Tuesday, December 31, 1996

Cashbox – Songs of the Year, 1950-1996

This list was created by taking Cash Box magazine’s top 100 song list (see here) and putting the songs in order by year and then by putting songs which hit #1 on Cash Box in order by number of weeks. In the event of ties, the song with more points in Dave’s Music Database was ranked higher.

  • 1950: The Third Man Theme…Anton Karas
  • 1951: It’s All in the Game…Tommy Edwards
  • 1952: Auf Wiederseh’n Sweetheart…Vera Lynn with the Ronald Shaw Orchestra
  • 1953: Where Is Your Heart (Song from “Moulin Rouge”)…Percy Faith with Felicia Sanders
  • 1954: Wanted…Perry Como with Hugo Winterhalter’s Orchestra
  • 1955: The Ballad of Davy Crockett…Bill Hayes
  • 1956: Singing the Blues…Guy Mitchell
  • 1957: All Shook Up…Elvis Presley
  • 1958: Smoke Gets in Your Eyes…The Platters
  • 1959: Mack the Knife…Bobby Darin

  • 1960: The Twist…Chubby Checker
  • 1961: Stand by Me…Ben E. King
  • 1962: Monster Mash…Bobby “Boris” Pickett & the Crypt-Kickers
  • 1963: I Want to Hold Your Hand…The Beatles
  • 1964: Hello, Dolly!...Louis Armstrong & the All-Stars
  • 1965: (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction…The Rolling Stones
  • 1966: I’m a Believer…The Monkees
  • 1967: Love Is Blue…Paul Mauriat
  • 1968: Hey Jude…The Beatles
  • 1969: Sugar, Sugar…The Archies

  • 1970: I’ll Be There…The Jackson 5
  • 1971: Joy to the World…Three Dog Night
  • 1972: Alone Again (Naturally)…Gilbert O’Sullivan
  • 1973: Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree…Tony Orlando & Dawn
  • 1974: I Honestly Love You…Olivia Newton-John
  • 1975: Bohemian Rhapsody…Queen
  • 1976: Mary MacGregor…Torn Between Two Lovers
  • 1977: You Light Up My Life…Debby Boone
  • 1978: Le Freak…Chic
  • 1979: My Sharona…The Knack

  • 1980: Another One Bites the Dust…Queen
  • 1981: Endless Love…Lionel Richie & Diana Ross
  • 1982: Abracadabra…Steve Miller Band
  • 1983: Flashdance…What a Feeling…Irene Cara
  • 1984: Like a Virgin…Madonna
  • 1985: Say You, Say Me…Lionel Richie
  • 1986: Livin’ on a Prayer…Bon Jovi
  • 1987: Faith…George Michael
  • 1988: Sweet Child O’ Mine…Guns N’ Roses
  • 1989: Another Day in Paradise…Phil Collins

  • 1990: Because I Love You (The Postman Song)…Stevie B
  • 1991: Everything I Do (I Do It for You)…Bryan Adams
  • 1992: End of the Road…Boyz II Men
  • 1993: Whoomp! There It Is…Tag Team
  • 1994: I’ll Make Love to You…Boyz II Men
  • 1995: Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix)…Los Del Rio
  • 1996: I Love You Always Forever…Donna Lewis

Saturday, December 7, 1996

No Doubt spend first of 16 weeks atop the airplay chart with “Don’t Speak”

First posted 1/22/2020.

Don’t Speak

No Doubt

Writer(s):Gwen Stefani/Eric Stefani (see lyrics here)


Released: April 15, 1996


First Charted: October 19, 1996


Peak: 116a US, 19 RR, 6 AC, 114 A40, 12 AA, 2 MR, 13 UK, 12 CN, 18 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): -- US, 1.01 UK, 2.17 world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): 0.9 radio, -- video, -- streaming

Awards:

Review:

“Don’t Speak” is one of the biggest #1 pop songs in history, but it never hit the Billboard Hot 100. During the ‘90s, record companies often held radio songs back from release to push album sales instead. While Billboard did track airplay, they didn’t permit songs without a physical single release to chart on the Hot 100. With 16 weeks on the airplay chart, the only song on one of Billboard’s pop charts to spend more weeks at #1 is 1947’s “Near You” by Francis Craig. The song did top the charts in more than a dozen countries including Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom. It was also nominated for a Grammy for Song of the Year. WK

No Doubt had previously released two albums which had gone largely unnoticed before 1995’s Tragic Kingdom. Top-ten alternative rock hits “Just a Girl” and “Spiderwebs” finally put the spotlight on the band; “Don’t Speak” propelled the album to the top of the Billboard album chart for nine weeks.

