Tuesday, November 8, 1994

Eagles reunite with Hell Freezes Over

11/8/1994:
First posted 3/26/2008; updated 9/16/2020.

Hell Freezes Over

Eagles


Released: November 8, 1994


Recorded: 1994


Peak: 12 US, 28 UK, 11 CN, 23 AU


Sales (in millions): 8.0 US, 0.1 UK, 12.1 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks: Click for codes to singles charts.

  1. Get Over It (10/22/94, 31 US, 4 AR, 21 AC, 4 CN, 74 AU) *
  2. Love Will Keep Us Alive (12/17/94, 22a US, 1 AC, 52 UK, 10 AU) *
  3. The Girl from Yesterday (11/12/94, 58 CW) *
  4. Learn to Be Still (1/21/95, 61a US, 33 AR, 15 AC, 9 CN) *
  5. Tequila Sunrise
  6. Hotel California
  7. Wasted Time
  8. Pretty Maids All in a Row
  9. I Can’t Tell You Why
  10. New York Minute (Don Henley solo song) (11/3/90, 48 US, 24 AR, 5 AC)
  11. The Last Resort
  12. Take It Easy
  13. In the City
  14. Life in the Fast Lane
  15. Desperado
* Studio cuts. Chart figures are only for those songs not previously featured on any Eagles’ albums.


Total Running Time: 72:36


The Players:

  • Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
  • Don Henley (vocals, drums)
  • Don Felder (guitar, vocals, mandolin)
  • Timothy B. Schmit (bass, vocals)
  • Joe Walsh (guitar, vocals, organ)

Rating:

3.582 out of 5.00 (average of 19 ratings)


Awards:

About the Album:

“The Eagles’ first newly recorded album in 14 years gets off to a good start with the rocker Get Over It, a timely piece of advice about accepting responsibility, followed by the tender ballad Love Will Keep Us Alive, the country-styled The Girl from Yesterday, and Learn to Be Still, one of Don Henley's more thoughtful statements.” AMG

“Unfortunately, that’s it. Hell Freezes Over contains an EP’s worth of new material followed by a live album. The Eagles, known for meticulously recreating their studio recordings in concert, nevertheless released Eagles Live in 1980. Six songs from that set reappear here, and only one is in a noticeably different arrangement, Hotel California, which gets an acoustic treatment.” AMG

“As was true on Eagles Live, the group remains most interested in their later material, redoing five songs from the Hotel California LP and two from its follow-up, The Long Run, but finding space for only three songs from their early days, Tequila Sunrise, Take It Easy, and Desperado, the last two of which were also on Eagles Live.” AMG

“As such, Hell Freezes Over is hard to justify as anything other than a souvenir for the Eagles’ reunion tour. That, however, did not keep it from topping the charts and selling in the millions.” AMG

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Tuesday, November 1, 1994

Aerosmith’s Big Ones compilation released

First posted 9/11/2020.

Big Ones

Aerosmith


Rating:

4.274 out of 5.00
(average of 5 ratings)


Released: November 1, 1994


Recorded: 1987-1994


Peak: 6 US, 7 UK, 2 CN, 12 AU


Sales (in millions): 4.0 US, 0.3 UK, 9.0 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks: (1) Walk on Water (2) Love in an Elevator (3) Rag Doll (4) What It Takes (5) Dude Looks Like a Lady (6) Janie’s Got a Gun (7) Cryin’ (8) Amazing (9) Blind Man (10) Deuces Are Wild (11) The Other Side (12) Crazy (13) Eat the Rich (14) Angel (15) Livin’ on the Edge


Total Running Time: 73:25


The Players:

  • Steven Tyler (vocals, keyboards, harmonica, percussion)
  • Joe Perry (guitar)
  • Brad Whitford (rhythm guitar)
  • Tom Hamilton (bass)
  • Joey Kramer (drums, percussion)

A Brief History:

The rock band Aerosmith formed in Boston in 1970. With hits like “Dream On,” “Walk This Way,” and “Sweet Emotion” they became one of America’s biggest rock bands. After six albums together, the original lineup started to fracture because of in-fighting and drug abuse. They released the tepid Rock in a Hard Place in 1982 without Perry or Whitford and it looked like they might be done as a band.

