. Daryl Hall & John Oates
18. Prince
19. Rod Stewart
20. Olivia Newton-John

21. Aretha Franklin
22. Marvin Gaye
23. Phil Collins
24. Katy Perry
25. Billy Joel
26. Diana Ross
27. The Four Seasons
28. The Temptations
29. Donna Summer
30. The Beach Boys

31. Lionel Richie
32. Neil Diamond
33. Carpenters
34. Taylor Swift
35. Boyz II Men
36. The Jackson 5/The Jacksons
37. Connie Francis
38. Kenny Rogers
39. Beyoncé
40. Brenda Lee

41. Barbra Streisand
42. Bryan Adams
43. Cher
44. Maroon 5
45. George Michael
46. Black Eyed Peas
47. Bobby Vinton
48. John Mellencamp
49. Three Dog Night
50. Huey Lewis & the News
51. Gloria Estefan/Miami Sound Machine
52. Bon Jovi
53. Pink
54. Chubby Checker
55. Ray Charles
56. Foreigner
57. Kool & the Gang
58. Ricky Nelson
59. Duran Duran
60. The Commodores

61. Bruno Mars
62. Eagles
63. TLC
64. Paul Anka
65. Barry Manilow
66. Dionne Warwick
67. Chris Brown
68. Lady Gaga
69. Gladys Knight & the Pips
70. Heart

71. Nelly
72. The Everly Brothers
73. Bobby Darin
74. R. Kelly
75. James Brown
76. Paula Abdul 77. Alicia Keys
78. Linda Ronstadt
79. Kelly Clarkson
80. Richard Marx

81. Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship
82. Destiny’s Child
83. Celine Dion
84. The Miracles
85. Eminem
86. Jay-Z
87. Bob Seger
88. Fleetwood Mac
89. Kanye West
90. Justin Timberlake

91. Neil Sedaka
92. Bruce Springsteen
93. The Pointer Sisters
94. John Denver
95. The Four Tops
96. Tony Orlando & Dawn
97.
50 Cent
98. 5th Dimension
99. Captain & Tennille
100. Andy Gibb


Resources:

Monday, September 28, 2015

In Concert: Mark Knopfler

image from diffen.com

Venue: Midland Theater; Kansas City, MO
The Players: Mark Knopfler (vocals, guitar), Guy Fletcher (keyboards), Richard Bennett (guitar), Glenn Worf (bass), Jim Cox (piano, organ, accordion), Ian Thomas (drums), John McCusker (violin, Cittern), Michael McGoldrick (whistles, uilleann pipes), Nigel Hitchcock (saxophone)
Opening Act: none

The Set List:

1. Broken Bones 25
2. Corned Beef City 24
3. Privateering 24
4. Father and Son 6
5. Hill Farmer’s Blues 19
6. Skydiver 25
7. She’s Gone 16
8. Your Latest Trick 8
9. Romeo and Juliet 3
10. Sultans of Swing 1
11. Haul Away 24
12. Postcards from Paraguay 20
13. Marbletown 19
14. Speedway at Nazareth 17
15. Telegraph Road 4

Encore:

16. So Far Away 8
17. Going Home (Theme from Local Hero) 5

Album Discography:

1 Dire Straits (with Dire Straits, 1978)
2 Communiqué (with Dire Straits, 1979)
3 Making Movies (with Dire Straits, 1980)
4 Love Over Gold (with Dire Straits, 1982)
5 Local Hero (soundtrack, 1983)
6 Cal (soundtrack, 1984)
7 Comfort and Joy (soundtrack,1984 )
8 Brothers in Arms (with Dire Straits, 1985)
9 The Princess Bride (soundtrack, 1987)
10 Last Exit to Brooklyn (soundtrack, 1989)
11 Missing…Presumed Having a Good Time (with the Notting Hillbillies, 1990)
12 Neck and Neck (with Chet Atkins, 1990)
13 On Every Street (with Dire Straits, 1991)
14 Golden Heart (1996)
15 Wag the Dog (soundtrack, 1998)
16 Metroland (soundtrack, 1999)
17 Sailing to Philadelphia (2000)
18 A Shot at Glory (soundtrack, 2002)
19 The Ragpicker’s Dream (2002)
20 Shangri-La (2004)
21 All the Roadrunning (with Emmylou Harris, 2006)
22 Kill to Get Crimson (2007)
23 Get Lucky (2009)
24 Privateering (2012)
25 Tracker (2015)


Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Sept. 22-23, 1965: Junior Wells recorded his Hoodoo Man Blues album

First posted November 13, 2008. Last updated September 10, 2018.