According to Tom Dumont, the band’s guitarist, the original version of “Don’t Speak” was written primarily by Eric Stefani, a former band member, as a love song. WK Gwen Stefani, his sister and lead singer of the band, changed the lyrics almost completely after her breakup with bandmate Tony Kanal. WK As she said, “It used to be more upbeat, more of a seventies rock-type thing. [When] Tony and I broke up…it turned into a sad song.” WK

The video put a different twist on the song by turning it into a commentary on the media attention given to Gwen. During the video, the rest of the band appear upset and shoot dirty looks at her. Kanal said, “We didn’t want it to be about a normal breakup. So we thought, ‘What would be the saddst thing that could happen? The band splitting up?’ So that’s what the video’s about.” SF


Resources and Related Links:

Friday, December 6, 1996

Ira Gershwin: Top 50 Songs

First posted 12/12/2019.

image from Gershwin.com

Ira Gershwin was a classical/musical theater composer born Israel Gershowitz on this day one hundred years ago – 12/6/1896 – in New York City, NY. He died 8/17/1983. Most of the time he collaborated with his brother, George Gershwin His songs “I Got Rhythm” and “Someone to Watch Over Me” are featured in the DMDB book The Top 100 Songs of the Pre-Rock Era, 1890-1953. For a complete list of this act’s DMDB honors, check out the DMDB Music Maker Encyclopedia entry.


Top 50 Songs

Dave’s Music Database lists are determined by song’s appearances on best-of lists as well as chart success, sales, radio airplay, streaming, and awards. Many of these songs have been recorded multiple times. Only the highest-ranked version in Dave’s Music Database is included in this list. There are also some songs not identified as being by any particular artist. Additionally, songs which hit #1 on the following charts are noted: United States’ pop charts (US) and Hit Parade (HP).

DMDB Top 1%:

1. I Got Rhythm (Red Nichols, 1930)
2. Someone to Watch Over Me (Gertrude Lawrence, 1926)
3. They Can’t Take That Away from Me (Fred Astaire with Johnny Greer’s Orchestra, 1937) #1 US
4. The Man I Love (Marion Harris, 1928)
5. Summertime (Billie Holiday, 1936)
6. I Can’t Get Started (Buny Berigan, 1938)
7. Embraceable You (Red Nichols with Dick Robertson, 1930)

DMDB Top 5%:

8. Oh, Lady Be Good (Paul Whiteman, 1925)
9. Fascinating Rhythm (Cliff Edwards, 1925)
10. Nice Work if You Can Get It (Fred Astaire with Ray Noble’s Orchestra, 1937) #1 US

11. Love Walked In (Sammy Kaye with Tommy Ryan, 1938) #1 US, HP
12. Strike Up the Band (Red Nichols, 1930)
13. Do Do Do (Gertrude Lawrence, 1927)
14. Love Is Here to Stay (Larry Clinton with Bea Wain, 1938)
15. S’ Wonderful (Sarah Vaughan, 1927)
16. But Not for Me (Ella Fitzgerald, 1959)
17. Sweet and Low Down (Harry Archer & His Orchestra, 1926)
18. A Foggy Day in London Town (Fred Astaire with Ray Noble’s Orchestra, 1937)
19. Clap Yo’ Hands (Roger Wolfe Kahn, 1927)
20. It Ain’t Necessarily So (Leo Reisman, 1935)

21. Of Thee I Sing ( Ben Selvin, 1932)
22. Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off (Fred Astaire with Johnny Greer’s Orchestra, 1937)
23. Mine (Emil Coleman, 1933)
24. Liza (All the Clouds'll Roll Away) (Al Jolson with Bob Haring’s Orchestra, 1929)
25. That Certain Feeling (Paul Whiteman, 1929)
26. You’re a Builder Upper (Harold Arlen with Leo Reisman’s Orchestra, 1934)
27. I’ve Got a Crush on You (Frank Sinatra, 1948)

DMDB Top 10%:

