Monday, September 24, 1979

Eagles’ The Long Run released

First posted 3/26/2008; updated 9/16/2020.

The Long Run

Eagles


Released: September 24, 1979


Peak: 19 US, 4 UK, 15 CN, 13 AU


Sales (in millions): 7.0 US, 0.10 UK, 12.10 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks: Click for codes to singles charts.

  1. The Long Run (12/1/79, 8 US, 66 UK, 34 AC, 9 CN)
  2. I Can’t Tell You Why (2/23/80, 8 US, 3 AC, 5 CN)
  3. In the City
  4. The Disco Strangler
  5. King of Hollywood
  6. Heartache Tonight (10/6/79, 1 US, 38 AC, 40 UK, 1 CN, 13 AU, gold single)
  7. Those Shoes
  8. Teenage Jail
  9. The Greeks Don’t Want No Freaks
  10. The Sad Café


Total Running Time: 42:29


The Players:

  • Glenn Frey (vocals, guitar, keyboards)
  • Don Henley (vocals, drums)
  • Don Felder (guitar, vocals)
  • Timothy B. Schmit (bass, vocals)
  • Joe Walsh (guitar, keyboards, vocals)

Rating:

3.634 out of 5.00 (average of 20 ratings)


Awards:

About the Album:

“Three years in the making (which was considered an eternity in the ‘70s), the Eagles’ follow-up to the massively successful, critically acclaimed Hotel California was a major disappointment, even though it sold several million copies and threw off three hit singles.” AMG

“Those singles, in fact, provide some insight into the record. Heartache Tonight was an old-fashioned rock & roll song sung by Glenn Frey, while I Can’t Tell You Why was a delicate ballad by Timothy B. Schmit, the band’s newest member. Only The Long Run, a conventional pop/rock tune with a Stax Records R&B flavor, bore the stamp and vocal signature of Don Henley, who had largely taken the reins of the band on Hotel California.” AMG

“Henley also dominated The Long Run, getting co-writing credits on nine of the ten songs, singing five lead vocals, and sharing another two with Frey. This time around, however, Henley’s contributions were for the most part painfully slight. Only ‘The Long Run’ and the regret-filled closing song, The Sad Café, showed any of his usual craftsmanship. The album was dominated by second-rank songs like The Disco Strangler, King of Hollywood, and Teenage Jail that sounded like they couldn’t have taken three hours much less three years to come up with.” AMG

“Joe Walsh’s In the City was up to his usual standard, but it may not even have been an Eagles recording, having appeared months earlier on the soundtrack to The Warriors, where it was credited as a Walsh solo track.” AMG

“Amazingly, The Long Run reportedly was planned as a double album before being truncated to a single disc. If these were the keepers, what could the rejects have sounded like?” AMG

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Friday, September 21, 1979

The Police charted with “Message in a Bottle”

First posted 3/1/2020.

Message in a Bottle

The Police

Writer(s): Sting (see lyrics here)


Released: September 21, 1979


First Charted: September 22, 1979


Peak: 74 US, 62 CB, 80 HR, 2 CL, 3 CO, 13 UK, 2 CN, 5 AU (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): -- US, -- UK, -- world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 79.8 video, -- streaming

Awards (The Police version):

Awards (Sting version):

About the Song:

“Message in a Bottle” was the lead single from the Police’s second album, Regatta De Blanc. It was the band’s first #1 in their native UK, where they’d also top the charts with “Walking on the Moon,” “Don’t Stand So Close to Me,” “Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic,” and “Every Breath You Take.” In the U.S., the band wasn’t that big yet. “Roxanne,” from their first album, had gone top 40, but “Message in a Bottle” stalled at #74 on the Billboard Hot 100. However, bigger things were still to come. With their next three albums, the group would reach the top 10 in the U.S. six different times, including the #1 smash “Every Breath You Take.” The song also gained a following over the years. In fact, the Police opened their 2007 reunion concerts with the song.

Lyrically, the song unspools a tale of a lonely, island castaway who throws a message in a bottle into the ocean in hopes of finding someone. Only after determining he is destined to be alone, does he find “a hundred billion bottles washed up on the shore.” It’s then that the song’s narrator realizes, as he says in the song, “it seems I’m not alone in being alone.”

In an interview on the BBC, Sting said it was his favorite song. He told Q magazine, “I like the idea that while it’s about loneliness and alienation it’s also about finding solace ando other people going through the same thing.” WK Musically, he explained that the song grew out of Gregorian chants he used to sing as an altar boy. SF Drummer Stewart Copeland said it was one of the band’s “best moments in the studio and always great on stage.” WK Guitarist Andy Summers said, “for me, it’s still the best song Sting ever came up with.” WK

Before Sting launched his solo career, he performed a stripped-down, slower version of the song for The Secret Policeman’s Other Ball on September 9, 1981. It was the fourth benefit show staged by the British section of Amnesty International to raise funds and awareness regarding human rights.


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Tuesday, September 11, 1979

Foreigner released Head Games

First posted 9/20/2020.

Head Games

Foreigner


Released: September 11, 1979


Peak: 5 US, -- UK, 5 CN, 45 AU


Sales (in millions): 5.0 US, -- UK, 6.5 world (includes US and UK)


Genre: classic rock


Tracks:

Song Title (Writers) [time] (date of single release, chart peaks) Click for codes to singles charts.

  1. Dirty White Boy (9/8/79, 12 US, 6 CL, 14 CN)
  2. Love on the Telephone
  3. Women (2/16/80, 41 US, 16 CL, 82 CN)
  4. I’ll Get Even with You
  5. Seventeen
  6. Head Games (11/10/79, 14 US, 6 CL, 14 CN)
  7. The Modern Day
  8. Blinded by Science
  9. Do What You Like
  10. Rev on the Red Line (44 CL)


Total Running Time: 38:12


The Players:

  • Lou Gramm (vocals, percussion)
  • Mick Jones (guitar, keyboards, vocals)
  • Ian McDonald (guitar, backing vocals, keyboards)
  • Al Greenwood (keyboards)
  • Dennis Elliott (drums)
  • Rick Wills (bass)

Rating:

3.195 out of 5.00 (average of 8 ratings)

About the Album:

While Head Games didn’t quite match the lofty heights of Foreigner’s debut or Double Vision, it didn’t miss by much. It was the group’s third top-10, multi-platinum album and generated two top-20 hits.

The album marked the debut of Rick Wills as the new bassist after Ed Gagliardi was fired from the band. Wills had formerly been with Jokers Wild and Small Faces. The album was also mark the finale for founding members Ian McDonald and Al Greenwood, who left the group after recording the album.

The album was preceded by the “thunderous hard rock song” WK Dirty White Boy as the first single. The title cut followed as the second single. However, after eight top-40 hits over three albums, Foreigner finally missed the mark with the third single from Double Vision. Women peaked just outside the top 40 at #41.

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