Hoodoo Man Blues

Junior Wells

Recorded: September 22-23, 1965

Released: November 1965


Sales (in millions):
US: --
UK: --
IFPI: --
World (estimated): --


Peak:
US: --
UK: --
Canada: --
Australia: --

Quotable: “One of the truly classic blues albums of the 1960s” – Bill Dahl, All Music Guide


Genre: blues


Album Tracks:

  1. Snatch It Back and Hold It
  2. Ships on the Ocean
  3. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl
  4. Hound Dog
  5. In the Wee Small Hours of the Morning
  6. Hey Lawdy Mama
  7. Hoodoo Man Blues
  8. Early in the Morning
  9. We’re Ready
  10. You Don’t Love Me Baby
  11. Chitlin Con Carne
  12. Yonders Wall

Singles/Hit Songs:

Click here for the chart codes for singles/hit songs.

Review:

Junior Wells debut album, Hoodoo Man Blues, is “one of the truly classic blues albums of the 1960s, and one of the first to fully document the smoky ambience of a night at a West side nightspot in the superior acoustics of a recording studio.” BD

Bob Koester, the founder of Delmark Records, “liked Wells’ music enough to give the musician considerable freedom on the album in spite of concerns of commercial response.” WK “Wells was given the liberty to select his own…track list, without the usual limitation of songs two or three minutes long.” WK The result was Delmark’s best-selling album. WK

Wells was also allowed to select his own sidemen. WK The blues singer and harmonica player tapped “his usual cohorts,” BD including Jack Myers on bass and Billy Warren on drums. BD Guitarist Buddy Guy also appears, although he was originally billed only as “Friendly Chap” due to Koester’s incorrect assumption that Guy was contractually tied to Chess Records. WK

In 1993, Wells told the Chicago Tribune that the title cut nearly didn’t make the album. He’d recorded it as a single, but when presented to radio “for possible rotation they had rejected it violently, throwing it on the floor and stomping on it.” WK

The album established the blues singer and harmonica player’s career and is acclaimed “as being among the best albums Wells ever produced and even among the greatest blues albums ever made.” WK


Review Source(s):

Awards:


Related DMDB Link(s):


Sunday, August 23, 2015

Max Martin: Top 40 Songs

image from tv.aftonbladet.se

More than any other individual, Max Martin may be responsible for the sound of pop music in the 21st century. As a producer and songwriter, he made a name for himself in the late ‘90s as the man behind hits by Britney Spears, Backstreet Boys, and N Sync. He went on to helm songs by Kelly Clarkson, Katy Perry, Pink, and Taylor Swift. He has co-written 21 #1 songs (noted below) on the Billboard Hot 100, putting him third behind Paul McCartney (32) and John Lennon (26). He’s been behind 54 top-ten hits, putting him ahead of Madonna, Elvis Presley, and The Beatles. He has produced 19 #1 hits, putting him second only to George Martin (23).

So, in celebration of Martin’s accomplisments, here are his top songs of all time according to Dave’s Music Database:

  1. Britney Spears…Baby One More Time (1998) #1
  2. Katy Perry…Roar (2013) #1
  3. Katy Perry with Juicy J…Dark Horse (2013) #1
  4. Taylor Swift…Shake It Off (2014) #1
  5. Katy Perry…I Kissed a Girl (2008) #1
  6. Taylor Swift…Blank Space (2014) #1
  7. Katy Perry with Snoop Dogg…California Gurls (2010) #1
  8. Taylor Swift…We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together (2012) #1
  9. Kelly Clarkson…Since U Been Gone (2004)
  10. Katy Perry…Hot N Cold (2008)