28. The Man That Got Away (Judy Garland with Ray Heindorf & the Warner Brothers Studio Orchestra, 1954)
29. Bidin’ My Time (Foursome, 1930)
30. They All Laughed (Fred Astaire with Johnny Greer’s Orchestra, 1937)
31. Funny Face (Arden-Ohman Orchestra with Johnny Marvin, 1928)
32. My One and Only (Jane Green with Nat Shilkret’s Orchestra, 1928)
33. I Got Plenty O’ Nuttin’ (Leo Reisman, 1935)
34. Fun to Be Fooled (Henry King with Joe Study, 1934)

DMDB Top 10%:

35. Shall We Dance? (Fred Astaire with Johnny Greer’s Orchestra, 1937)
36. Things Are Looking Up (Fred Astaire with Ray Noble’s Orchestra, 1937)
37. For You, for Me, Forevermore (Dick Haymes with Judy Garland & the Gordon Jenkins Orchestra, 1947)
38. Bess, You Is My Woman (Porgy and Bess cast, 1935)
39. I Loves You, Porgy (Porgy and Bess cast, 1935)

DMDB Top 10%:

40. How Long Has This Been Going On? (Bobbe Arnst with Mary O’Brien, 1927)
41. Isn’t It a Pity? (George Givot with Josephine Huston, 1932)
42. Let’s Take a Walk Around the Block (1934)
43. Slap That Bass (Fred Astaire with Dudley Dickerson, 1937)
44. I Was Doing All Right (Ella Logan, 1938)
45. He Loves and She Loves (Ella Fitzgerald, 1959)
46. Maybe (Nat Shilkret, 1926)
47. Anything for You (1921)
48. Love Is in the Air (1925)
49. Somebody Stole My Heart Away (1929)
50. Ask Me Again (1930)


Awards:



Saturday, November 16, 1996

Cash Box's Top 100 Singles 1958-1996

First posted 11/28/2011; last updated 3/23/2020.

Cash Box’s Top 100 Singles

1958-1996

Cash Box magazine first issued a top 100 singles chart for the September 13, 1958 issue when they expanded their top 75 chart to one hundred positions. The original version of the magazine lasted through November 16, 1996. Using a progressive inverse point system, Cash Box chart archivist Randy Price compiled a list of the top 100 songs according to the Cash Box charts. Here’s the list:

  1. Chubby Checker “The Twist” (1960)
  2. Bobby Darin “Mack the Knife” (1959)
  3. The Monkees “I’m a Believer” (1966)
  4. Boyz II Men “End of the Road” (1992)
  5. The Beatles “I Want to Hold Your Hand” (1964)
  6. The Beatles “Hey Jude” (1968)
  7. Debby Boone “You Light Up My Life” (1977)
  8. Johnny Horton “The Battle of New Orleans” (1959)
  9. Percy Faith & His Orchestra “The Theme from “A Summer Place” (1960)
  10. Queen “Bohemian Rhapsody” (1976)

  11. Boyz II Men “I’ll Make Love to You” (1994)
  12. Lionel Richie & Diana Ross “Endless Love” (1981)
  13. Olivia Newton-John “Physical” (1981)
  14. The Archies “Sugar Sugar” (1969)
  15. Paul Mauriat & His Orchestra “Love Is Blue (L’Amour Est Bleu)” (1968)
  16. Whitney Houston “I Will Always Love You” (1992)
  17. Boris Pickett & The Crypt-Kickers “Monster Mash” (1962)
  18. Louis Armstrong “Hello, Dolly!” (1964)
  19. The Fifth Dimension “Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In” (1969)
  20. Queen “Another One Bites the Dust” (1980)

  21. Three Dog Night “Joy to the World” (1971)
  22. Los Del Rio “Macarena (Bayside Boys Mix)” (1996)
  23. Mariah Carey & Boyz II Men “One Sweet Day” (1995)
  24. The New Vaudeville Band “Winchester Cathedral” (1966)
  25. Irene Cara “Flashdance...What a Feelin’” (1983)
  26. The Rolling Stones “Honky Tonk Women” (1969)
  27. Chic “Le Freak” (1978)
  28. The Bee Gees “Night Fever” (1978)
  29. The Police “Every Breath You Take” (1983)
  30. Boyz II Men “On Bended Knee” (1994)

  31. Sir Mix-A-Lot “Baby Got Back” (1992)
  32. Blondie “Call Me” (1980)
  33. The J. Geils Band “Centerfold” (1981)
  34. The Bee Gees “How Deep Is Your Love” (1977)
  35. Andy Gibb “Shadow Dancing” (1978)
  36. Tony Orlando & Dawn “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round The Ole Oak Tree” (1973)
  37. Tag Team “Whoomp! (There It Is)” (1993)
  38. The Four Seasons “December 1963 (Oh, What a Night)” (1976)
  39. The Platters “Smoke Gets in Your Eyes” (1958)
  40. Ben E. King “Stand by Me” (1961)