However, they jumped from Columbia Records to Geffen and found new life. The band reunited for 1985’s Done with Mirrors. The muted reception suggested the band might be done, but then rap group Run-D.M.C. remade the band’s “Walk This Way” into a top-five pop hit and reignited interest in Aerosmith.

Their next three albums were multi-platinum affairs which maintained the classic rock audiences while also finding new fans with younger crowds. Each of these has a dedicated DMDB page (click on links below), but snapshots on this page.

When the group returned to Columbia, Geffen released the Big Ones compilation to celebrate their most commercially successful years. Songs featured on Big Ones are noted below. Following the song title are the writers, the date of the song’s release or first chart appearance, and its chart peaks are noted in parentheses. Click for codes to singles charts.


Permanent Vacation (1987):

After Run-D.M.C. brought Aerosmith back in the limelight with their “Walk This Way” cover, the band followed with this album, which produced three top-20 hits on the Billboard Hot 100. One of those songs, Angel, became the band’s biggest charting hit to date.

  • Dude Looks Like a Lady (Tyler, Perry, Desmond Child) (8/29/87, 14 US, 4 AR, 20 UK, 22 CN, 95 AU)
  • Rag Doll (Tyler, Perry, Jim Vallance, Holly Knight) (9/12/87, 17 US, 12 AR, 42 UK, 23 CN)
  • Angel (Tyler, Child) (1/30/88, 3 US, 2 AR, 69 UK, 14 CN)


Pump (1989):

After the success of Permanent Vacation, Aerosmith stormed back even bigger with Pump, an album which gave the band three more top-ten hits and landed them atop the album rock chart for the first time with Love in an Elevator. The band also won their first Grammy – for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group – for the murder-and-abuse-themed Janie’s Got a Gun.

  • Love in an Elevator (Tyler, Perry) (9/2/89, 5 US, 1 AR, 13 UK, 13 CN, 33 AU, gold single)
  • Janie’s Got a Gun (Tyler, Tom Hamilton) (9/23/89, 4 US, 2 AR, 76 UK, 2 CN, 1 AU)
  • What It Takes (Tyler, Perry, Child) (1/13/90, 9 US, 1 AR, 15 CN, 46 CN)
  • The Other Side (Tyler, Vallance, Brian Holland, Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland) (6/16/90, 22 US, 1 AR, 46 UK, 22 CN, 73 AU)


Get a Grip (1993):

While this album failed to generate any top-10 pop hits, it produced seven songs which charted on various charts, including four top-40 pop hits and six top-10 album rock tracks. One of those cuts, Crazy, became the band’s most-watched video on YouTube with over a half billion views.

  • Livin’ on the Edge (Tyler, Perry, Mark Hudson) (4/10/93, 18 US, 1 AR, 19 UK)
  • Eat the Rich (Tyler, Perry, Vallance) (5/1/93, 5 AR, 34 UK)
  • Cryin’ (Tyler, Perry, Taylor Rhodes) (6/5/93, 12 US, 1 AR, 17 UK, gold single)
  • Amazing (Tyler, Richard Supa) (10/30/93, 24 US, 3 AR, 57 UK)
  • Crazy (Tyler, Perry, Child) (5/21/94, 17 US, UK, 7 AR, 23 UK)


Big Ones (1994):

The Big Ones compilation featured two new songs and one, Deuces Are Wild, which had never been released on an Aerosmith album. That song had been originally considered for 1989’s Pump, but didn’t surface until 1993 when it was released as a track on the various artists collection The Beavis and Butt-Head Experience.

  • Deuces Are Wild (Tyler, Vallance) (1/15/94, 14 AR, 25 CN)
  • Blind Man (Tyler, Perry, Taylor Rhodes) (11/5/94, 48 US, 3 AR, 5 CN, 76 AU)
  • Walk on Water (Tyler, Perry, Jack Blades, Tommy Shaw) (1/28/95, 16 AR)


Notes: A European edition of the album included a live version of “Dude Looks Like a Lady.” In 2004, a special edition of the album was released which included eight cuts from the band’s live 1998 album A Little South of Sanity.