  11. Maroon 5…One More Night (2012) #1
  12. Backstreet Boys…I Want It That Way (1999)
  13. Taio Cruz…Dymamite (2010)
  14. Katy Perry with Kanye West…E.T. (2011) #1
  15. Pink…So What (2008) #1
  16. Taylor Swift…I Knew You Were Trouble (2012)
  17. Katy Perry….Teenage Dream (2010) #1
  18. Ariana Grande with Izzy Azalea…Problem (2014)
  19. Britney Spears…Oops! I Did It Again (2000)
  20. Ellie Goulding…Love Me Like You Do (2015)

  21. Usher with Pitbull…DJ Got Us Falling in Love (2010)
  22. Katy Perry…Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) (2010) #1
  23. Katy Perry…Wide Awake (2012)
  24. Pink…Raise Your Glass (2010) #1
  25. Taylor Swift…Bad Blood (2015) #1
  26. Kelly Clarkson…My Life Would Suck Without You (2009) #1
  27. Katy Perry…The One That Got Away (2011)
  28. Jessie J with Ariana Grande & Nicki Minaj…Bang Bang (2014)
  29. Jessie J…Domino (2011)
  30. Pink…Fuckin’ Perfect (2010)

  31. Taylor Swift…22 (2013)
  32. Katy Perry…Part of Me (2012) #1
  33. Pink…Who Knew (2006)
  34. Kelly Clarkson…Behind These Hazel Eyes (2005)
  35. Britney Spears with Nicki Minaj & Ke$ha…Till the World Ends (2011)
  36. Taylor Swift…Style (2015)
  37. The Weeknd…Can’t Feel My Face (2015) #1
  38. Avril Lavigne…What the Hell (2011)
  39. Pink…U + Ur Hand (2006)
  40. Backstreet Boys…Quit Playing Games with My Heart (1996)

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Top 50 Blues Songs of All Time

image from bluesmusicfan.com

This DMDB list was created by aggregating 19 lists focused on the best blues songs of all time.

1. Muddy Waters…Mannish Boy (1955)
2. B.B. King…The Thrill Is Gone (1969)
3. John Lee Hooker…Boom Boom (1962)
4. Howlin’ Wolf…Smokestack Lightnin’ (1956)
5. Albert King…Born Under a Bad Sign (1967)
6. Muddy Waters…Hoochie Coochie Man (1954)
7. John Lee Hooker…Boogie Chillen (1948)
8. Robert Johnson…Sweet Home Chicago (1936)
9. Robert Johnson…Hellhound on My Trail (1937)
10. Elmore James…I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom (1952)

11. T-Bone Walker…Call It Stormy Monday (1948)
12. Little Walter…Juke (1952)
13. Robert Johnson…Cross Road Blues (1936)
14. Big Joe Williams…Baby Please Don’t Go (1941)
15. Muddy Waters…Got My Mojo Working (1956)
16. Bessie Smith…Nobody Knows You When’ You’re Down and Out (1929)
17. Howlin’ Wolf…How Many More Years (1951)
18. Son House…Death Letter (1930)
19. Otis Rush…I Can’t Quit You Baby (1956)
20. Blind Willie McTell…Statesboro Blues (1928)

21. The Jimi Hendrix Experience…Red House (1967)
22. Freddie King…I’m Tore Down (1961)
23. Junior Wells with Buddy Guy…Messin’ with the Kid (1970)
24. Big Mama Thornton…Ball N’ Chain (1968)
25. Robert Johnson…Come on in My Kitchen (1937)
26. Robert Johnson…I Believe I’ll Dust My Broom (1936)
27. Canned Heat…On the Road Again (1968)
28. Sonny Boy Williamson #1…Good Morning Little School (1937)
29. Guitar Slim…The Things That I Used to Do (1954)
30. Muddy Waters…Rollin’ Stone (1950)