  41. The Knack “My Sharona” (1979)
  42. Tommy Edwards “It’s All in the Game” (1958)
  43. Phil Collins “Another Day in Paradise” (1989)
  44. Ray Charles “I Can’t Stop Loving You” (1962)
  45. B.J. Thomas “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head” (1969)
  46. Donna Lewis “I Love You Always Forever” (1996)
  47. Lionel Richie “Say You, Say Me” (1985)
  48. Snap! “Rhythm Is a Dancer” (1992)
  49. Marvin Gaye “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” (1968)
  50. The Steve Miller Band “Abracadabra” (1982)

  51. UB40 “Can’t Help Falling in Love” (1993)
  52. Don McLean “American Pie” (1971)
  53. Andy Gibb “I Just Want to Be Your Everything” (1977)
  54. Ssgt. Barry Sadler “The Ballad Of The Green Berets” (1966)
  55. The Jackson 5 “I’ll Be There” (1969)
  56. Kenny Rogers “Lady” (1980)
  57. Ferrante & Teicher “Exodus” (1960)
  58. Chubby Checker “Limbo Rock” (1962)
  59. Mariah Carey “Fantasy” (1995)
  60. Bee Gees “Stayin’ Alive” (1978)

  61. Men at Work “Down Under” (1982)
  62. The Beatles “She Loves You” (1964)
  63. Janet Jackson “That’s the Way Love Goes” (1993)
  64. Gilbert O’Sullivan “Alone Again (Naturally)” (1972)
  65. Jim Reeves “He’ll Have to Go” (1960)
  66. The Box Tops “The Letter” (1967)
  67. The Rolling Stones “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” (1965)
  68. Exile “Kiss You All Over” (1978)
  69. Elvis Presley “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” (1960)
  70. The Singing Nun “Dominique” (1963)

  71. Survivor “Eye of the Tiger” (1982)
  72. Mary MacGregor “Torn Between Two Lovers” (1977)
  73. Daryl Hall & John Oates “Maneater” (1983)
  74. Jimmy Dean “Big Bad John” (1961)
  75. The Human League “Don’t You Want Me?” (1982)
  76. Kim Carnes “Bette Davis Eyes” (1981)
  77. Toni Braxton “You’re Makin’ Me High”/“Let It Flow” (1996)
  78. The Monkees “Last Train to Clarksville” (1966)
  79. Real McCoy “Another Night” (1994)
  80. Glen Campbell “Rhinestone Cowboy” (1975)

  81. The Partridge Family “I Think I Love You” (1970)
  82. The Everly Brothers “Cathy’s Clown” (1960)
  83. Mr. Aker Bilk “Stranger on the Shore” (1962)
  84. USA for Africa “We Are the World” (1985)
  85. Roy Orbison “(Oh) Pretty Woman” (1964)
  86. The Kingsmen “Louie Louie” (1963)
  87. Elvis Presley “It’s Now or Never” (1960)
  88. Stevie B “Because I Love You (The Postman Song)” (1990)
  89. Bobbie Gentry “Ode to Billie Joe” (1967)
  90. Tony Orlando & Dawn “Knock Three Times” (1970)

  91. Dire Staits “Money for Nothing” (1985)
  92. The Supremes “Love Child” (1968)
  93. Bobby Lewis “Tossin’ and Turnin’” (1961)
  94. Rod Stewart “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy?” (1979)
  95. The Marvelettes “Please Mr. Postman” (1961)
  96. Lulu “To Sir with Love” (1967)
  97. Lawrence Welk & His Orchestra “Calcutta” (1961)
  98. The Kingston Trio “Tom Dooley” (1958)
  99. The Starland Vocal Band “Afternoon Delight” (1976)
  100. George Michael “Faith” (1987)

Saturday, November 2, 1996

“Macarena” spends 14th week on top

First posted 10/30/2019; updated 4/12/2020.