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Tuesday, September 13, 1994

Sept. 13, 1994: Eric Clapton released From the Cradle, his first blues album

First posted March 31, 2008. Last updated September 9, 2018.

From the Cradle

Eric Clapton

Released: Sept. 13, 1994


Sales (in millions):
US: 3.0
UK: 0.1
IFPI: 1.0
World (estimated): 6.5


Peak:
US: 11
UK: 11
Canada: 2
Australia: 6

Quotable: “one of Clapton's finest moments” – Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide


Genre: blues


Album Tracks:

  1. Blues Before Sunrise (Carr) [2:58]
  2. Third Degree (Boyd/Dixon) [5:07]
  3. Reconsider Baby (Fulson) [3:20]
  4. Hoochie Coochie Man (Dixon) [3:16]
  5. Five Long Years (Boyd) [4:47]
  6. I’m Tore Down (Thompson) [3:02] (9/10/94, #5 AR)
  7. How Long Blues (Carr) [3:09]
  8. Goin’ Away Baby (Lane) [4:00]
  9. Blues Leave Me Alone (Lane) [3:36]
  10. Sinner’s Prayer (Fulson/Glenn) [3:20]
  11. Motherless Child (traditional) [2:57] (10/22/94, #23 AR)
  12. It Hurts Me Too (James) [3:17]
  13. Someday After a While (King/Thompson) [4:27]
  14. Standin’ Round Crying (Waters) [3:39]
  15. Driftin’ (Brown/Moore/Williams) [3:10]
  16. Groaning the Blues (Dixon) [6:05]

Singles/Hit Songs:

Click here for the chart codes for singles/hit songs.

Review:

Eric Clapton’s 1992 Unplugged gave him the most successful album of his career. It won the Grammy for Album of the Year and has sold more than 20 million copies. Instead of stressing him, however, Clapton felt free to do whatever he wanted. He opted to record an all-blues cover album, the first in his career, despite long being associated with the genre.

Reviews were mixed. All Music Guide’s Stephen Thomas Erlewine said “If it wasn't for Clapton's labored vocals, everything would be perfect.” STE “When he sings, Clapton loses that sense of originality, choosing to mimic the vocals of the original recordings. At times, his overemotive singing is painful; he doesn’t have the strength to pull off Howlin’ Wolf’s growl or the confidence to replicate Muddy Waters’ assured phrasing.” STE

Entertainment Weekly’s Tom Sinclair considered the recordings “flawless” but boring, WK but Erlewine said “the album manages to re-create the ambience of postwar electric blues, right down to the bottomless thump of the rhythm section.” STE He asserted it was easy to overlook Clapton’s “vocal shortcomings,” STE saying “as long as he plays his guitar, he can't fail – his solos are white-hot and evocative, original and captivating.” STE

Clapton once again received a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year. While he didn’t win that, he did take home the Grammy for Best Traditional Blues Album. He subsequently recorded more blues albums, including Riding with the King with B.B. King, Me and Mr. Johnson (a collection of Robert Johnson covers), and The Road to Escondido with J.J. Cale.


Review Source(s):

Awards:


Related DMDB Link(s):


Saturday, August 27, 1994

Boyz II Men spend 1st of 14 weeks at #1 with “I’ll Make Love to You”

First posted 3/28/2020; last updated 4/20/2020.

I’ll Make Love to You

Boyz II Men

Writer(s): Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds (see lyrics here)


Released: July 26, 1994


First Charted: August 5, 1994


Peak: 114 US, 113 CB, 14 RR, 13 AC, 19 RB, 5 UK, 13 CN, 12 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): 1.63 US, 0.45 UK, 2.14 world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): 2.0 radio, 153.3 video, -- streaming

Awards:

About the Song:

Boyz II Men emerged in 1991 with their debut album Cooleyhighharmony, featuring top-five hits “Motownphilly” and “It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye to Yesterday.” They followed up the album with “End of the Road,” a cut from the Boomerang soundtrack which topped the Billboard Hot 100 for 13 weeks, the most in the history of the chart at that time. They didn’t hold the record for long. Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” logged 14 weeks at the pinnacle in 1992-93.

