Saturday, November 27, 1976

Sex Pistols chart with “Anarchy in the U.K.”

First posted 4/9/2020.

Anarchy in the U.K.

The Sex Pistols

Writer(s): Paul Cook, Steve Jones, John Lydon, Glen Matlock (see lyrics here)


Released: November 26, 1976


First Charted: November 27, 1976


Peak: 33 UK, 1 CL, 1 CO (Click for codes to singles charts.)


Sales (in millions): -- US, -- UK, -- world (includes US + UK)


Airplay/Streaming (in millions): -- radio, 27.04 video, -- streaming

Awards:

About the Song:

During the mid-‘70s, a stagnant economy, labor strikes, and the “perpetually drizzly weather that has always afflicted the country” TB contributed to general dissatisfaction amongst British youth and “things seemed to assume a permanent greyness.” TB The Sex Pistols “contempt for their dreary culture and moribund music scene” TB put them at the forefront of the British punk scene.

Then band had generated buzz with their live shows and “the groundswell that was clearly building..for snotty, amateurish rock bands.” CR EMI signed the band and their first single, “Anarchy in the U.K.,” as released in late 1976. It is “what the beginning of a revolution sounds like.” RS500 Its “wit and anger make it the great political protest song of our times.” MC It certainly generated controversy – British radio banned it and EMI “pulled the single and dropped the band, which just made them more notorious. ‘I don’t understand it,’ Rotten said in 1977. ‘All we’re trying to do is destroy everything.’” RS500

The Sex Pistols “were not only sincere in their desire to make rock that smashed rock, but…they were absolutely equal to the task.” MA They “essentially…reinforced what the garage bands of the ‘60s had demonstrated – you don’t need technique to make rock & roll.” CR

Actually, though, while “Anarchy” certainly displayed combative lyrics by opening with “I am an anti-Christ” and ending with “Destroy!” it was otherwise “comparatively familiar, highly competent hard-rock.” TB Steve “Jones made his guitar sound like a pub brawl, while [Johnny] Rotten snarled, spat, [and] snickered” RS500 with an “evil cackle.” RS500 This is a band, which despite its reputation for not being able to play, “understood perfectly how to make rock and roll effects in the recording studio.” MA


Resources and Related Links:

  • Sex Pistols’ DMDB Encyclopedia entry
  • CR Toby Creswell (2005). 1001 Songs: The Great Songs of All Time. Thunder’s Mouth Press: New York, NY. Page 735.
  • MA Dave Marsh (1989). The Heart of Rock and Soul: The 1001 Greatest Singles Ever Made. New York, NY; New American Library. Pages 72-3.
  • MC Neil McCormack (3/13/09). Telegraph.co.uk “100 Greatest Songs of All Time
  • RS500 Rolling Stone (4/7/2011). “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.
  • TB Thunder Bay Press (2006). Singles: Six Decades of Hot Hits & Classic Cuts. Outline Press Ltd.: San Diego, CA. Page 165.
  • WK Wikipedia
  • WI Paul Williams (1993). Rock and Roll: The Best 100 Singles. New York, NY: Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc. Page 168.

Friday, November 19, 1976

Nov. 19, 1976: studio album of Evita released

First posted November 14, 2010. Last updated September 4, 2018.

Evita (studio/cast/soundtrack)

Andrew Lloyd Webber/Tim Rice (composers)

Studio Album Released: Nov. 19, 1976

First Stage Production: June 21, 1978

Soundtrack Released: Nov. 12, 1996


Sales (in millions):
US: 1.0 C, 5.0 S
UK: 0.3 SR, 0.6 S
IFPI: 2.0 S
World (estimated): 1.3 C, 18.0 S


Peak:
US: 105 C, 2 S
UK: 4 SR, 11-S
Canada: --
Australia: --

SR Studio Album
C Cast Album
S Soundtrack

Quotable: --


Genre: show tunes


Album Tracks – Studio/Cast Album:

  1. Cinema in Buenos Aires, 26 July 1952
  2. Requiem for Evita / Oh What a Circus
  3. On This Night of a Thousand Stars / Eva and Magaldi / Eva Beware of the City
  4. Buenos Aires
  5. Goodnight and Thank You
  6. The Lady's Got Potential **
  7. Charity Concert / I’d Be Surprisingly Good for You
  8. Another Suitcase in Another Hall
  9. Dangerous Jade *
  10. A New Argentina
  11. On the Balcony of the Casa Rosada / Don’t Cry for Me Argentina
  12. High Flying, Adored
  13. Rainbow High
  14. Rainbow Tour
  15. The Actress Hasn’t Learned the Lines (You’d Like to Hear)
  16. And the Money Kept Rolling (In and Out)
  17. Santa Evita
  18. Waltz for Eva and Che
  19. She Is a Diamond
  20. Dice Are Rolling * / Eva’s Sonnet *
  21. Eva’s Final Broadcast
  22. Montage *
  23. Lament
* Unique to cast album
** Unique to studio album