Macarena (Bayside Boys Remix)

Los Del Rio

Writer(s): Rafael Ruiz, Perdigones, Antonio Romero Monge, SWK, Carlos de Yarza (see lyrics here)


First Charted: September 2, 1995


Peak: 114 US, 12 CB, 28 AC, 19 A40, 2 UK, 16 CN, 19 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 4.3 US, 0.6 UK, 11.0 world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 134.2 video, -- streaming

Awards:

About the Song:

“Macarena” was a Spanish dance song originally released in 1993 by Los Del Rio, a Spanish flamenco-pop lounge act comprised of Antonio Romeo Monge and Rafael Ruiz. Monge wrote the chorus on the spot at a private party in Venezuela. WK Inspired by a local flamenco dancer named Diana Patricia, SF he sang about a woman named Magdalena. The term was associated with Mary Magdalene and her seedy past and someone who was sassy and sensuous. WK It was renamed Macarena, which means “Mother of God.” SF

Jammin’ Johnny Carride, a radio personality and club DJ in Miami, saw how popular the song was with clubgoers and snuck in an airing of the song at his radio station, despite their policy to exclude non-English songs. The program director was hooked, but wanted an English remix. SF Carride recruited Mike Triay and Carlos de Yarza, his partners at Bayside Records, to remix the song. They added English-language lyrics and a new dance beat. WK In the original version, Macarena carouses with other men to get revenge on her boyfriend, Vitorino, who joined the army. The Bayside Boys remix, featuring lyrics sung by Carla Vanessa, paints her as more promiscuous. SF

The remix topped the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in August 1996 and stayed there for 14 weeks, making it one of the longest-running #1 songs in history. Its 60 weeks on the chart also made it, at the time, the longest-charting #1 song in the chart’s history. WK Billboard named it the #1 song of the year.

With easy-to-learn, accompanying dance movies, the song became an international dance sensation and iconic presence at weddings, parties, and sporting events. It was even featured at the 1996 Democratic National Convention when Vice President Al Gore, known for his stiffness, made a joke about doing the Macarena and then stood motionless for a few seconds. In 2002, VH1 ranked it the greatest one-hit wonder of all-time. WK In 2012, Billboard ranked it the #1 all-time Latin song. WK


Resources and Related Links:

Saturday, October 26, 1996

Toni Braxton charted with "Un-Break My Heart": October 26, 1996

Originally posted October 26, 2011.



Braxton was a preacher’s daughter “raised in a household where pop music was strictly forbidden.” KX In 1990, she recorded with her sisters as The Braxtons, but by 1992 she’d launched a solo career. In 1993, she landed the Grammy for Best New Artist and found her way into the top 10 of the pop charts with “Another Sad Love Song” and “Breathe Again”.

Braxton’s second album, Secrets, proved she would not suffer the Best New Artist Grammy curse of disappearing from the music scene. Lead-off single “You’re Makin’ Me High” was a #1 hit which won a Grammy for R&B Female Vocal.

However, even more successful was the album’s second single, “Un-Break My Heart”, a ballad of “blistering heartbreak” SF in which Braxton begs a former lover to return and undo the pain he has caused. SF In her “distinctive, husky alto” BB100 Braxton delivered a performance which was “both poignant and hopeful.” TB The song’s eleven weeks on top of the Billboard Hot 100 put it amongst the biggest #1 songs of all time. It sold more than 4 million worldwide and won her yet another Grammy – this one for Pop Female Vocal.

The song was written by Diane Warren who’d penned such #1 hits as Chicago’s “Look Away” and Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me”, but this was her most successful song in the U.S. in terms of chart performance. SF Warren said she knew immediately that “Heart” would be a hit, but that Braxton didn’t want to sing it. Even after the song succeeded, Braxton told Warren she “didn’t want another one of those”. SF




Awards: Resources and Related Links:

Tuesday, October 22, 1996

Journey back with Trial by Fire after a decade

First posted 10/11/2008; updated 9/12/2020.

Trial by Fire

Journey


Released: October 22, 1996


Peak: 3 US, -- UK, 16 CN, -- AU


Sales (in millions): 1.0 US, -- UK, 3.0 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks:

Song Title (date of single release, chart peaks) Click for codes to singles charts.