However, Boyz II Men shot back with “I’ll Make Love to You,” the lead single from their 1994 album II. It matched Houston’s 14 weeks at #1. That record wouldn’t last long either. In 1995-96, Mariah Carey spent 16 weeks at #1 with “One Sweet Day” – a song featuring none other than Boyz II Men. That gave the R&B group the incredible distinction of singing on three of the four biggest #1 songs in the first 40 years of the history of the Billboard Hot 100.

Boyz II Men tapped Babyface, who’d co-written “End of the Road,” as the producer for their second album because of his experience singing hits on his own, writing for others such as Pebbles, Klymaxx, and the Whispers, and producing for Mary J. Blige, Aretha Franklin, Johnny Gill, Whitney Houston, and Madonna. SF

Babyface saw “I’ll Make Love to You” as kind of a sequel to “End of the Road.” He admitted it was hard to try to outdo that song, but that was essentially his goal. SF He said his hope was that “it not be exactly the same, but familiar enough where you could touch some of the same ingredients.” BR1 However, the group initially thought it sounded too much like “End of the Road” and considered leaving it off the album. According to Babyface, Motown Records’ then-president Jheryl Busby made the decision to release the song despite the protests of the group. SF It won a Grammy for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocals and American Music Awards for Favorite Pop/Rock Single and Favorite Soul/R&B single.


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Tuesday, August 23, 1994

Jeff Buckley’s Grace Released: August 23, 1994

image from themusicslut.com

Originally posted 8/23/2011. Updated 3/9/2013.


Released: 23 August 1994
Tracks: (Click for codes to singles charts.) 1. Mojo Pin 2. Grace 3. Last Goodbye (3/22/95, #54 UK, #19 MR) 4. Lilac Wine 5. So Real 6. Hallelujah (12/20/08, #2 UK, sales: 1.0 m) 7. Lover, You Should’ve Come Over 8. Corpus Christi Carol (for Roy) 9. Eternal Life 10. Dream Brother

Sales (in millions): 0.5 US, -- UK, 1.5 world (includes US and UK)

Peak: 149 US, 42 UK

Rating:


Review: Buckley had “one of the finest voices of a generation,” AD a voice which “resembled a cross between Robert Plant, Van Morrison, and his father Tim.” AMG His delivery ranged from “delicate and dreamy to highly charged and nakedly emotional.” IC He “could go from a whisper to a roar” AD with his “impassioned, octave defying singing…inherited from his late father Tim along with his matinee idol good looks.” SM “Buckley is doubtless sick of the Son Of Tim tag (especially as dad was never around) but the inheritance of his father’s vocal range and disregard for conventional form is inescapable.” IC

“Buckley had been plying his trade round the coffee houses of New York before hooking up with ex-Magic Band guitarist Gary Lucas in the short lived Gods and Monsters. The band failed to release a record, but Buckley’s profile was raised sufficiently to get him a solo deal…Entering the studio with a hurriedly recruited band, Buckley set about making Grace.” SM

“His extreme intensity and emotional sincerity make Grace…a flourishing achievement.” CH Buckley crafted original “songs of mystery and spirituality” IC which “are full of a search for redemption and all about love, loss and faith.” AD He “jumbles jazz, R&B, blues and rock references” SZ along with “French chanson, eastern melodies and classical choral music to create a classic rock record almost without precedent.” SM It “sounds like a Led Zeppelin album written by an ambitious folkie with a fondness for lounge jazz.” AMG

Sadly, it was the only full-length solo album released in Buckley’s lifetime. He went drinking with a friend on May 29, 1997, and died of an accidental drowning after diving in to the water fully clothed.

Hallelujah


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Award(s):