31. Little Walter…My Babe (1955)
32. Buddy Guy…Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues (1991)
33. Robert Johnson…Love in Vain (1937)
34. Leroy Carr…How Long, How Long Blues (1928)
35. Clarence “Pinetop” Smith…Pine Top’s Boogie Woogie (1929)
36. Muddy Waters…I Can’t Be Satisfied (1948)
37. Etta James…I Just Want to Make Love to You (1961)
38. Howlin’ Wolf…The Killing Floor (1964)
39. Gary Moore…Still Got the Blues (1990)
40. Blind Willie Johnson…Dark Was the Night, Cold Was the Ground (1927)

41. Otis Rush…All Your Love (I Miss Loving) (1958)
42. Etta James…At Last (1961)
43. Lowell Fulson…Reconsider Baby (1954)
44. Robert Petway…Catfish Blus (1941)
45. Freddie King…Hideaway (1961)
46. Elmore James…The Sky Is Crying (1960)
47. Big Bill Broonzy…Key to the Highway (1941)
48. The Mississippi Sheiks…Sitting on Top of the World (1930)
49. Willie Dixon…Spoonful (1970)
50. Robert Johnson…Me and the Devil Blues (1937)


Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Songs Which Hit #1 More Than Once

In the history of the Billboard charts, 81 songs have reached number one in the hands of more than one artist. It was a common practice in the pre-rock era for multiple artists to record a song and for those versions to chart simultaneously. In the rock era, the occasional remake of a former #1 would find its way to the top. The most recent example is Christina Aguilera and company’s 2001 remake of LaBelle’s “Lady Marmalade.”

Also worthy of note: a handful of songs have hit #1 more than twice. “In the Good Old Summertime,” “The Glow-Worm,” and “To Each His Own” each topped the chart with three versions. Four different acts took “Peg O’ My Heart,” “Over There,” and “Till We Meet Again” to the top.

What follows is a ranking of the 81 songs to top the chart by more than one act. The list is ordered by total weeks spent at #1. After a song title, each chart-topping version is listed with the act, year it first charted, and weeks each version topped the chart.


25 weeks:

  1. Peg O’ My Heart (Charles Harrison, 1913, 7 wks; The Harmonicats, 1947, 8 wks; Buddy Clark, 1947, 6 wks; The Three Suns, 1947, 4 wks)
    22 weeks:

  2. The Third Man Theme (Anton Karas, 1950, 11 wks; Guy Lombardo, 1950, 11 wks)
    21 weeks:

  3. The Gypsy (The Ink Spots, 1946, 13 wks; Dinah Shore, 1946, 8 wks)
  4. Oh What It Seemed to Be (Frankie Carle & Marjorie Hughes, 1946, 11 wks; Frank Sinatra, 1946, 8 wks)
    17 weeks:

  5. Over There (American Quarter, 1917, 9 wks; Nora Bayes, 1917, 3 wks; Peerless Quartet, 1917, 2 wks; Enrico Caruso, 1918, 3 wks)
  6. In the Good Old Summertime (J.W. Myers, 1902, 7 wks; Haydn Quartet, 1903, 6 wks; Sousa’s Band, 1903, 4 wks)
    15 weeks:

  7. It’s a Long, Long Way to Tipperary (American Quartet, 1914, 7 wks; John McCormack, 1915, 8 wks)
    14 weeks:

  8. Cruising Down the River on a Sunday Afternoon (Blue Barron & His Orchestra, 1949, 7 wks; Rus Morgan & the Skylarks, 1949, 7 wks)
  9. My Blue Heaven (Gene Austin, 1927, 13 wks; Paul Whiteman, 1927, 1 wk)
  10. On the Banks of the Wabash (George J. Gaskin, 1897, 10 wks; Steve Porter, 1898, 4 wks)
  11. Shine on, Harvest Moon (Harry MacDonough & Elise Stevenson, 1909, 9 wks; Ada Jones & Billy Murray, 1909, 5 wks)
    13 weeks:

  12. Till We Meet Again (Henry Burr & Albert Campbell, 1919, 9 wks; Nicholas Orlando’s Orcestra with Harry MacDonough, 1919; 2 wks; Charles Hart with Lewis James, 1919, 1 wk; Lewis James & Charles Hart, 1919, 1 wk)
  13. The Glow-Worm (Victor Orchestra, 1908, 5 wks; Lucy Isabelle Marsh, 1908, 5 wks; The Mills Brothers, 1952, 3 wks)
  14. The Sidewalks of New York (Dan Quinn, 1895, 9 wks; J.W. Myers, 1895, 4 wks)
  15. Sweet Adeline (You’re the Flower of My Heart) (Haydn Quartet, 1904, 10 wks; Columbia Male Quartet, 1904, 3 wks)
  16. When You Were Sweet Sixteen (George J. Gaskin, 1900, 8 wks; Jere Mahoney, 1900, 5 wks)
    12 weeks:

  17. Alexander’s Ragtime Band (Arthur Collins & Byron Harlan, 1911, 10 wks; Bing Crosby & Connee Boswell, 1938, 2 wks)
  18. The Last Round-Up (George Olsen, 1933, 9 wks; Guy Lombardo & Carmen Lombardo, 1933, 3 wks)
    11 weeks:

  19. To Each His Own (Eddy Howard, 1946, 8 wks; Freddy Martin & Stuart Wade, 1946, 2 wks; The Ink Spots, 1946, 1 wk)
  20. A Bird in a Gilded Cage (Steve Porter, 1900, 6 wks; Jere Mahoney, 1900, 5 wks)
  21. Ramona (Gene Austin, 1928, 8 wks; Paul Whiteman, 1928, 3 wks)
  22. The Stars and Stripes Forever (John Philip Sousa, 1897, 8 wks; Sousa’s Band, 1901, 3 wks)
  23. Stormy Weather (Keeps Raining All the Time) (Leo Reisman, 1933, 8 wks; Ethel Waters, 1933, 3 wks)
    10 weeks:

  24. Beautiful Ohio (Henry Burr, 1919, 9 wks; Waldorf-Astoria Dance Orchestra, 1919, 1 wk)
  25. Bedelia (Haydn Quartet, 1904, 7 wks; Billy Muray, 1904, 3 wks)
  26. Deep Purple (Larry Clinton & Bea Wain, 1939, 9 wks; Nino Tempo & April Stevens, 1963, 1 wk)
  27. Hello Ma Baby (Len Spencer, 1899, 6 wks; Arthur Collins, 1899, 4 wks)
  28. A Hot Time in the Old Town (Dan Quinn, 1896, 7 wks; Len Spencer, 1897, 3 wks)
  29. Love Me and the World Is Mine (Henry Burr, 1906, 7 wks; Albert Campbell, 1906, 3 wks)
  30. Tell Me Pretty Maiden (Harry MacDonough & Grace Spencer, 1901, 7 wks; Byron Harlan with Frank Stanley, Joe Belmont, & Florodora Girls, 1901, 3 wks)
  31. There! I’ve Said It Again (Vaughn Monroe, 1945, 6 wks; Bobby Vinton, 1963, 4 wks)
  32. Wait Till the Sun Shines, Nellie (Byron Harlan, 1906, 9 wks; Harry Tally, 1906, 1 wk)
    9 weeks:

  33. Come Down Ma Evening Star (Mina Hickman, 1903, 5 wks; Henry Burr, 1903, 4 wks)
  34. Goodnight Sweetheart (Wayne King, 1931, 7 wks; Guy Lombardo & Carmen Lombardo, 1931, 2 wks)
  35. My Wild Irish Rose (Albert Campbell, 1899, 6 wks; George J. Gaskin, 1899, 3 wks)
  36. Scatter-Brain (Frankie Masters, 1939, 8 wks; Freddy Martin & Glenn Hughes, 1939, 1 wk)
  37. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Paul Whieman, 1933, 6 wks; The Platters, 1959, 3 wks)
  38. The Washington Post March (U.S. Marin Band, 1890, 6 wks; Sousa’s Band, 1895, 3 wks)
    8 weeks:

  39. By the Beautiful Sea (Heidelberg Quintet, 1914, 6 wks; Ada Jones & Billy Watkins, 1914, 2 wks)
  40. Down by the Old Mill Stream (Harry MacDonough, 1911, 7 wks; Arthur Clough & the Brunswick Quartet, 1911, 1 wk)
  41. Mr. Gallagher & Mr. Shean (Ed Gallagher & Al Shean, 1922, 6 wks; Ernest Hare & Billy Jones, 1922, 2 wks)
  42. The Music Goes ‘Round and ‘Round (Tommy Dorsey, 1935, 5 wks; Riley-Farley Orchestra, 1935, 3 wks)
    7 weeks:

  43. Blue Bell (Byron Harlan & Frank Stanley, 1904, 4 wks; Haydn Quartet & Harry MacDonough, 1904, 3 wks)
  44. I Didn’t Raise My Boy to Be a Soldier (Peerless Quartet, 1915, 4 wks; Morton Harvey, 1915, 3 wks)
  45. I’ll Be There (The Jackson 5, 1970, 5 wks; Mariah Carey, 1992, 2 wks)
  46. The Mansion of Aching Hearts (Harry MacDonough, 1902, 4 wks; Byron Harlan, 1902, 3 wks)
  47. Mother Machree (John McCormack, 1911, 5 wks; Will Oakland, 1911, 2 wks)
  48. This Year’s Kisses (Hal Kemp with Skinnay Ennis, 1937, 4 wks; Benny Goodman, 1937, 3 wks)
  49. Yes! We Have No Bananas (Billy Jones, 1923, 5 wks; Ben Selvin with Irving Kaufman, 1923, 2 wks)
  50. Young Love (Tab Hunter, 1956, 6 wks; Sonny James, 1956, 1 wk)
    6 weeks:

  51. Blue Moon (Glen Gray with Kenny Sargent, 1935, 3 wks; The Marcels, 1961, 3 wks)
  52. I’m Forever Blowing Bubbles (Ben Selvin, 1919, 4 wks; Henry Burr & Albert Campbell, 1919, 2 wks)
  53. I’ve Got a Pocketful of Dreams (Bing Crosby, 1938, 4 wks; Russ Morgan, 1938, 2 wks)
  54. I’ve Got Rings on My Fingers (Ada Jones, 1909, 4 wks; Blanche Ring, 1909, 2 wks)
  55. Lady Marmalade (LaBelle, 1974, 1 wk; Christina Aguilera with Lil’ Kim, Mya, & Pink, 2001, 5 wks)
  56. The Love Nest (John Steel, 1920, 4 wks; Art Hickman, 1920, 2 wks)
  57. Red Sails in the Sunset (Guy Lombardo & Carmen Lombardo, 1935, 4 wks; Bing Crosby, 1935, 2 wks)
  58. Tiger Rag (The Original Dixieland Jazz Band, 1918, 2 wks; The Mills Brothers, 1931, 4 wks)
    5 weeks:

  59. All Alone (Paul Whiteman, 1925, 3 wks; John McCormack, 1925, 2 wks)
  60. All of Me (Paul Whiteman, 1932, 3 wks; Louis Armstrong, 1932, 2 wks)
  61. Always (George Olsen, 1926, 3 wks; Vincent Lopez, 1926, 2 wks)
  62. Butterfly (Andy Williams, 1957, 3 wks; Charlie Gracie, 1957, 2 wks)
  63. Come Josephine in My Flying Machine (Ada Jones with Billy Murray & the American Quartet, 1911, 3 wks; Blanche Ring, 1911, 2 wks)
  64. Go Away Little Girl (Steve Lawrence, 1962, 2 wks; Donny Osmond, 1971, 3 wks)
  65. Happy Days Are Here Again (Benny Meroff with Dusty Rhodes, 1930, 3 wks; Ben Selvin, 1930, 2 wks)
  66. It’s Been a Long, Long Time (Harry James with Kitty Kallen, 1945, 3 wks; Bing Crosby with the Les Brown Trio, 1945, 2 wks)
  67. Lean on Me (Bill Withers, 1972, 3 wks; Club Nouveau, 1987, 2 wks)
  68. The Star-Spangled Banner (Prince’s Orchestra, 1916, 2 wks; John McCormack, 1917, 3 wks)
  69. When a Man Loves a Woman (Percy Sledge, 1966, 2 wks; Michael Bolton, 1991, 3 wks)
  70. When It’s Springtime in the Rockies (Ben Selvin, 1930, 3 wks; Hilo Hawaiian Orchestra, 1930, 2 wks)
    4 weeks:

  71. Change Partners (Fred Astair, 1938, 2 wks; Jimmy Dorsey, 1938, 2 wks)
  72. Managua, Nicaraga (Freddy Martin, 1947, 3 wks; Guy Lomardo, 1947, 1 wk)
  73. The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down (Russ Morgan, 1937, 2 wks; Shep Fields, 1937, 2 wks)
  74. Mr. Five by Five (Freddie Slack, 1942, 2 wks; Harry James, 1942, 2 wks)
  75. The Object of My Affection (Jimmy Grier, 1934, 2 wks: Boswell Sisters, 1935, 2 wks)
    3 weeks:

  76. The Loco-Motion (Grand Funk Railroad, 1974, 2 wks; Little Eva, 1962, 1 wk)
  77. Mam’selle (Art Lund, 1947, 2 wks; Frank Sinatra, 1947, 1 wk)
  78. You Keep Me Hangin’ On (The Supremes, 1966, 2 wks; Kim Wilde, 1986, 1 wk)
    2 weeks:

  79. Open the Door, Richard (Count Basie, 1947, 1 wk; The Three Flames, 1947, 1 wk)
  80. Please Mr. Postman (The Marvelettes, 1961, 1 wk; Carpenters, 1974, 1 wk)
  81. Venus (Shocking Blue, 1969, 1 wk; Bananarama, 1986, 1 wk)

Saturday, August 8, 2015

August 8, 1965: The Beatles hit #1 in the UK with Help!

Originally posted March 3, 2010. Last updated September 2, 2018.

Help! (soundtrack)

The Beatles

Released:

  • Aug. 6, 1965 UK
  • Aug. 13, 1965 US

Sales (in millions):
US: 3.0
UK: 0.9
IFPI: --
World (estimated): 10.3


Peak:
US: 1 9
UK: 19
Canada: --
Australia: 111

Quotable: “Reflects the toll [of] the most popular band…but…The Beatles turn their pain into some of their finest work.” – Lori Latimer, Ink Blot Magazine


Genre: pop/rock


Album Tracks/Hit Songs:

Click here for the chart codes for singles/hit songs.

UK Album:

  1. Help! [2:21] (7/19/65) #1 UK, #1 US
  2. The Night Before [2:36]
  3. You've Got to Hide Your Love Away [2:11]
  4. I Need You (Harrison) [ 2:31]
  5. Another Girl [2:08]
  6. You're Gonna Lose That Girl [2:20]
  7. Ticket to Ride [3:12] (4/9/65) #1 UK, #1 US
  8. Act Naturally (Morrison/Russell) [2:33] (9/13/65) #47 US
  9. It's Only Love [1:58]
  10. You Like Me Too Much (Harrison) [2:38]
  11. Tell Me What You See (Harrison/Lennon/McCartney) [2:39]
  12. I've Just Seen a Face [2:07]
  13. Yesterday [2:07] (9/13/65) #1 US, #8 UK
  14. Dizzy Miss Lizzy (Williams) [2:54]
All songs written by Lennon/McCartney unless otherwise noted.

US soundtrack:

  1. Help!
  2. The Night Before
  3. From Me to You Fantasy (instrumental) *
  4. You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away
  5. I Need You
  6. In the Tyrol (instrumental) *
  7. Another Girl
  8. Another Hard Day’s Night (instrumental) *
  9. Ticket to Ride
  10. The Bitter End *
  11. You’re Gonna Lose That Girl
  12. The Chase (instrumental) *
* Songs not featured on UK album.

Check out the DMDB Beatles’ singles page for a complete singles discography.