  1. Message of Love (10/5/96, 18 AR, 36 CN)
  2. One More
  3. When You Love a Woman (10/12/96, 12 US, 1 AC, 3 CN, sales: ½ million)
  4. If He Should Break Your Heart (3/29/97, 21 AC, 13 CN)
  5. Forever in Blue
  6. Castles Burning
  7. Don’t Be Down on Me Baby
  8. Still She Cries
  9. Colors of the Spirit
  10. When I Think of You
  11. Easy to Fall
  12. Can’t Tame the Lion (2/8/97, 33 AR, 86 CN)
  13. It’s Just the Rain
  14. Trial by Fire
  15. Baby, I’m A-Leavin’ You [hidden track]


Total Running Time: 71:14


The Players:

  • Steve Perry (vocals)
  • Neal Schon (guitar, backing vocals)
  • Jonathan Cain (keyboards, rhythm guitar, backing vocals)
  • Ross Valory (bass, backing vocals)
  • Steve Smith (drums)

Rating:

2.948 out of 5.00 (average of 13 ratings)

About the Album:

After 1986’s Raised on Radio, Journey seemingly was gone for good as years went by without any new product. The band may have been on ice, but its individual members were still busy. Guitarist Neal Schon and keyboardist Jonathan Cain hooked up with singer John Waite and bassist Ricky Phillips, who’d both been in The Babys a decade earlier with Cain, to form Bad English. They didn’t reach Journey-like levels with sales, but did land a #1 pop hit with “When I See You Smile,” a feat which Journey never accomplished.

After two albums, Bad English went kaput, but Schon and that band’s drummer, Deen Castronovo, formed another rock band, Hardline. That band was even more short-lived and less successful than Bad English, but it made for another important relationship for Schon – he and Castronovo would work together again as Journey members down the road.

The Journey interim also saw a reunion of three past members – Gregg Rolie, Ross Valory, and Steve Smith, for the rock group The Storm. Meanwhile, Steve Perry put out a second solo album in 1994.

It was that last effort that made for the greatest likelihood of a Journey reunion since Perry hadn’t recorded in eight years. Indeed, two years later, 1996’s Trial by Fire saw the return of Journey, and not just any line-up, but “their most successful Escape-era line-up.” JM “With Jonathan Cain, Steve Perry, and Neal Schon leading Journey once again, and bassist Ross Valory and drummer Steve Smith behind them, it would seem that Trial by Fire would contain the same elements that gave them their stardom in the ‘80s.” AMG “Journey should have delivered a great album. They managed only half a great album.” CRM

“Perry’s singing hasn’t lost too much of its power, but the faster tunes come off as contrived and messy.” AMG “Sounding hard and scattered, the smoothness of their trademarked music is nowhere to be found, replaced with brash, beat-up, hollow rock riffs.” AMG “Big rock epics Castles Burning and Can’t Tame the Lion, were all bluster.” CRM “The ballads fair no better, as the passion that once flourished within the band when it came to slowing things down has long since faded.” AMG

“Journey achieved something close to peak form” CRM “on opener Message of Love and the ready-made wedding song When You Love a Woman,” CRM but even those songs are from the equals of some of their classic predecessors. “Message of Love” pales in comparison to classic rockers like “Don’t Stop Believin’,” “Any Way You Want It,” or “Separate Ways.” Meanwhile, “When You Love a Woman” had enough schlock to land it atop the AC chart, a first for Journey, but it didn’t make it more memorable than gems like “Open Arms,” “Lights,” or “Lovin’, Touchin’, Squeezin’.”

The reunion proved short-lived; “the band’s comeback tour was aborted after Perry injured his hip in a hiking accident. Tragically, he never sang for Journey again.” CRM

Resources and Related Links:

Friday, September 13, 1996

The Death of Tupac Shakur: September 13, 1996

Originally posted September 13, 2012.

image from vigilantcitizen.com

On September 7, 1996, rapper/actor Tupac Shakur (generally referred to as 2Pac) attended the Mike Tyson and Bruce Seldon boxing match in Las Vegas, Nevada. When Shakur and his Death Row Records entourage left the MGM Grand Hotel, a fight broke out. Later that night, Shakur was in the riding to an event with Death Row’s Suge Knight when a car pulled up beside them and fired roughly 13 shots at the car. Shakur was hit four times. He died a week later on September 13, 1996. He was 25.

He is estimated to have sold more than 100 million albums worldwide. His songs often depicted the harsh realities of ghetto life, largely inspired by his own upbringing in East Harlem. His parents’ background as members of the Black Panthers also shaped the social commentary in 2Pac’s music. Shakur faced trouble with the law and was caught up in the East Coast-West Coast rap rivalry commonly assumed to be the reason for his gang-style killing.