Album Tracks – Soundtrack:

Disc 1:

  1. Cinema in Buenos Aires, 26 July 1952
  2. Requiem for Evita
  3. Oh What a Circus (ANTONIO BANDERAS / MADONNA)
  4. On This Night of a Thousand Stars (JIMMY NAIL)
  5. Eva and Magaldi / Eva Beware of the City (MADONNA / JIMMY NAIL / ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  6. Buenos Aires (MADONNA)
  7. Another Suitcase in Another Hall (MADONNA)
  8. Goodnight and Thank You (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  9. The Lady's Got Potential (ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  10. Charity Concert / The Art of the Possible (MADONNA / JIMMY NAIL / ANTONIO BANDERAS) **
  11. I’d Be Surprisingly Good for You (MADONNA / JONATHAN PRYCE)
  12. Hello and Goodbye (MADONNA / JONATHAN PRYCE / ANDREA CORR) **
  13. Peron’s Latest Flame (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS) **
  14. A New Argentina (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS / JONATHAN PRYCE)
Disc 2:
  1. On the Balcony of the Casa Rosada 1 (JONATHAN PRYCE)
  2. Don’t Cry for Me Argentina (MADONNA)
  3. On the Balcony of the Casa Rosada 2 (MADONNA) **
  4. High Flying, Adored (ANTONIO BANDERAS / MADONNA)
  5. Rainbow High (MADONNA)
  6. Rainbow Tour (ANTONIO BANDERAS / GARY BROOKER / MADONNA)
  7. The Actress Hasn’t Learned the Lines (You’d Like to Hear) (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  8. And the Money Kept Rolling (In and Out) (ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  9. Partido Feminista (MADONNA) **
  10. She Is a Diamond (JONATHAN PRYCE)
  11. Santa Evita
  12. Waltz for Eva and Che (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS)
  13. Your Little Body Is Slowly Breaking Down (MADONNA / JONATHAN PRYCE) **
  14. You Must Love Me (MADONNA) **
  15. Eva’s Final Broadcast (MADONNA)
  16. Latin Chant **
  17. Lament (MADONNA / ANTONIO BANDERAS)
** Unique to soundtrack.

Singles/Hit Songs:

  • Don’t Cry for Me Argentina (JULIE COVINGTON) c (11/12/76) #1 UK
  • Another Suitcase in Another Hall (BARBARA DICKSON) c (2/7/77) #18 UK
  • Don’t Cry for Me Argentina (SHADOWS) c (12/78) #5 UK
  • You Must Love Me s (11/2/96) #18 US, #10 UK, #15 AC, gold single
  • Don’t Cry for Me Argentina (MADONNA) s (12/28/96) #8 US, #3 UK, #21 AC
  • Another Suitcase in Another Hall (MADONNA) s (3/29/97) #7 UK

Click here for the chart codes for singles/hit songs.

Review:

Like they had with Jesus Christ Superstar, Andrew Lloyd Webber presented Evita first as a studio album and then developed it into a stage production. It wasn’t a monstrous hit in the U.S. like the studio version of Superstar had been, but in the UK, it spawned a #1 hit with Don’t Cry for Me Argentina and a top 20 hit with Another Suitcase in Another Hall. R-C

For the opera based on the real-life Eva Peron, Webber “naturally drew upon Latin themes, at least of an ersatz sort (On This Night of a Thousand Stars aped Pérez Prado’s 1955 hit ‘Cherry Pink and Apple Blossom White’), to add to his taste in pop/rock and affection for Puccini.” R-C For his part, Rice “had a big, rich story to tell about a social-climbing peasant who achieves the highest rungs of power, only to succumb to early death.” R-C He used “the fictional Che (based on Latin American revolutionary Che Guevara), to challenge Evita’s ruthlessness. The subject matter attracted the criticism that it glamorized a fascist, but Rice’s very point was to present a cautionary tale about the deceptive appeal of such a person.” R-C

“The choice of Julie Covington, who could negotiate the musical range of the title role and sing without warmth, was perfect; no stage successor matched her willingness to make Evita unsympathetic C.T. (Colm) Wilkinson's Che was her match, and the rest of the cast sang effectively.” R-C

Twenty years later, Madonna took the lead in the film version. She gambled on it establishing her “as a proper movie star and respected actress.” R-S She “gives a startlingly accomplished and nuanced performance,” R-S but it “is impossible to listen to her without getting the impression that she is trying really hard to be credible.” R-S

As such, the soundtrack “remains curiously unengaging,” R-S although it is “an exquisitely produced and expertly rendered” R-S “audio document of the entire film, since there is no dialogue in the movie.” R-S “Even with the faults, Evita has its merits, including the written-for-film ballad You Must Love Me, and is worth investigating. It just isn't the definitive work that it wishes to be.” R-S


Review Sources:

Awards:


Related DMDB Link(s):