Review:

“Like almost everything that the Beatles did from this record on, [this album is] not merely good, but groundbreaking.” JA “The harmonies [are] stellar [and] the individual vocal performances are…solid.” MU However, despite “those fantastic melodies and ringing guitars that keep up the light-hearted pop facade, [the album also] reflects the toll that being the most popular band in the world was taking on The Beatles. But in the fashion of all the great ones, The Beatles turn their pain into some of their finest work.” LL

The album kicks off with the instantly classic title track, “where the brash arrangement disguises Lennon's desperation” STE in “one of his most earnest and painful pleas for emotional salvation.” LL “It’s Lennon’s desperate state of mind that drives this album.” LL It’s also strange that ”John Lennon's confessional song became the title for a silly James Bond spoof…The funny thing is, it works both ways--as a young man's personal statement about learning to open up to others, and as the frantic theme for an exotic espionage chase comedy starring those lovable mop-tops.” JE

”Driven by an indelible 12-string guitar, Ticket to Ride is another masterpiece” STE from Lennon; indeed, it is “the best pop song The Beatles had written at this stage.” AD “Instrumentally, [the] off-beat rhythm was Ringo's masterpiece.” CDU “The dragging beat…adds perfectly to the lyrics’ tortured confusion.” LL

”The jaunty The Night Before and Another Girl,” STE the latter of which features “a great guitar solo by Paul,” DBW are “two very fine tunes that simply update his melodic signature.” STE They might both be “unremarkable without…George’s killer guitar work.” LL

”George is writing again” STE and “starting to contribute quality compositions [like] I Need You.” DBW “It's a very simple song, but…sounds nice.” AD George’s other song, “You Like Me Too Much, re-introduces piano into a Beatles album and works as a very nice unassumingly enjoyable track.” AD Even if George’s “two contributions don't touch Lennon and McCartney's originals, they hold their own against much of their British pop peers.” STE

“Like the previous album's ‘Im a Loser,’ You've Got to Hide Your Love Away was Lennon's nod to the influence of Bob Dylan.” CDU The simultaneously ”plaintive” STE and “charmingly ramshackle” AD song was “supposedly written about Beatle manager Brian Epstein’s homosexuality. It is an acoustic number so tender, it hurts just to think about it.” LL

“John is absolutely vicious in his delivery of You're Going to Lose That Girl,” MU “the kind of song McCartney effortlessly tosses off.” STE It demonstrates that “John's lyrics are advancing rapidly.” JA “if not quite a classic [it] is at least hugely charming and enjoyable, with some fine Beatles harmonies and playful vocals all round.” AD “You’re Going to Lose That Girl”

”The Bakersfield bounce” STE of ”the superfluous country number Act NaturallyJA “adds new flavor [and is] an ideal showcase for Ringo's amiable vocals.” STE

Among the six songs Lennon contributed are ”a pair of minor numbers,” STE but even these have moments. “It's Only Love has some haunting guitar sounds and a beautiful John vocal” AD while “even a…filler tune like Tell Me What You See is totally redeemed by the incredible harmony on the refrain line.” MU

“McCartney's gift for melody was obvious in I've Just Seen a Face,” CDU “a frighteningly modern-sounding semi-acoustic number,” JA which is “an irresistible folk-rock gem.” STE

Paul’s “widely imitated and covered” JA Yesterday is “a simple, beautiful ballad whose arrangement” STE is ”a startling, wildly successful experiment dispensing with the normal four-piece rock band backing track in favor of a string quartet.” JA The composition “was the start of a stellar series of McCartney ballads with strings (‘Eleanor Rigby,’ ‘She's Leaving Home’)” CDU and also “suggested much more sophisticated and adventurous musical territory, which the group immediately began exploring with Rubber Soul.” STE

”The rocking…Dizzy Miss Lizzie,” JA “seemingly included for the hell of it,” AD is “one of their best covers.” DBW It is a full-fledged “vocal scorcher” AD that “gives John an opportunity to flex his rock & roll muscle.” STE It “sounds like John’s raucous answer to Paul's ‘Kansas City/Hey, Hey, Hey, Hey’ vocal on Beatles for Sale.” JE In closing out the album, this song also closed the book on another of the group’s chapters; “Help! was the last Beatles album to feature a cover version.” CDU

“Of course, it's essential – as are…all the Beatles' albums.” JE “Every Beatles album could be a greatest hits record. They all have songs that you absolutely need. Help! is no exception.” LL


Review Source(s):

Awards:


Related DMDB Link(s):