His music career started with Digital Underground in 1990. He worked as a roadie and backup dancer and contributed a rap on their “Same Song” for the 1991 film Nothing But Trouble. He launched his solo career that same year with 2Pacalypse Now. Me Against the World (1995) and All Eyez on Me (1996) are both DMDB top 1000 albums and went to #1, a position he attained three more times posthumously. He’s charted more than 20 albums; only four were released in his lifetime. Eleven of his albums have been top tens.


Awards:
Resources and Related Links:

Sunday, July 28, 1996

In Concert: Styx

image from youtube.com


Venue: Sandstone Ampitheatre; Bonner Springs, KS
Tour: Return to Paradise
The Players: Dennis DeYoung (vocals, keyboards), Tommy Shaw (vocals, guitar), James Young (vocals, guitar), Chuck Panozzo (bass), Todd Sucherman (drums)
Opening Act: Kansas


The Set List: *

1. A.D. 1928/Rockin' the Paradise
2. Blue Collar Man (Long Nights)
3. Lady
4. Too Much Time on My Hands
5. Snowblind
6. Suite Madame Blue
7. Crystal Ball
8. The Grand Illusion
9. Fooling Yourself (The Angry Young Man)
10. Show Me the Way
11. Boat on the River
12. Lorelei
13. Babe
14. Miss America
15. Come Sail Away

Encore:

16. Renegade
17. The Best of Times

* Setlist unknown so listing comes from 1997 Return to Paradise live album


Saturday, July 27, 1996

Spice Girls hit #1 in UK with “Wannabe”

First posted 10/31/2019.

Wannabe

Spice Girls

Writer(s): Spice Girls (Melanie Chisholm, Melanie Brown, Geri Halliwell, Victoria Adams, Emma Bunton), Matt Rowe, Richard Stannard (see lyrics here)


Released: June 26, 1996


First Charted: July 20, 1996


Peak: 14 US, 4 RR, 27 A40, 17 UK, 9 CN, 111 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales *: 2.91 US, 1.71 UK, 7.0 world (includes US + UK)


Radio Airplay *: --


Video Airplay *: 431.04


Streaming *: 365.0


* in millions

Review:

The Spice Girls consisted of Victoria Adams (later Beckham, aka “Posh Spice”), Melanie Brown (aka Mel B or “Scary Spice”), Emma Bunton (aka “Baby Spice”), Melanie Chisholm (aka Mel C or “Sporty Spice”), and Gerri Halliwell (aka “Ginger Spice”). The group was assembled in 1994 by the father-and-son team of Bob and Chris Herbert, a management team who, in the mid-‘90s, set out to create a girl group to compete with popular UK boy groups at the time like Take That and East 17. WK2 The group impressed songwriter Richard Stannard at an industry showcase that November and he and Matt Rowe, his songwriting partner, started writing with the group. WK1 The uptempo dance-pop “Wannabe,” which was written in 30 minutes and recorded in less than an hour, was designed as a showcase of their personalities WK1 and a celebration of female friendship and empowerment.

By 1995, the group left the Herberts’ Heart Management group and signed with Simon Fuller, WK2 best-known for creating American Idol. Brown and Halliwell were adamant that “Wannabe” should be the group’s lead single despite Fuller and the record company’s objections. The Spice Girls won in the end and a video was assembled for the song in May 1996. Within two hours of its appearance on British cable network The Box, the video had topped the viewers’ chart. It became the most requested track in the channel’s history. WK1

Between the success of the video, an early single release in Japan, and a flurry of promotion, the Spice Girls exploded in the UK immediately. The song debuted at #3 on the UK charts and climbed to the top the next week, where it stayed for 7 weeks. In the U.S., the song wouldn’t hit the top of the charts until February 1997, by which time the Spice Girls had already landed three #1’s in the UK and were on the brink of their fourth consecutive chart-topper, making them the first act in UK chart history to do so. BR1 All told, “Wannabe” hit the top in 37 countries and became the best-selling single in the world by a girl group. WK1 In 1997, it received the Brit Award for British Single of the Year. In 2014, it was named the most easily recognizable pop song of the last 60 years. WK1

The Spice Girls hit #1 eight times in the UK during the ‘90s, becoming the biggest act of the decade. Their debut album Spice sold 31 million sales worldwide, making it the best-selling album in history by a female group. With more than 85 million records sold worldwide during their career, they became the best-selling girl group of all time and the biggest pop success since the Beatles. WK2


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